Spoked flywheel for the Webster

Discussion in 'A Work In Progress' started by deere_x475guy, Feb 3, 2008.

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  1. Feb 3, 2008 #1

    deere_x475guy

    deere_x475guy

    deere_x475guy

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    With all the talk about spoke flywheels going on I decided I would make mine today. It's a little bigger than the plans called for but I figured I needed the weight because I am using aluminum. I used Marv's flywheel program to get me started. I have to fess up though the 5 1/4" holes that are in near the Hub shouldn't be there....I didn't start at 36 degrees like the print out called for. I started at 0....DUH... At least it ended up between the webbing and I was able to duplicate the screw up with just drilling 4 more holes 72 degrees apart.:)))

    First I milled out the narrow part of the flywheel
    [​IMG]


    Then I drilled all my holes using a 1/4" drill
    [​IMG]

    Then I milled the excess material between the holes
    [​IMG]


    Here's what I ended up with.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Feb 3, 2008 #2

    Brass_Machine

    Brass_Machine

    Brass_Machine

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    Hey Bob,

    Thats pretty sharp. I like.


    Eric
     
  3. Feb 3, 2008 #3

    Bernd

    Bernd

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    Nice looking flywheel there Bob. Now that makes me want a rotary table. This could be bad for the machine shop buget. ;D

    Bernd
     
  4. Feb 3, 2008 #4

    Powder keg

    Powder keg

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    Just tell people those are "Speed Holes" They make the engine "run better" No one will second guess the builder LOL

    Great job! Wes
     
  5. Feb 3, 2008 #5

    mklotz

    mklotz

    mklotz

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    I'm pleased to see that the program worked for you - even if you tried to outsmart it. :)

    Actually, I kind of like the extra holes in the webs. Gives it a sort of 'racing' look.

     
  6. Feb 5, 2008 #6

    SignalFailure

    SignalFailure

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    Nice Bob, wish I had the gear to make such a thing.

    I think the extra holes look just fine - if you hadn't fessed up I would have been none the wiser!

    There's a mechanical method for achieving a similar result in the plans for this Elmers engine...

    http://www.john-tom.com/ElmersEngines/24_beam.pdf
     
  7. Feb 5, 2008 #7

    tattoomike68

    tattoomike68

    tattoomike68

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    I have made some Bonus holes in my years of working.

    I just tell the customer. "no extra charge" [​IMG]
     
  8. Feb 6, 2008 #8

    mklotz

    mklotz

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    Interestingly, the test piece for the program was exactly this flywheel. I happened to have some brass of the right dimension and this was the first tapered-spoke wheel I found in my project book. I had no intention of building the engine - just wanted to test the program - but the flywheel looked so pretty after doing it that I decided to go ahead and build the engine to display it.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Feb 6, 2008 #9

    rake60

    rake60

    rake60

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    I DID intend to build Elmer's Beam Engine.

    I had no rotary table or program to make the flywheel.
    Holes were laid out using a simple formula and a a calculator.

    B = D x sin( 360 / (2 x N))
    where
    B = distance between bolt holes
    D = diameter of bolt circle
    N = number of holes in circle


    It may have not been the correct or safe way, but it went kind of like this.
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    It's nothing to brag about, but it worked for me....

    Great stuff here guys! I've worked with a lot of old salts who could lay out
    a bolt circle with a set of dividers quicker that I can write a program to
    gain the same results.

    My point is, if you really want to make it you CAN!

    Rick
     
  10. Feb 6, 2008 #10

    SignalFailure

    SignalFailure

    SignalFailure

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    Well I'm glad to see some of you guys have made Elmer's Beam - as a relative noob I'll be asking some questions when I start mine no doubt ;) I have to do a conversion to metric first though and I plan to build it at about twice the size...ouch!

    Paul
     
  11. Feb 6, 2008 #11

    gilessim

    gilessim

    gilessim

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    Rick, nice work! but how did you make those circular cuts without a rotary table?

    Marv, how do I get your programs to run on my mac? I see that most of them are not in dos, do you know of a utility to run them on a mac?

    Giles

     
  12. Feb 6, 2008 #12

    mklotz

    mklotz

    mklotz

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    Giles,

    Most of them ARE written to run under DOS but will execute just fine under Windows.
    I run them here at home under XP pro.

    I know nothing of Macs. There must be Windows emulators for Macs. Most (not all) of the programs don't do any fancy memory manipulation so I would expect them to run under an emulator. But, then, what do I know?

    Rick,

    I too want to know how you cut those arcs without a rotary table.
     
  13. Feb 6, 2008 #13

    compound driver 2

    compound driver 2

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    Hi
    mark out the arcs chain drill and use a hand file the same way a clock maker would do them.
    Its surprisingly easy to hit 5 thou with a decent file and some looking.

    Cheers Kevin
     
  14. Feb 6, 2008 #14

    compound driver 2

    compound driver 2

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    Sorry missed this bit off the last post.

    Id have to agree with Rick its much faster to use a pair of dividers to mark out a bolt circle
    than it is to write all these computer programs. Down with computers up with dividers LOL.

    Cheers kevin
     
  15. Feb 6, 2008 #15

    mklotz

    mklotz

    mklotz

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    Kevin,

    Using dividers is fine ASSUMING ONE CAN DO THE ASSOCIATED MATH. My experience with newbies and not a few so-called professional machinists is that most of them can not do even the simplest mathematical computations. For many, computing the chord length for a given number of holes might as well be calculus.

