Which solder to buy

Discussion in 'General Engine Discussion' started by dnp101677, Feb 2, 2011.

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  1. Feb 2, 2011 #1

    dnp101677

    dnp101677

    dnp101677

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    I am buying silver solder for the first time in order to solder some small brass components. I want to buy .032 dia, I think, and I will use flux per a suggestion on another post shown here...

    http://sra-solder.com/product.php/6073/96

    I was going to buy the solder from the same supplier shown here...

    http://sra-solder.com/product.php/6154/90

    I am not sure just how much a Troy once is though. I googled it and it seems like almost a pound or so - is that a decent amount. They only show a little bit in the picture. How far will a troy once go?
     
  2. Feb 2, 2011 #2

    mklotz

    mklotz

    mklotz

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    A troy ounce is 31.1 grams or about 1.1 ounces avoirdupois, a far,far cry from a pound.
     
  3. Feb 2, 2011 #3

    Deanofid

    Deanofid

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    An ounce of .032 silver wire will be about 20 ft long. Plenty.
    Get the wire you showed, and the flux you showed in the links and you will be set.
    I use the same stuff, from the same company.
     
  4. Feb 3, 2011 #4

    Layne

    Layne

    Layne

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    I've use Harris Stay-Silv 45% and 56% extensively. I would not prefer the 45 for work on brass. The melting temp is about 100F higher than the 56 and it leaves a very narrow temp window to work in. Even the 56 may be too hot for thin brass, it works at about 1200F. I normally only use the 45 on stainless steel, especially where you need 2 different solders in order to keep from melting the first joint while you do the 2nd joint. Harris makes a white and a black flux, the black is excellent for SS and 45% solder where the white will burn up. I suppose the white is cheaper, but if you burn the flux you have to start over.

    There are 12 Troy ounces in 1lb
     
  5. Feb 3, 2011 #5

    Deanofid

    Deanofid

    Deanofid

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    If you have trouble getting brass too hot, you are probably just... getting it too hot.
    Silver brazing/hard soldering on thin materials is not different than doing thick stuff,
    except the temp gets where it needs to be faster. Just saying you shouldn't have any
    problems with it.


    [​IMG]

    45% silver and .032" brass sheet to .005" brass shim stock.



    [​IMG]

    45% silver and two pieces of .024" brass sheet.



    [​IMG]

    56% silver and thin brass sheet to thin wall brass tube.
    Have at it, and practice a bit.
     
  6. Feb 4, 2011 #6

    dnp101677

    dnp101677

    dnp101677

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    So, do you melt brass shim stock over top the silver solder? This way you don't have the contrast of silver joints on brass parts?
     
  7. Feb 5, 2011 #7

    Deanofid

    Deanofid

    Deanofid

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    Not sure I know what you mean. None of the brass pieces in the pictures were melted. You melt the silver, not the brass.
     

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