Where to scrounge strong stepper motors from?

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Dinkum

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Hi all,

I am getting components together to build a CNC dividing head and I am now looking for a stepper motor. It has been mentioned that the can be scrounged off printers, etc., but I am not sure about the specs of these.

So there are really two questions. First, what torque level am I looking for to drive a smallish (say about 4-6") dividing head and secondly, where is the best machine to find/scrounge these from?

Does a photocopier have nice strong ones?





 

ShedBoy

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The most common ones I have found are stepsyn nema 23 size in medium size office copiers. They range in specs but they usually run at a low voltage in a copier and you can up the supply voltage to them (so I am led to believe) to get some good speed. There is already a large torque multiplyer in the worm gear if that is the way you are going. I am going to be playing with some of these steppers probably on the weekend so should have some more info. You should be able to get them for free so there is not much to lose.

Brock
 

Tin Falcon

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Dink I have a NEMA 23 out of an indrial label printer. my guess about 260 in/oz
tin
 

Dinkum

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Thanks for the replies.

I've just arranged to pick up an office photocopier later this week. Hopefully it will have at least one good motor in it. I'll post up how it goes.

Also, Tin, is this the right forum to post small, silly questions like this in?




 

Tin Falcon

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Tin, is this the right forum to post small, silly questions like this in?
well since you asked imho opinion it probably should be in the cnc area. Not real harm but if someone is looking for info like this that is where i would look first.,
I can move this whole thread if you like just a couple of mouse clicks.
no problem.
Tin
 

Dinkum

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Tin Falcon said:
I can move this whole thread if you like just a couple of mouse clicks.
Why not? ;) Yes please.

I'll just stick all my CNC questions from now on in one thread in the CNC forum.
 

Dinkum

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:redface2: There was not a single stepper in my copier! And it's late 1990s too!

Anyway, here is a couple of pics of what I did get. Can these motors be re-used? I think they are both 190 volts and need start capacitors. Does that sound right? Also, what are these round things? Are they rotary encoders? If so, can I re-use them/ is there a digital board you can buy for them?

(There is actually a coil around the topmost piece in the first picture - it is hard to see)

IMAG0275 compressed.jpg


IMAG0276 compressed.jpg


IMAG0277 compressed.jpg
 

Tin Falcon

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well dink I have purchased nice japan made steppers on e bay for $ 25 and gecko has USA made ones for IIRC $55 each yes money but not horrible. There are places around that recylce computer systems usually not profits. I have purchased used stuff cheap from them .I have seen large plotters on there display floor. Check your area for computer recyclers and talk to the folk take and engine tell them what you are trying to do you can probably pick through an get some for scrap prices.
just a thought.
 

bezalel2000

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Hi Dinkum

The round things look like solenoids. The round piece running through the middle is the armature, usually held in place by a spring or gravity. It engages a lever or another shaft via the slots in the head of the armature. when the coil is energised the armature is pulled into the coil (or pushed out of the coil) to engage (or disengage) the other levers, switches or shafts.

If your into experimenting don't let your fingers get between the armature and the coil body at switch on! *bang* there are not enough expletives to describe the resulting sensation. :hDe:

Bez
 

gabby

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Hi there,
I think you have 2xsolenoid coils and 2x small induction motors (they look to be brushless) the motors have 2 windings = 1x start winding and 1x run winding, usually the start winding has a capacitor in the circuit to offset the single phase a little to induce an electrical direction which in turn is aided by the 50-60 hertz on/off sequencing of the a/c power supply.
Well thats my 2 bob's worth anyway.
Cheers
Graham
 

ShedBoy

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I got a spare one if you want it Dinkum just have to arrange getting it to you, I am only using it as a paper weight. I am down south of you. Send a PM if interested. I am at work till Friday though but can answer emails.
Brock
 

ShedBoy

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Just had a close look at the last pic you posted and it looks like some sort of gear reduction hanging off it. Maybe a planetary gear set? Rip it open.

Brock
 

ShedBoy

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Did you keep all sorts of goodies from the copier? The ones I have found have had precision ground shafts, bushes, bearings, gears, timing belts and all sorts of other interesting bits.
Brock
 

doubletop

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I was offered a set of ex equipment steppers with the intention of dabbling in CNC. I tracked them down to being Oriental Motors products so asked them for a spec sheet and got this reply.

Thank you for contacting Oriental Motor Tech Support. In regards to your email, unfortunately, the part numbers you have requested are proprietary products which we had custom built for an original equipment manufacturer. We do not offer after-market support or sale of this product. You would need to contact the maker of the machine for any specifications, support, or to obtain a replacement
I took it that even if they use stock items they change the part numbers for OEM applications. I'd imagine that way they support their vendors rather than allow third party's to undercut on price.

Pete
 

Blogwitch

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Dinkum,

To get those motors shown working correctly, you will most probably have to spend a fair amount of money, and even then they won't do the job that you want them to do.

The best way is to buy a stepper to do the job, and throw the others in the garbage. I used to have hundreds of recycled motors knocking about, and only really found a proper job for one type of them, so they were all given away.

You need a motor of at least this strength to turn your RT with enough power to cut on the run. 2nd & 3rd ones down.

http://www.arceurotrade.co.uk/Catalogue/Stepper-Motors/Stepper-Motors

You can download the data sheets for them from the advert.

John

 

RonGinger

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John is right, forget finding salvage motors and get a new, know motor. Here is one from the keling site:

NEMA 23 BIPOLAR STEPPER MOTOR 156 oz-in KL23H251-24-8B ( ¼” dual shaft with a flat) $26.95
Specification , Torque-Speed-Curve
156 oz In. Hybrid Motor
1.8° /200 Steps Per Rev.
3.4 Amps Current Per Phase ( Bipolar Parallel)
8-wire Bi-polar or unipolar, NEMA 23 Frame
for $26.95 you will have a new, know good motor.

I used to look for, and buy, cheap steppers at flea markets. I junked them all (or sold them off at flea markets ;D )and will only use new motors now. Even retired my time is worth more than fooling with old junk.
 

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