The beginners tool box

Discussion in 'Tools' started by Tin Falcon, Nov 17, 2012.

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  1. Nov 17, 2012 #1

    Tin Falcon

    Tin Falcon

    Tin Falcon

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    I began the getting started in model engineering thread a long time ago . It has grown and it is well read. I also did a thread on lathe selection . But since I often get the cart before the horse and overlook the obvious I am stating this thread. Please please help with this one .
    So here is the concept . we are going to set up machinist tools box suitable for the home shop machinist .

    so here are the guidelines : place a tool into this virtual tool box.
    (1) Limit one tool per thread . Three tools per person. Something that comes as a set is considered one tool.
    (2) This must be a tool you have in your shop and use, like and would recommend to a friend.
    (3) Post a photo of the tool. your photo or link to manufacturers or sellers web site. give credit for the photo if not yours.
    (4)list price and availabity as much as possible.
    (5) explain the tool ,its uses and what you like and limitations. Tell us why you think this is a must have tool for the tool box.
    (6) the focus here is filling the virtual tool box but you may post something that does not fit in the box.
    (7) I hope this to be a fun and educational experience for all.

    Tin
     
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  2. Nov 17, 2012 #2

    Tin Falcon

    Tin Falcon

    Tin Falcon

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    I will start with a tool box that is redily availble in the USA and I believe to be a good bang for the buck especially if you have a coupon .


    Name Eight Drawer Wood Tool Chest
    SKU 94538
    Brand Windsor Design
    Drawers 8
    Material Wood
    Shipping Volume 2.992
    Overall dimensions: 20" L x 10-1/2" W x 16" H
    Shipping Weight: 20.65 lbs.
    Import from China

    Manufacturer Warranty Detail 100% Satisfaction Guarantee! If for ANY reason you are not satisfied with this item, you may return it within 90 days for a full refund or replacement.

    regular price $99.99
    my price after coupon$ 59.99 40% discount.
    This is advertised as hardwood with a walnut stain.
    The box appears to be solid wood if there is any laminate it is well hidden. drawer bottoms masonite type material with IMHO a few too many staples holding then in. As far as walnut finish I am not seeing it looks more maple color to me.
    The hardware is advertised as chrome plated. It is there and looks good . The knobs on the display model appeared to be turned aluminum and had a home /shop made appearance. The single handle on the box is on the top a modem version of the handle on top of my vintage union box. There is no lid support in the till. Something that can be added like I did on my Travers import box. The item description mentions single key locking. this is a normal feature for such a box, but not true. this box has two locks each with a pair off keys, one for the till and a second lock for the drawer covers. There is an ugly do not remove this label label inside the drawer cover with the box serial number on it. The box is felt lined the Mrs says the felt is thin, not something I noticed.
    I mentioned drawer bottoms.In comparison my vintage union has tin plate steel for drawer bottoms. My Travers import box has thin ply wood that is captured by the drawer frame. My son's Grizzly box has masonite held with one staple . Remove the staple slide out the drawer bottom and replace with something better.The drawer bottoms on this one will slide out after removing the one staple per inch of drawer. arg.

    If you want Gershner Quality and can afford it buy a Gershner. if you want a value priced import to hold your hobby tools this is IMHO a good value. Add a lid support ,replace the drawer bottoms with aluminum or tinplate steel and you will have a pretty nice box.


    Harbor Freight stock Photo

    [​IMG]


    Thanks for reading. normal disclaimer no affiliations Yada Yada. caravat Emptor I inspected the condition of my box before leaving the store parking lot . I recommend the same for any similar purchase.
    Tin
     
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  3. Nov 17, 2012 #3

    Tin Falcon

    Tin Falcon

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    No. 563, 6 - Hermaphrodite Caliper, Firm-Joint, 6" (160mm)
    This is a tool That was in my USAF apprentice school tool box. Also this was one of the first tools I purchased for the home tool box, I use this tool primarily for marking shoulders when cutting on the lathe can also be used for marking where to part. this tool can also be used for marking lines and hole locations on flat stock that has smooth straight edges.

