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What to charge to thread a rod

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ShopShoe

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One more consideration regarding the original question: What is the use the threaded rods would be put to?

I would not get involved in this if these rods were for a critical use like securing heavy things over people (thinking of pipe hangers, etc.) Never mind the possibility of lawsuits, I would not like to be connected with a tragedy.

I have done things for people over the years and I have refused to do things some of the times and the reason for the yes/no was not always related to the money.

--ShopShoe
 

Steamchick

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Davidyat.
On behalf of my erstwhile colleagues who contribute to the chat herewith: I hope you don't mind all the more senior (and mostly retired?) contributors, of whom I am one, venting their spleens and trying to re-write the way to run the world. I see it a lot - and contribute my share - on this site. It is something that the so called "primitive" tribes did in long times past. The young get on with living, raising kids and collecting food and making shelters, while the older members sit around and debate how it was better when they were younger! We seem to do much the same today?
So I hope you can extract some sense from our combined opinions, and make a decision that leaves you comfortable with what you are doing.
Happy machining - even though it is not machining bits for engines, or the related engineering, your topic seems to have excited us all!
Regards,
K2 ;)
 

Richard Hed

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Davidyat.
On behalf of my erstwhile colleagues who contribute to the chat herewith: I hope you don't mind all the more senior (and mostly retired?) contributors, of whom I am one, venting their spleens and trying to re-write the way to run the world. I see it a lot - and contribute my share - on this site. It is something that the so called "primitive" tribes did in long times past. The young get on with living, raising kids and collecting food and making shelters, while the older members sit around and debate how it was better when they were younger! We seem to do much the same today?
So I hope you can extract some sense from our combined opinions, and make a decision that leaves you comfortable with what you are doing.
Happy machining - even though it is not machining bits for engines, or the related engineering, your topic seems to have excited us all!
Regards,
K2 ;)
yeah, and the snow was whiter when I was a kid too.
 

goldstar31

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yeah, and the snow was whiter when I was a kid too.
And avoid eating yellow snow! But the soundest advice is to do it for free.
A wise old bird like me would avoid avoid possible litigation -- if something went wrong.
The argument would be that you were not a professional but someone that was doing something 'out of the goodness of one's heart'
The argument is that the stuff could have been bought and consequently been covered by 3rd Pat liability insurance or some such clause. I doubt that you have such cover- so you have made a gift.
 

Steamchick

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The problem is "the customer" - who apparently insists on payment. - hence the initial question. Possibly because the school has accountants - who must have invoices and stuff to fill their books in order to prove how expensive it is and thus require more funds? Charity doesn't fulfil their need to balance books.
One example of this:- After the frost has finished, local councils dump their remaining salt on the roads... as otherwise they won't get as much money next year... Or am I cynical when I see them gritting in April? - after the frosts?
K2.
 

Steamchick

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I lived further south... we only had snow in December 1962... Now with climate change we don't get much in the North either... It is only on the news when London gets a smattering, not when towns and villages get cut-off. Last I had was Snowdonia in Nov. '82. That was white snow! - 3 days before the town was accessible after clearing all the crashed lorries and buses on snowy hilly roads. The warmest place was inside Dinorwic Power station - that we were building....
Memories... I'll have another whisky to forget!
K2
 

goldstar31

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I lived further south... we only had snow in December 1962...
K2
So you would have come across John Angelo Jackson of Plas Y Brenin- of the 1953 Everest thing and of of course---- was a Goldstar31 of RAF Squadron 31( The Goldstars). He gave my late wife her 'Two Star' at Geilo in Norway. Christine's Dad flew with John in Burma. Funny old World.
I was with Reisser Larsen which is why an old man in a wheelchair dare wear his Norwegian Red Cross Winter Survival Badge.
The 'Memsahib' used to turn up at Sunderland Hospital with Ra Kerr Gilbert for the babies born with in Sunderland with cleft palates. RK-G and my wife were both Fellows of the Royal College of Surgeons- my wife was No2 Lady in Dentistry. Funny old World.
Funny but Christine and I had a bhutt an bein looking into the Lairig Ghru in the Cairngorms and also a ski apartment ( well, really two or three) at 1800 and one at 1600 metres in the Savoie above the Isere above Bourg St Maurice. However we always went on a charitable music course each August in the Tirol and--- watched the snow arrive on the JungFrau.

