Up in flames....no pun intended.

Discussion in 'Mistakes, Blunders and Boo Boos' started by cwkelley75, Aug 9, 2012.

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  1. Aug 24, 2018 #21

    Cymro77

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    Fascinating stuff! Thanks y'all for sharing your often hard earned wisdom!
     
  2. Aug 24, 2018 #22

    deverett

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    I remember as a young lad still at school, we could buy magnesium ribbon from the local chemist. It was great fun to ignite it and see the bright white flame! The ribbon (from memory) was about 12" long and because of the cost to us lads, we never thought about trying to extinguish it.

    Dave
    The Emerald Isle
     
  3. Aug 25, 2018 #23

    XD351

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    Or roll the legs up to shorten them !
    I was up a ladder oxy cutting something off the side of the building where i worked and next thing i know is someone is hosing me ! I though it was a joke until they told me i was on fire ! I used to roll up the legs of my overalls because they were too long and this created a catch point for hot sparks !
    At the same company i used to operate a big linisher for polishing rollers , it used to catch fire all the time as the steel dust would ignite from the hot sparks coming off the linishing belt . The hardchrome tanks used to bang every so often and the big tank went bang one day and put a bulge in the tin roof !
     
  4. Aug 25, 2018 #24

    Cogsy

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    This brought back a memory. Our shift supervisor was up in a man cage on forklift to oxy cut a ladder off the wall. The oxy set was on the ground and got showered in sparks as he was cutting, unnoticed by him of course. In short order the acetylene hose burned through and ignited and we had a nasty fire and explosion potential, so we all turned and began to run instinctively, including the forklift driver who had jumped from his machine. So my poor supervisor was suspended in cage with no way down over a flaming acetylene set! Luckily for him, I realised his driver had bailed and I returned to fight the fire, eventually smothering it with my leather gloves. We laughed about it later but it was scary at the time.
     
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  5. Aug 25, 2018 #25

    Tigercat200

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    A friend of mine was an aircraft mechanic since before World War II. When the permanent press work clothes came out his wife bought him a couple of sets. They worked fine until the day he was welding on steel tube airplane with an oxy-acetylene torch. It popped, as they do and he saw a spark hit his leg and he brushed it off as soon as it hit. There was a hole melted in the pants. He shut down the torch, went home, changed into jeans and a cotton shirt, and never wore permapress again. The possibilities of what could have happened were frightening.

    There's been mention of dust explosions. Back in the late 70s I was on a rescue squad. We had to have a helicopter put us on the roof of a grain elevator that blew up so we could go down to retrieve the injured. A scary day. Fortunately, elevator explosions are less frequent than they were when I was a boy in Illinois. A grain elevator is a dangerous environment for many reasons.

    You all be safe out there.
     
  6. Aug 25, 2018 #26

    Anatol

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    Thanks everyone for an informative (and scary) thread.
     
  7. Aug 27, 2018 #27

    Timehunter

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    One of the best kindling pieces for starting a fire is part of an 8" big fluffy old used polishing pad from a bench grinder type polisher.
    I had repaired one and had it sitting on the floor way back under the workbench.
    Was mig welding and I guess a bb landed on it.
    When I finished I kept smelling something smoldering-burning smell.
    Found it.
    Danged if I didn't do it again a couple days later after I thought I had covered it up enough.
    After that it was put on the other side of the shop.
     
  8. Aug 27, 2018 #28

    Chiptosser

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    I know that experience! Damd spark grabbers.
     
  9. Sep 2, 2018 #29

    MRA

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    I set my groovy nylon (?) steel-toe trainers on fire at work the other day with the plasma cutter - concentrating too hard on trying to keep a straight line. Leather and heavy cotton for me from now on :) And we don't do anything hot for the last hour before home time, just in case something starts to smoulder...
     
  10. Sep 3, 2018 #30

    Gordon

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    My dad was doing some welding at home after he retired. He had never done much welding before that. He came running in the house and told my mother "I know why Gordon wears cotton socks instead of these nylon socks"
     

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