    I've had numerous Luddites make comments similar to yours. So many, in fact, that I took the time to write some thoughts on the subject - see below. If we abandon the use of the computer, should we also abandon CAD programs and return to the drafting board?

    Remember, one of the goals of this forum is to help folks who want to build engines. Anything that makes things easier for them is worth discussing here.

    ======================================================================================


    WHY WRITE A PROGRAM ?

    I've been asked on many occasions why I would bother to write a
    program that does little more than provide information readily available in
    certain reference texts. My answer is, "Why would one buy a scientific
    calculator if one already has a book with a table of trig functions in it?"

    GAGE is a good example. It allows you to find (sheet/wire) gage
    number given thickness/diameter or vice versa. This is information easily
    available in 'Machinery's Handbook' or a wealth of other references. Why
    write such a program?

    AVAILABILITY

    First, not everyone has the needed reference work to hand or
    necessarily knows instantly which book to pull from the shelf. Even if one
    has the book, finding the information can often be tedious. In the
    information age, it's generally easier to find data via the web than to search
    for it in one's (even perhaps extensive) home library. If the information is
    stored on your computer, you're always within a few keypresses of having it to
    hand. In fact, the ready availability and locatability of information is, in
    my mind, a more important asset of the computer than it's ability to do
    lightning fast computation.

    CONVENIENCE

    If you're a regular computer user, as many of us are today, you
    already know that typing some simple command, like 'GAGE' is far easier than
    searching out the book, scanning the index, finding the page, reading the
    table usage information, and then interpolating to find the desired
    information. Where appropriate, my programs tabulate output into a file which
    can be printed and carried to the shop for reference and that's a lot easier
    than dragging a bulky book to the shop and trying to hold it open with your
    anvil as a book weight.

    SPEED

    What computers are all about. Being able to get an answer rapidly
    makes you are more likely to 'do it right the first time' and to explore
    alternate solutions to the problem. Often a well written program will
    effortlessly provide 'more information than you asked for' and that can be a
    boon to creativity.

    ERROR MINIMIZATION AND LONG TERM MEMORY

    If the code is written correctly, a program 'remembers' FOREVER EXACTLY
    how to solve a given problem. The human mind is never capable of this long
    term precision. Beyond remembering the mechanization of solution, it can also
    remember all the likely errors to check for, catch typos, and just generally
    formalize the input to the point where most simplistic errors will be caught.

    ADAPTABILITY

    By utilizing an easily edited data file as input, the well-written
    program provides a means whereby the user can tailor the program, or add to its
    data base without the need to understand in detail the interior workings of the
    algorithm.
     
  16. Feb 6, 2008 #16

    compound driver 2

    compound driver 2

    compound driver 2

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    I put down a simple solution to dividing a bolt circle and you call me a Luddite! get stuffed! Even a complete bloody fool can step off a circle to form a bolt circle.

    Luddite! I use solidworks 05 and Autocad 14. Luddite! I have a degree in mechanical engineering but also have the ability to open a set of dividers.

    I was being lite hearted and WILL NOT BE INSULTED I did not deserve it.

    Why dont you go learn to use hand tools you may even find its more fun than a computer!
     
  17. Feb 6, 2008 #17

    AllThumbs

    AllThumbs

    AllThumbs

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    uhmmmm, yeah, I doubt anyone was trying to insult anyone. Remember, it's easy to mis-read the tone in any post on a message board. I always say, when in doubt, assume the best (not the worst). Especially on a message board.

    Eric
     
  18. Feb 6, 2008 #18

    gilessim

    gilessim

    gilessim

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    Kevin, I have great respect for your work and the way you work, but I feel that I must point out that Marv didn't call you a Luddite
    and IMHO there was no insult directed at you!, I got the impression that Marv was just trying to point out to the lesser experienced members , the validity of a computer, regarding certain engineering problems.

    Giles
     
  19. Feb 6, 2008 #19

    mklotz

    mklotz

    mklotz

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    Sorry, Kevin, if you inferred that I regarded you as a Luddite. I don't and should have been more careful in my wording. My apologies.

    Nevertheless, I stand behind what I wrote. There are always multiple ways to get something done. Each of us has a favorite method but that is not license to denigrate other ways to do the job. The skill set of our readers varies widely and it's our job to offer as many techniques as possible so they can select one that suits their abilities. For some that will be laying out by hand and filing. For others it will be using a rotary table on a mill with a worksheet generated by a program.

    What we don't need to see is an evaluation of the purity of the method used.

    Oh, and BTW, I do use hand tools regularly. In fact, I've built quite a few of them.

     
  20. Feb 6, 2008 #20

    rake60

    rake60

    rake60

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    Well I already said in my post that it wasn't safe. [​IMG]

    The bore of the flywheel was .125"
    I chucked up a short length of 1/8" drill rod in the mill vise that was a very close but
    movable fit to the bore. Then I improvised a mini strap wrench that could be securely
    tightened up on the OD of the flywheel. With the 1/8" corner hole already drilled, I lowered
    a 1/8" end mill into a hole and slowly rotated the part around on the drill rod until
    the end mill reached the next hole. The handle on my little strap wrench was about 6"
    long and gave me a the feeling I had control over it. Keep in mind the web thickness
    was only 1/16"

    It's certainly NOT a method I would recommend!

    Rick

     

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