Tim from Telford, UK

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Mike Ginn

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Hi Derrick
I had NSEW facing walls on a detached garage with no issues. I did however always check that there was no dew on the wooden up&over door which was on the E wall. If there was it was an indication of warmer outside air and potentially an issue with condensation on cold metals. Under these circumstanced I did not uncover the machines. The photos of the chucks showed that the method worked and BTW I have no rust on the lathe or mill beds. I realize now that the chucks are 50 years old - where did the time go!!!
Mike
 

Shopgeezer

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My west facing shop has never given me rust problems except for one exceptional humidity event in our normally dry western weather. A finger of air from the gulf coast of the US made it just far enough north to poke at us in western Canada. And just for one night. Of course all the shed windows were open. I walked in to the shop the next day and to my horror every machine and wood working tool was covered in a thin patina of rust. It took weeks of work to get things back to shiny and oiled. This was years ago and I still find the occasional drill or bolt with that thin coat of rust. How on earth do you run a shop in the deep south where humidity is through the roof every day?
 

awake

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How on earth do you run a shop in the deep south where humidity is through the roof every day?
Here in North Carolina (only medium-deep south, I suppose), I have had surprisingly little trouble with rust. I suspect part of the reason may be that the garage/shop is attached to the house, with part of the living space over the garage. As a result, the garage never gets as cold or as hot as it is outdoors.

Actually the situation that causes the most problem is during high summer, when I am sweating. I haven't had trouble with the machines "sweating," but human sweat drops on iron tools quickly equals rust spots.
 

kf2qd

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Like the plane. Was into that a few years ago and then life got in the way...

Get the biggest machine you can house. A small machine may seem like a good idea, but it will really limit what you can accomplish. Bigger also means more solid and stable. (and the knobs and switches are easier to get you big mitts on...) Enjoy and have fun.
 

Tim Hooper

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It's been a little while......

I had my very first encounter with a lathe yesterday evening! As mentioned earlier, I'd signed up for a short course of night school classes at the nearby Shrewsbury College, and yesterday was the day.

Over three hours, I managed to turn a lump of steel into the artifact you see here. Dimensionally, it's questionable. Surface finish is so-so. But, it's taking pride of place in the Hooper lounge, dammit!

Tim:cool:
 

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Steamchick

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Well done on selecting a sensible training place for getting started. Have you joined a local model engineering club? They probably have facilities where you can practice your skills and get more advice and training in your new hobby.
Must be one close to Telford - the heart of Engineering history.
K2
 
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