what is monel metal

Discussion in 'Metals' started by werowance, Nov 27, 2015.

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  1. Nov 27, 2015 #1

    werowance

    werowance

    werowance

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    hello everyone, I decided to try my hand at making a trench style cigarette lighter out of a popular science magazine from the 50's and have a few questions.

    1. it recommends monel metal. what is that? what would be a good substitute? im trying brass without much success
    2. on the flint tube, I must tap the inside to #10 x cant remember the threads. and cut the outside to 3/16 by cant remember the number of threads. sorry im at work and don't have the plans here. but with brass I snap the tube off every time cutting the outside. I have even increased the outside from 3/16 to a 5 mm thread still witout luck. so was wondering if there would be a trick such as annealing the brass first or something. or if I just need to find monel metal.

    thanks much.
    Bryan
     
  2. Nov 27, 2015 #2

    james_III

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  3. Nov 27, 2015 #3

    bazmak

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    Monel metals are alloys in the family of stainless steels.316 would be an adequate substitute for what you are doing.Easy to btain and work
     
  4. Nov 27, 2015 #4

    werowance

    werowance

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    ah, great, I happen to have a stick of 316. just hope its big enough.

    I figured it was going to be soft metal since most trench lighters are brass.

    thank you very much.

    have a great weekend and don't eat to many thanks giving left overs.

    :):)
     
  5. Nov 27, 2015 #5

    10K Pete

    10K Pete

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    Monel is a high nickle alloy used in corrosive sea water situations. Most
    larger metal dealers will have access to it although its us has been pretty
    much been replaced by stainless steel as Monel has a lot of copper in it.

    Pete
     
  6. Nov 27, 2015 #6

    Charles Lamont

    Charles Lamont

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    Monel comes in various grades, but they are all roughly 1/3 copper & 2/3 nickel, with very small amounts of other stuff. The main use in model and to a greater extent full size steam engines is as firebox stays in locomotive type boilers.
     
  7. Nov 28, 2015 #7

    Mark Rand

    Mark Rand

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    It is/was also used for brake pipes in cars when you didn't want them to rust through in a few years.Very good in that application.
     
  8. Nov 28, 2015 #8

    Cogsy

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    Just a thought - is it possible to cut the outside thread while it is still solid, then drill and tap the internal thread after? If you can do it in that order you have a better chance of the part staying in one piece.
     
  9. Nov 28, 2015 #9

    tornitore45

    tornitore45

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    Am I missing something?

    #10 major diameter = 0.190 regardless of TPI
    3/16 major diameter = 0.188

    How can you have a pipe threaded inside and outside with those two dimensions?

    The result is nothing but disconnected metal dust particles
     
  10. Nov 29, 2015 #10

    Tin Falcon

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    Hastelloy and inconel are similar High nickel alloys
    Tin
     
  11. Nov 30, 2015 #11

    werowance

    werowance

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    yes I should be able to, just the plans say to do it opposite, but it also says to start your threads on the lathe then finish with a die. I just cant thread with my lathe right now due to a chipped gear.

    but ill give that a try. tried stainless with tap inside first, then die outside second this weekend and failed. but hopefully reverse will work. I have plenty of that ss rod and its a very small part so I can keep on trying.

    thanks for the suggestion.
     
  12. Nov 30, 2015 #12

    werowance

    werowance

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    forgive me, instead of #10 its #6 I didn't have the plans in front of me when I posted

    here is the link to the popular science article
    https://books.google.com/books?id=Z...pular science turn yourself a lighter&f=false
     
  13. Nov 30, 2015 #13

    rklopp

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    Other than high nickel content, not really. Hastelloy is largely nickel and molybdenum, inconel is largely nickel and chromium, and monel is largely nickel and copper. There are various flavors of each with different main and minor alloy contents.
     
  14. Nov 30, 2015 #14

    Cogsy

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  15. Apr 21, 2016 #15

    cynthiamyra

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    Monel metal is a copper and nickel alloy containing 65-70 percent nickel, 20-29 percent of copper and small amounts of iron, manganese, silicon and
    carbon. It was discovered by Robert Crooks Stanley, who
    worked for the International Nickel Company (INCO) in 1905. It is stronger than steel, malleable, resistant to corrosion, has low coefficient of thermal expansion, highly resistant to alkalis. It can be easily brazed, welded and soldered. It is used in sheet and plate ductwork, flashing, gutters and downspouts, mail chutes, laundry chutes, elevator fittings, lighting fixtures, and skylights.
     

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