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Werowance attempts Upshur Vertical Single

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werowance

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Sproket, thank you for that i have always done it oposite start with the smallest drill and work my way up. yes i agree i get "up tight" when drill a long hole with a .040 drill.. didnt know it was acceptable to do it oposite. would probably reduce my drill breakage alot.
 

Richard Hed

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Interesting on the use of a die - I almost never use a die to create a thread; instead I virtually always single-point it. Sometimes I may use a die to finish it off, especially if I need to get as close as possible to a shoulder. My practice may reflect the fact that the vast majority of the dies that I have on hand are the cheap carbon steel import specials that I bought at the very beginning ... or maybe the fact that I've never upgraded to better dies reflects the fact that I always single-point. Hmm, chicken or egg ...
I learned a long time ago to use taps and dies when the threads are small and to use taps and dies also if I have quality ones for the larger threads. Single point when one doesn't have a die or they are too expensive to buy. In my opinion it is better to use the tool made for the job but if it is too expensive, find another way.
 

Ken I

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If I need to thread up to a shoulder, I'll normally "cheat" by tapping a hole and locktiting in a stud - gives you the benefit of being able to use a high tensile rolled thread stud (grub screw or cut from a cap screw or threaded rod).

As in this example of a clevis pin (M2 thread) which is much quicker and easier to make as parts :-

clevispin.jpg

It's also a lot stronger than undercutting and uses an off the shelf nut rather than having to machine a hexagon.

Regards, Ken
 
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werowance

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Well carburator is done. not much more drama after i found the bad die. only issue was the solder from the needle did stick the the main needle part to the jet tube. re heated that used my welding gloves and got it back apart. then cleaned all that up and sooted everything with accetaline soot and tried again. success and all done.

moved on to the head where i blued it to see if the push rods would rub, they just barely did, filed and sanded the cooling fin just a tad and thats all good.

next is a gas tank. mocked up several pieces of round stock and it seems 1 inch to 1.25 is going to be a good size for it. unfortunately i dont have anything in that size in copper or brass so ill be going to the hardware store tomorrow. (i have solid stock brass but im not going to waste that)
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the next pic shows it on the intake tube which is over length right now. i still have to shorten it

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and this pic show where the push rod was rubbing. it was just faint but i scribed a line across the top as a file to line then gave a little relief to that area, filed, sannded and it looked better than it did before.

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Sprocket

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I went to the hardware store looking for fuel tank parts, and by the time I'd found a couple of iron pipe end caps and a short nipple, I thought, "holy crap! it's a pipe bomb! hope the checkout guy doesn't call the police." But really, a couple of copper end caps make a very tidy looking fuel tank, and easier than trying to put flat ends on a piece of tube.
Your carb looks good.
Doug
 

awake

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Don't know if it matters, or would make it easier, but I usually drill the largest diameter hole first, then only have a little way to go with smaller drills.
They are going to center on the point of he other drill anyway, and I don't like drilling any deeper than I have to with tiny drills.
Doug
Yes, I should have mentioned this - the point of having the larger diameter (.0625") hole in the fuel feed side was precisely to avoid having to drill that whole length in .040". I drilled the .0625" first, then just had a short ways to go with the .040" drill.
 

werowance

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went and got a state inspection sticker on the vehicle this morning then stopped by the local non chain hardware store. one of the last few in America left i would say. got a 1.25 sinc or similar drain pipe. chrome plated but brass core. got a start on a fuel tank. roughly 2.25 long and 1.27 dia more like 1.26 after sanding found a very thin piece of scrap that had just enugh meat to make one of the ends. still scrounging for the other end scrap

kind of wanted to do this one different but i may change my mind after i keep looking around the scrap but what i was thinking of is that both the fill cap and the feed nipple feed out from the side cap. on the filler neck maybe a 90 or 2 - 45 to make a 90. maybe even use copper tube and bend a 90? make an external threaded bung to solder on that tube? i dont know still thinking on it. id really like to do cap that was a direct 90 deg to the tank but a milled piece of solid stock maybe .376 with something like a 30 deg angel on it. then drill a hole down a hole into the tank at right angles. ill do a crude paint image further below what im talking about. doubt i end up doing that.

so here is what i bought
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What i cut out of it and cleaned up with a rough cap on one side

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then kind of what i was thinking of how to do the filler cap into the side instead of into the tank body -a crude pant drawing.
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werowance

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i also should say that i want to mount this one on a vertical rod to make it adjustable as i saw another member here do. said i was going to use that one in a future project so i plan to do it n this one. but point here is why i want everything on the edge instead of the middle. the other members if i remember right had a split hole with a clamp screw to secure the tank and a hole and set screw to slide it up and down the tank (very crudely described. the members finished tank looked awesome) but if i remember right the fill neck was center of tank thus the clap had to be off center. figured a edge or at least offset filler neck and pickup / andor sump on the far left or right would do better for that clamp
 

werowance

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gas tank on a stick is done. had originally planed to use a bored piece of aluminum plate with a split to make a clamped part for it as i saw another user do this year on this site (and said i was going to steal that idea) which is why i wanted a side fill neck and feed nipple. but just before i started driling the aluminum plate i found little square chunk of brass in the tool box and it was almost the right size to solder on to the side of the tank thus eliminating a whole lot of extra work making the aluminum clamp. but still happy to have explored the side fill and side feed tank.