    New this item is $50 but I have purchased several from flea markets for IIRC $4-5 each.

    Photo from trancat tools.
    [​IMG]


    Tin
     
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  4. Nov 17, 2012 #4

    kvom

    kvom

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    6" steel rule (or metric equivalent). Lots of different makes, so I'm skipping pic.

    These can cost anywhere from $6 to $50 new, but I've found them for $1-2 apiece used.

    I look for the ones with fractional inch on one side and 1/100s on the other. This was the first machinists tool I purchased, and of course since I can never find anything in my shop I have since bought 6-7 more. There's usually one lying about in sight that way.

    Makes quick measurements easy, and are more flexible than calipers or micrometers in tight spaces. Well-made ones are extremely accurate (hence the preference for 100ths).
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2012
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  5. Nov 17, 2012 #5

    stevehuckss396

    stevehuckss396

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    Double ended edge and hole finder.

    I seem to always be looking for it.

    starrett_827B_lg.jpg
     
  6. Nov 17, 2012 #6

    peatrich

    peatrich

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    That looks really useful Steve but I have no idea what it does, even though you have described it.
    As a newby I am always looking for tools that increase my accuracy and would welcome a description of how it is used. Being a bit on the thick side of dim a couple of pictures might help me as well.

    Best regards
    Peter
     
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  7. Nov 17, 2012 #7

    stevehuckss396

    stevehuckss396

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    Try watching this video: [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUa_B6YIt_M[/ame]

    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f0od-cp_9dg[/ame]
     
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  8. Nov 18, 2012 #8

    Fluffy

    Fluffy

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    G'Day All,
    Here are some very simple but essential tools required for screwcutting vee & acme threads.
    The screw cutting gauges (often referred to as thread centring gauges) on the left are essential for grinding HSS tooling to the correct included angle of the vee thread form to be cut. Then used to set the cutting tool at 90˚ to the lathe axis prior to commencement of screwcutting. The top two left hand gauges are produced in either 55˚ or 60˚.The bottom left has included angles for metric, imperial, B.A. & acme thread forms. The gauge on the right is the equivalent for acme thread forms. It is also used to gauge tool size & included angle & then again to set the tool in the lathe.
    The cost of the vee thread gauges varies from around AUD$10.00 depending on the brand.
    The top two left gauges have been in my toolbox since the late 1960's.
    Don.

    DSCF3805.jpg
     
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  9. Nov 26, 2012 #9

    Propforward

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    Hi Tin,

    I realise that this post is not in keeping with how you want the thread to go, but I wanted to provide this link on the calipers you mention.

    http://www.jtsmach.com/jtswebshop/Measuring/PM199.asp

    Basically you can get these calipers from JTS machine supply for 5 to ten bucks. Please feel free to incorporate this link into your post and delete my post to keep the thread clean. (If you think the link is useful).

    They are also available from Travers

    http://www.travers.com/product.asp?eaprodid=63312%2D57%2D064%2D939&r=s&n=||UserSearch%3Dhermaphrodite+caliper||UserSearch1%3Dblock+id+63312+and+class+level3+id+29821

    I think this is a great idea for a thread. As a newcomer to this hobby I am looking for the "right" tools to get started. I have in fact picked up a couple of tools which I shall review per your guidelines this week, but I have to take pictures and so on, but I will add those posts in due course. Already this thread has given me some important pointers.

    I have not purchased hermaphrodite calipers from JTS yet, but I am planning on doing so. Going to pick up an edge finder as well!
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2012
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  10. Nov 26, 2012 #10

    RManley

    RManley

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    I work in imperial but almost never use my imperial drills. A metric box set in 0.1mm increments from 1mm to 10mm allows 4 thou steps. All you need is a simple chart on the wall and you're away.
    This allows you to get as close as you can to the magic 75% thread depth when tapping small holes, open holes out slowly and accurately to undersize stock, are perfect for using the blank end as plug gauges when boring holes and good for doing holes just before reaming to get the required cut depth.

