Toolmakers clamps

Discussion in 'Tools' started by bazmak, Mar 13, 2017.

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  1. Mar 13, 2017 #1

    bazmak

    bazmak

    bazmak

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    Spurred on by Joco-nz and his excerlent thread I decided to make a pair
    Purely for nostalgic reasons I decided to make a pair the same as made
    55 yrs ago in the apprentice school although I did like joco idea of turning
    the taper.However I tried to make them the same as I did 55 yrs ago with
    a folded metal retaining brkt.Eventually this did deviate as work progressed
    and I made changes to suit what materials I had.Here they are,but the photos
    are nowhere near as good as joco-nz[​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  2. Mar 13, 2017 #2

    tornitore45

    tornitore45

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    Looking good, but when both threads are RH is awkward to open/close by twirling one knob around the other since one screw wind IN and the other OUT.
    When that happens the screw with the black knob may come out of the hole.
     
  3. Mar 13, 2017 #3

    bazmak

    bazmak

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    think that is incorrect Mauro,by gripping both knobs and rotating one way or the other like a hand held fishing spool they rapidly open or closes the clamp.From memory of 55 yrs ago
    and practiced with these. Still works a treat
     
  4. Mar 13, 2017 #4

    tornitore45

    tornitore45

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    Brain fart:hDe: You are correct.
    I was thinking one screw threads IN on the other OUT, but that is exactly what we want to keep the jaws parallel.
    I have several, and they work fine but sitting at the computer is not as being in the shop handling the stuff.
     
  5. Mar 13, 2017 #5

    joco-nz

    joco-nz

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    What style router bit did you use? Rpms, depth of cut and lubrication? I wanted to do the rounded ends but wasnt sure on applying a carbide wood router bit to steel. I have heard of it done with aluminum.

    Cheers.
     
  6. Mar 13, 2017 #6

    John S

    John S

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    That's the problem with Joco design in that they can't be opened and closed fast with both knobs on the same side.
    Bazmac's design is the classic design that has worked well for centuries.
     
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  7. Mar 13, 2017 #7

    bazmak

    bazmak

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    Router bits are cheap sets that I bought for woodwork.Decided to give them a try on other threads.Started with alum and then brass.Work well fast speed
    and light to medium cuts.Used the OG bits for putting a fancy corner to
    engine baseplts.
    Then gave it try,still works well lower feed and speed with light cuts
    Bit noisy and bouncy if you try too deep a cut but have not yet to sharpen or have any broken cutters.Used the radius,chamfer and dovetail cutters
    successfully so far.Its just a matter of trial and error and see what you can do
    It was noted that you fitted both knobs to the same side of the clamps.This is
    not the best way,fit knobs to opp. sides this gives fast adjustment by winding the clamps
     
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  8. Mar 14, 2017 #8

    joco-nz

    joco-nz

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    Re the router bits - thanks. I'll give my cheap carbide ones a crack. I'll save the Diablo brand ones I have.

    Re the clamps - yes I know they are fitted to one side and that was deliberate per the Harold Hall design and observations on that style. I intend to make some pairs that follow the classical design as well. First rule - there can never be too many clamps. :thumbup:
     
  9. Mar 14, 2017 #9

    BaronJ

    BaronJ

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    Hi Barry,

    Very nicely done. I have a pair of Moore & Wright ones and a pair that I made about thirty years ago. Nowhere as nice are yours though.
     
  10. Mar 14, 2017 #10

    bazmak

    bazmak

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    I remember taking exams with time off school to gain acceptance for my first job.When accepted we were given a list of tools we MUST buy before starting
    6" rule,calipers,square, feeler gauges etc.All Moore and Wright of course
    By that brings back memories.Just looked thru my tool box still have most of them with my name engraved.18 mths in the apprentice school making excercises most of whick were tools to build up the tool box.All had to be the best we could do and marked of course.After 18mths if the marks were not up scratch you did not get to sign your indenture papers.A pair of toolmaker clamps were one of the excercises,all with name stamp and polished to high heaven before case hardenings and repolishing.I remember being warned
    about the case hardening department using cyanide and to be very careful
    We had to be on friendly terms with the bloke in there (for future Guvvy jobs0
    and I always remember him sitting next to the baths at lunchtime eating his sandwichs.I remember talking to him at his retirement
     
  11. Mar 15, 2017 #11

    Wizard69

    Wizard69

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    One thing that I've never been able to do us eat on the shop floor. Part of that is due to working in a foundry in my early years where you left just to cool off. Even after leaving the foundry i have made it a point to dine outside the shop, if nothing else it clears the mind.
     
  12. May 10, 2017 #12

    bazmak

    bazmak

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    I spent 2 weeks in the foundry and remember some of the old hands
    eating their sandwichs there.Not for me.In the sheetmetal shop it
    was next to the furnace we gathered,in winter of course.However the one I
    was most surprised at was the heat treatment plant,next to the cyanide bath
    I had a chat with the bloke at his retirement.40 yrs of fumes and not ill effects
     
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  13. May 10, 2017 #13

    mcostello

    mcostello

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    Worked with Guy that used to work in a slaughter shop. He ate His lunch on a dead cow. I am thankful for many small things and that is one of them.
     

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