so the base plate is temp, its just my swiss cheese test drill/thread scrap plate for now. the fly wheel of this engine extends beyond the base plate of the engine so i will need a second base plate with a cutout or use a wood base with a cutout. i have a huge piece of scrap aluminum plate. i think it was part of the base of a large gas station sign or something roughly 1 inch thick, about 19 inches x 19 inches square and 4 very large bolt holes in it. spent a couple hours sawing a chunk out of it and started squaring it up in the mill. at any rate just know that the tank base plate is just for testing and the rod on the tank is still a bit long at this point.

not a beutiful job but hopefully ill be able to polish it up with the dremil and hand sanding/polishing



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werowance

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all that said. once that extra base plate is done then ill be ready to do the final fits and lock tight and silicone the crank case plates. all sorts of adjusting and such then try to start it. im thinking the machining is done after the extra base plate. if not it wont be anything major unless i find something wrong.
 

werowance

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got the base squared up and cut out for the fly wheel. spent the rest of the day rough sanding it to get the pits and scrapes etc out of it. needs a progressive rough to smoote sand from here but good enough for now. guess its time to start fit clean and finish?

a question on finish, it appears Mr. Upshur painted the cylinder/plate in a gloss back. i know mine needs pain cause its staring to just surface rust between the fins. what paint would you use on a hot cylinder? regular high temp engine paint or a higher temp?

ill drill for the gas tank rod once everything is fitted up a bit more. will hopefully sand and polish it a bit more as well.

if you notice the off set drill holes for the engine, that threw me at first to when measuring where to put them. i realized the cylinder/flywheel is not center of the base. its offset a bit to allow for the cam and tappets so thats why the base holes arent center to the cutout for the flywhell

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Brian Rupnow

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I don't really have a problem with rust here, so it's a bit hard to answer your question. Painting a cylinder will interfere with it's ability to radiate heat away, but I would try stovepipe enamel. Two choices, black or silver. Normal engine paint will not withstand the heat from an air cooled cylinder.
 

werowance

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finishing up is going ok so far. the locktight doing as expected, about 5 mins to seize up on steel to steel (the first cam lobe) and about 2 mins for brass to steel (the spacers or for tonight the first spacer) will test run clocking the 2nd cam lobe a bit hopefully tomorrow and see if any issues come up with a fake locktighting / clocking session before i put the green stuff on it.

other than that, im eye balling a ultrasonic jewelry cleaner similar to what i have seen a few users on this site use but thought i would ask, will the ultrasonic cleaners damage the green locktight after its cured? (dont know about the ultrasonic or chems damaging the locktight) anyway looking at one on amazon.com and thought id ask.

then on a very un related note. i need to change oil on my old farmall super a (c113 engine) and originally the oil plug had a copper crush washer/felt in a groove sealing washer. which has pretty much decentigrated since 1946. i have used oring and then ruberized gasket material as possible replacement. any sources to get the copper/felt or maybe leather (not sure) washers for an oil plug? ill fire up another thread in the tools or misc forrum if we need to. just looking for a vendor or website is all. and of course i can ask on the farmall forrum on another site but i have learned that many on this site know where to get these older types of gasket washers. many even know how to make them but im just wanting to buy a few for the toolbox and the tractor
 
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werowance

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thanks Gartof, but the hits i got were not what i was looking for, but only spent about 30 mins looking. was hoping someone had already been through it. before spring i will likely travel for work about 200 miles north to one of our locations and there happens to be a dealer there. but ill need to call ahead so they order the right part number for my tractor. unfortunatly the local international/farmall dealer shut down and they are the next closest one. but directly across the street.
 

werowance

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i hope i got the cam lobes clocked properly. printed off and resized a degree wheel to do it. last night i set the first lobe and then tonight i set the second and its curing now. in once sense the cold is working to my benifit.

the lock tight doesnt cure nearly as quick when its cold so i have more time to work with it. once it set enough to move it i brought it back in the house to cure at a better temp.

pic of the degree wheel setup - the copper wire is my pointer

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werowance

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i need some help please. in the assembly instructions below, im not sure i understand it. if i represent each cam lobe with a \ or a / depending on the lobe which if i show it like this " \ /" would mean both cams pointing upward in an even fashion. and if i say "/ \" would be both cams pointing down in an even fashion. and this " | " would be the piston rod and piston at top dead center. then in the instructions below is it saying i should orient the cam shaft in a position like this " \ | / " ?
it also says to un mesh the gears and rotate until you can get what i assume is this " \ | / " but the crankshaft gear is 30 tooth and if i do my math correct (Brian R showed me this on my webster build) that you take 360 divide it by the number of teeth 30 and you get 12 degrees per tooth that you move it. well thats alot to just try to time it by the gear teeth. i havnt locked the cam gear yet so i hopefully can get it exact but its brass to steel which the locktight will sieze in just a couple of mins. then it says to favor the rear follower rising early if you cant get it exact - well wouldnt that mean the cam on the oposite end of the fly wheel side? im thinking yes but just double checking

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and a picture to show what i mean by \ | / below
by the written instructions, would this how i need the cam shaft to be set with the piston tdc?

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Brian Rupnow

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Rotate the engine in whichever direction you want it to turn with the piston on it's upward stroke and stop it at about 20 degrees before top dead center. Loosen off the set screw on the intake cam and turn it in the proper direction until all the slack is taken out of the valve train and it is ready to start lifting the valve if it goes any farther. Lock that cam in position. Rotate the crankshaft in it's normal direction until about 25 degrees below bottom dead center. Loosen the set screw in the exhaust cam and rotate it to the point where it is ready to lift the valve and lock it there. that should be all there is to it.
 

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