    I cant tell you how much I would be lost without them.

    Rob. :)
     
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  11. Nov 26, 2012 #11

    Journeyman

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    A 0" to 1" (or 0mm to 25mm) Micrometer. These are readily available from most tool suppliers and range from a few £ / $ / € to quite a lot. The more you pay the better the quality. Moore & Wright, Starrett or Mitutoyo if you can afford. There are two basic types mechanical or digital. The newer digital types are easy to use and present an LCD readout which requires no interpretation but dont work once the battery goes flat (keep a spare handy) unless you can interpret the mechanical vernier readout. The older manual version requires a bit of math to read, especially the metric version, but needs the minimum of maintenance and is always ready to go.

    These are a couple of cheapo's from Amazon Not recommended

    Cheers John

    micrometer.jpg
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2012
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  12. Nov 26, 2012 #12

    GWRdriver

    GWRdriver

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    An automatic center punch. Some folks might want to get a magnifying glass or a "linen tester" (Google it) to go along with it. Very handy to have.

    Centrpunch.jpg
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2012
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  13. Nov 26, 2012 #13

    GWRdriver

    GWRdriver

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    A single point scriber. I use one constantly. I never had one with the carbide tip, always just the hardened steel and I could sharpen that to the point where it would stick you if you merely looked at it.

    Scriber.jpg
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2012
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  14. Nov 26, 2012 #14

    GWRdriver

    GWRdriver

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    One last nomination . . . a machinist's square set. I have a 4" (nominal ) set which has done everything I've ever needed to do regardless of size.

    I could maybe pull out 40 things I have in my tool boxes that I figured I would "have" to have to do what I want to do and over time what I discovered was that maybe 20 of them are hardly ever touched again, and 15 of them I only use every once in a while, but 5 or 6 of them I use almost constantly. My three nominations are, in no particular order, a few of the things I use almost constantly.

    square.jpg
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2012
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  15. Nov 27, 2012 #15

    Propforward

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    Here is a tool that I consider a "Must Have". It is actually a set - a set of squares.

    I was attempting to manage with only an adjustable square, and I was doing OK, but this set is really great, because having the 3 different sized squares really helps with a lot of set up jobs. Not just marking and laying out work, but checking squareness of jobs on my drill press for example, and using them to find edges of circualr parts, and also to set up other tools. I only bought this last week and already it has proven itself invaluable.

    The set comes in a basic but nice case, with rubber insert, and as well as 3 different sizes of square, includes a center square, scriber and 6" steel rule.

    These are photos of my actual set.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    I purchased this set through Grizzly - here is the link:

    http://www.grizzly.com/products/Center-Sq-Set-of-6/H5688

    Price $34.95 at time of writing, and in stock.

    I am very happy with this set. The only thing I don't especially like is the steel rule. Mainly because I already have better ones - I like to have fractional and decimal inch measurements on a rule, and a separate rule for metric. But otherwise there is nothing inherently wrong with the rule.

    I think squares such as these are a fundamental set up requirement in a shop, and I waited too long to acquire these.
     
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  16. Nov 27, 2012 #16

    Propforward

    Propforward

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    It seems to me that if you are going to do serious work in any kind of machine shop, whether small hobby or large industrial, you had better be serious about setting up, measuring and holding. That is becoming very apparent from the posts - and several good setup and measurement tools have been shown.

    Clamping is obviously extremely important, and another recent acquisition of mine is this clamping set, again from Grizzly. I really have been very pleased with the tools I have purchased from there.

    This is my actual set:

    [​IMG]

    The set includes: 24 studs, 6 step block pairs, 6 T-nuts, 6 flange nuts, 4 coupling nuts and 6 end hold-downs. I don't have a milling machine (yet), but already this kit has made it MUCH easier for me to quickly and effectively hold work securely and above all SAFELY on my drill press, and I can forsee its use in other applications too.

