Toolpost Grinders

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Brian Rupnow

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How many of you have toolpost grinders? This seems to be a misnomer, because 90% of what is available requires that you remove the topslide and mount the grinder to the compound rest. They don't really fit on the toolpost at all. What do you use them for? How often do you use them? Every once in a while I get the urge to buy one, but honestly, the only thing I can think of using them for is to part of sections of cast iron tubing to make piston rings, or to grind the face of a valve. I don't generally have problems with valves not sealing although the quality of a tool turned valve face looks fairly horrible under magnification but proper lapping into the valve seat seems to work good enough to make the valve seal well. I can't really think of any situation where I would use inside grinding capability. They range in price from $200 for the Little Machine Shop style, up to $3000 for the Dumore brand.---Brian
 

Gordon

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Take a look at this. It may fit your needs.


I have a Dumore which I got quite a few years ago when I was still in business. Bankruptcy was closing in on one of my customers who owed me money and I got this before the bank got there. Interestingly I also got half a cow for my freezer one step ahead of the bank from a farmer who owed me money.
 

DJoksch

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I also have a vintage Dumore. I made a mount that slips in and replaces the quick change tool post. It’s a little big for my South Bend 10L. I last used it to make a mandrel for forming bassoon bocals at the old shop. I’ve used it only once in 15 years.

 

Brian Rupnow

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That is my biggest fear---That I'll spend a crap-load of money on something that I wouldn't ever really use. I have a fairly good collection of machinist tools and measuring instruments, most of which I use frequently.
 

DiegoVV

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Have you watched Clough42's series of videos on building a grinder that fits an Aloris style post? I made myself one and it works like a charm. Anyway, having a surface grinder, next project will be a cylindrical grinding attachment.
 

Brian Rupnow

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Diego--I just watched the final video in the series. He did a good job on the toolpost grinder. I wouldn't build one as a project. I'm almost 75 years old, and I'd never live long enough to get pay back on the time invested in building one.
 

Nerd1000

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My grandfather uses a 5" angle grinder strapped to the toolpost with hose clamps. Sketchy as, but it works in a pinch when you need to machine down something that's too hard to cut with a turning tool.

A word of caution: cover the ways when using a grinder over them. There's few faster ways to kill a lathe than charging the bottom of the saddle with abrasives.
 

SmithDoor

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I have Dunmore it was made for 9" size lathe. I have South Bend 9A and works great but I too only usevabout 10 years.
I havevown since 1973 hard to some work with out a tool post grinder.

Dave

I also have a vintage Dumore. I made a mount that slips in and replaces the quick change tool post. It’s a little big for my South Bend 10L. I last used it to make a mandrel for forming bassoon bocals at the old shop. I’ve used it only once in 15 years.

 

goldstar31

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I still have my Bosch POF45 and a cheap Chinese wood router.
Basically, things have changed in the last 50 or so years when designs for amateur workers were published by people like Ian Bradley and Jack Radford. Again, there is now a plthora of tool and cutter grinders of varying quality but GOD lathes- and I mean Accurate ones with adjustable feed dials have minimised the need for 'tool post grinders' many of whom have gone into liquidation or bankruptcy:(
Revised designs in the past 50 years have vastly improved the potential accuracy of cutting tools.
Adequate( for most purposes) tools can be ground quite cheaply but high performing tool and cutter grinders- are now high-er performing but are quite expensive even in kit form.
What is available in 'ready to use' form but unsuitable to fit on lathe saddles is the Chinese Deckel clone.
No, it isn't the answer to a maiden's prayer(;)) but it does offer opportunities to re-grind both hss and carbide tooling.
My options-- but I have the bloody things --- mumble mumble

Norman
 

TSutrina

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How many of you have toolpost grinders? This seems to be a misnomer, because 90% of what is available requires that you remove the topslide and mount the grinder to the compound rest. They don't really fit on the toolpost at all. What do you use them for? How often do you use them? Every once in a while I get the urge to buy one, but honestly, the only thing I can think of using them for is to part of sections of cast iron tubing to make piston rings, or to grind the face of a valve. I don't generally have problems with valves not sealing although the quality of a tool turned valve face looks fairly horrible under magnification but proper lapping into the valve seat seems to work good enough to make the valve seal well. I can't really think of any situation where I would use inside grinding capability. They range in price from $200 for the Little Machine Shop style, up to $3000 for the Dumore brand.---Brian
I have a Themac tool post grinder that came with the Atlas 10 F lathe. Finally thru a hobby site like this I found out were to get a belt. Didn't get wheels. Have not needed to use it yet. It does fit on the cross slide and I remember seeing it mounted on the lathe when my father was using it. Never saw it running. No guards built since 1936.
 