Look it up-- and be prepared for a surprise
 

Steamchick

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I don't like suprises, and I'm not really bothered about snow! - I fought with it working in Scotland at the Lochaber smelter - Fort William - just below Ben Nevis. And tried to get stranded on the Black Mount, Rannock Moor, and other snowy roads, many times. Is this the suprise?
1611415833954.png

K2
 

goldstar31

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I don't like suprises, and I'm not really bothered about snow! - I fought with it working in Scotland at the Lochaber smelter - Fort William - just below Ben Nevis. And tried to get stranded on the Black Mount, Rannock Moor, and other snowy roads, many times. Is this the suprise?
View attachment 122430le Suris
Vraiment, quelle Surprise!
Tres jolie, n'es pas?
The language in a Relais et Chateau in Berwang is French not Low German.
I might have skied with the Jaeger Korps lot but that is another story.

I , demens, etsaevas curre per Aples,

Ut pueris placeas et declamatio fias
Juvenal

or Go madman,

traverse the rugged Alps and become a subject for recitation.
 
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SmithDoor

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Some here has take how much to charge and should you charge
This something for you to decide.

The last time charge a friend was 2008.
It was very long job about 250 hours.

This just FYI only.

Dave

I normally don't charge friends or family to do something for them. However, a neighbor asked what I would charge their school to thread 24 rods with 3/8 - 24 threads at each end. And she will not let me do it for free. Any idea what I should charge?
Grasshopper
 

MachineTom

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What sort of work holding will you use with the Rod. 3/8 NC is tough sometimes depending on material. Scored rod from slipping in the chuck/collet never shows well. A diehead is what I'd use for the threads, work in a collet, but if material is more than mild steel, you may need a dog driver as well. A die holder in the tailstock second choice, avoid a die handle if you can.

If doing this I would charge 2 dozen chocolate chip cookies, home made of course.
 

nealeb

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Standard rate of exchange round here (South Devon, UK) is a bottle of red wine. Two bottles if it's a big job...

I'm in the middle of cutting a house sign for a neighbour's new house which might be a two-bottle job as it involves more work than usual (had to 3D scan a relief image from an existing sign to be able to CNC cut a copy) but it's also taught me some useful new techniques so it's swings and roundabouts. Bit more interesting than threading some steel rods, anyway!
 

vederstein

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David,

Go to misumi.com. It's a Japanese company with a US distribution. You can purchased customized machined parts from then and the prices for the custom part is right on the configuration page.

I'm my profession, I use them frequently.

In your situation, I'd configure 24 rods without threading, then 24 rods with threading. Take the difference and that's the cost Misumi would charge for the threading operation.

Remember though, they're an industrial supplier, so as a hobbyist, personally I'd cut that price down a bit.

I hope this helps.


...Ved.
 

William May

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yeah, and the snow was whiter when I was a kid too.
Not only was the snow whiter, it was TWICE as deep as it is nowadays! Also, it was uphill both ways, and there were WOLVES, not these silly occasional stray dogs you run into now. I'm talking RAVENING PACKS OF WOLVES, that you had to beat off with a shovel. We always carried a shovel with us, just in case of wolves. I was fortunate to survive my time as a teen in the 1970's. There were no cell-phones to call for help with, either! We had to build a signal fire back then, or use the flare guns we carried when we went out in the winter!
Back then, if we were lonely, we'd go outside and walk around and pick up the conversations that had taken place, that had frozen, and fallen to the ground, and take them home in bushel baskets, and thaw them out in front of the fireplace and listen to them, just for something to do! There was no cable TV or these silly computers back then.
You kids today!
 

Wheat47

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While I was working in a Railroad maintenance shop, I did some "contract" work for them in my shop.
One of the projects was some pins, 2" dia. x 6" long with a 1/2" threaded hole in one end.
They furnished the material. I had to cut the shafts to length with a power bandsaw, so I had to face the ends
to make them nice and flat.
I made 3 to start with, I think, keeping track of the time.
As I recall, I charged them $10 each and didn't worry about the time as I would work on them for a while,
then get distracted to do something else. You know how it goes. Anyway that worked for me.

I,ve made a few small pieces for the neighboring farmers over the years. Most of the time I've been able to
make the pieces in just a few minutes, usually while they look over my shoulder. I usually don't charge for
something like that. But when ever I need to borrow their skidsteer loader or need a load of manure
for the garden, they're happy to oblige.
 

Rotormac

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An apple pie and about 3 dozen chocolate chip cookies sounds about right.
The bottle of wine is good. If I do a 3D design and print for someone, I usually ask for a reel of filament in return.
If she won't let you do it for free, you'll just have to get tough with her ;-)
 

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