    The clamps and bolts themselves are well made, and everything comes very heavily oiled and wrapped in plastic to protect it during shipping and storage. The plastic rack is also included. That part of it is a little more "cheap", but it does the job. I don't know that I trust the plastic rack to be bolted to the wall, but I have it at the back of my workbench near the drill press, so all the parts are very quickly available - and it really is no trouble to assemble a safe set up on most jobs.

    The set is available in two versions with different T nuts (1/2" and 5/8"). The 1/2" set works a treat for me.

    Linky:

    http://www.grizzly.com/products/52-pc-Clamping-Kit-for-1-2-T-slots/G1075

    $37.95 and in stock at the time of writing. Another purchase I am happy that I made.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2012
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  17. Nov 28, 2012 #17

    TroyO

    TroyO

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    I've always been a fan of "Dollar stores" or anything that is $1or less, so here is my "Cheapskate drawer" of must have tools. I am considering this a "set" because they all come from the same place...any $1 store! I will limit it to $10 though:

    1,2,3 ) Permanent marker. Blue, Red and Black. Not for drawing, but rather as a handy way to "dye" a metal surface for use with the hermaphrodite calipers, single point scribe or center punch listed above. (Get singles of the good brands) (Stock Image, Dollar Tree)
    [​IMG]
    4 ) Cheap plastic triangle squares... use in places the machinist square won't or shouldn't go. If they "get in the way" just cut through them.... who cares? (Stock Image, Amazon)
    [​IMG]
    5 ) Dry erase "pad". I use one all the time to jot down measurements, important notes, reminders etc. (Stock Image, Dollar Tree)
    [​IMG]

    6 ) Pill organizer to hold itty bitty parts as you work on things. (Stock Image, Dollar Tree)
    [​IMG]

    7 ) Pen/Pencil holders designed for office desks work just as well for markers, scribes and center punches. Look for metal mesh ones.... you can easily shake out metal chips. (Stock Image, Dollar Tree)
    [​IMG]

    8 ) Calculators! My favorite has a carabineer style clip and I have one clipped on the mill, the tool box, the drill, etc. (Stock Image, Dollar Tree)
    [​IMG]
    9 ) A recent find, worth looking for… magnetic vent covers. They are designed to block off heating vents, but are just 6”x12” refrigerator magnet material.Use them on your lathe bed/mill table to keep swarf out of the T-slots. (Stock Image, Amazon)
    [​IMG]
    10 ) Graph paper. Remember when we used to draw out ideas and write in measurements by hand? Yeah…. I still do that.(Stock image, Amazon)
    [​IMG]

    I hope that is still in keeping with the spirit of the thread!
     
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  18. Nov 28, 2012 #18

    Motormagican

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    As a new member and a builder without a lathe, I think the information youhave put here is very useful. I too only use pencil and paper for my brass models.I also use a metal multiple calibrated ruler. One day I may try CAD or someother type of drafting program. I have started keeping track of all the parts Idesign for the build in a note book. In the past I make a part and throw thediagram in the trash.

    Thank you for the good information and if you post more I will keep looking.


    Thanks to all the builders I am learning a lot from each post.:D
     
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  19. Nov 28, 2012 #19

    TroyO

    TroyO

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    My next "tool" is a book... Machinery's Handbook *pocket companion*.

    About $20, this is much cheaper than the full "Machinery's Handbook" and has almost all the charts and calculations you will need. Sure, the $100 full hardcover book is a great reference, but leave it inside on a nice clean bookshelf and toss the pocket companion in to the toolbox. (Stock Image, Amazon)

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0831129115/ref=olp_product_details?ie=UTF8&me=&seller=

    [​IMG]

    (Note, mine has a gold cover but I'd swear I got it for ~$20 new too... for some reason Amazon has it listed for ~$195 used... must be a typo.)
     
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  20. Nov 28, 2012 #20

    TroyO

    TroyO

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    My third tool for the collection I chose mostly for it's sheer versatility. From deburring, to correcting mistakes and even taking the place of many specialty cutters (If you are willing to grunt a little) a general set of hand files can't be beat for overall get-er-done effectiveness. (Stock image, Amazon) $35-ish. The better the file, the less the grunt.

    [​IMG]
     
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