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stanstocker

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I seldom need to do the things tool post grinders are good for. When I had a clock restoration business I often used a flex shaft tool free hand to polish / chamfer / grind stuff held in the lathe chuck. A C clamp will hold a flex shaft hand piece nicely in the slot of a tool holder in place of a tool bit on the rare occasion a more tool post grinder like set up is needed. Sure, it's sort of a cobbled together solution and it hangs out a bit, but it meets my needs.

There are a lot of things most small shop folks just don't need, or in most cases can't afford without giving up something (space, money. other tools, vacations) more important to us.

There's almost always an effective enough work around in the small shop, where so many of our efforts are one off or make to fit items. I've polished journals with a hinged pair of hardwood sticks with a hole in the middle and lapping compound on occasion. Utterly silly in a commercial or production shop, but fine and dandy out in my little shop :)

Stan
 
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Brian, I purchased a Tool Post Grinder a Dumore many years ago...hardly use it as afterwords, one has to tear
apart the chuck to clean out all of the grit...it has now been years since it was last on my lathe...

But, I did purchase a Cincinatti #1 Tool and Cutter Grinder about 5000 pounds and a Brown and Sharp #1
Cylinderical Grinder about 6000 pounds and use both almost daily...as I do not need to clean up for they
are designed for grinding...

I for one would not waste the money on a Tool Post Grinder unless you just have many projects that require
that degree of surface finish or tolerance...and most lathes will not hold those tolerances anyway...

Best Regards,

Preston
 

Charles Lamont

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On the rare occasions I have needed to grind in the lathe I use either a Dremel or an air-driven die-grinder. I made a 'toolholder' adaptor for the die grinder when I needed to regrind slightly bell-mouthed chuck jaws. The last job I did that way was grinding rubber - messy but effective.


(Link updated, thanks to Norman for his post below)
 
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goldstar31

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On the rare occasions I have needed to grind in the lathe I use either a Dremel or an air-driven die-grinder. I made a 'toolholder' adaptor for the die grinder when I needed to regrind slightly bell-mouthed chuck jaws. The last job I did that way was grinding rubber - messy but effective.

I'm using an Apple Mac and your refce is forbidden but trying to get you at your website proper, I did see 'some' nice bits'

I look forward to enjoying the rest

regards




Norman
 

Canyonman

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I use a Foredom "Handpiece" in a boring tool holder. Yea kinda cobbled but I haven't had much need.
I have a T&C Grinder for tool bits. Ken
 

IanN

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How many of you have toolpost grinders?
:
What do you use them for? How often do you use them? Every once in a while I get the urge to buy one, but...
---
Hi Brian,

This apears to be working "backwards" - usually the process goes "Here is what I'm trying to do, but I don't have the tooling. Any recommendations...."

The original post seems to be saying "I want to buy something, I don't actually need it - in fact I can't think of anything I would use it for. What do people recommend?"

So I would like to suggest something you may be interested in: Sittng in my garage is my old BSA 500 (B33 with plunger suspension - not 'sporty', more a 'work horse', fit a plough to it and you could use it on the farm). It has been in bits for the last 34 years, most of the parts are probably still there, ran like a dream in the late 60s, got a bit ropey in the 70s, became a struggle in the 80s so I switched to using the car and the bike has been a "work in progress" ever since

Ideal purchase if you want to buy something which serves no useful purpose and you can't think of why you need it, (and it doesn't fit on the toolpost either)

In fact I have a lot of things in the garage which fit the above description and with my advancing years our children/grandchildren are beginning to show concern that they will end up inheriting them....

Have fun,
ian
 
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