Shop Safety rules

Discussion in 'General Engine Discussion' started by Tin Falcon, Jul 21, 2007.

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  1. Sep 26, 2013 #41

    Tinkerer58

    Tinkerer58

    Tinkerer58

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    Mobile phone is always on my person but how do I dial the numbers after all my fingers are chopped off on the machine. LOL

    Talking about someone keeping a check on you when working, about 3 years ago I was modifying my trailer and making ramps out of 'I' beams. I was working away in the back yard using the angle grinder on a nice summers day at about 38 Deg C (100F) and the wife came out and said what is that smell?? Then I turned around and the the lawn was well alight behind me, quickly got the hose and put out the fire. Good thing was she was there and I don't have a very good sense of smell so didn't notice (even though I was blessed with a big honker, that was a waste LOL).
    The other up side was I didn't have to mow the grass for half the back yard for at least 2 months. It just goes to show danger is everywhere and you need to be on your toes all the time and really consider everything that can go wrong. That is not being pesimistic it's being a realist, SAFETY is paramount for you and everyone around you, SO THINK BEFORE YOU DO ANYTHING, anything that can go wrong WILL, when you least expect it.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2013
  2. Sep 26, 2013 #42

    gus

    gus

    gus

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    Way back in the 90s,an Industrial Nurse came in and made a lot of noise that every thing was wrong on the production floor.The floor was very dirty,cobwebs in the corners, workers worked bare handed with no gloves,lathes had no guards over the chuck and tool posts.etc. Luckily the 100 ton China Power Press had a giant front guard down.
    My supervisor was a bit upset. Just last week a regular Labour Inspector just came in and gave us 99.9 full marks for good practice and now this Industrial Nurse popped from no where to berate us. Called Labour Inspector to ask about this Industrial Nurse.
    Advice was Safety Checks not her job.Ha ha ha. That was her last visit.
     
  3. Sep 26, 2013 #43

    wildun

    wildun

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    Just one more observation I would like to make before I leave is that if you look at manually operated lathe and mill operations and imagine them as new innovations in today's society and environment, - do you think that we would be allowed to introduce them? - not a chance!
    So, I think that we home machinists are the privileged few who are allowed to actually think for ourselves and make our own decisions regarding safety, so let's lie low and savour the moment! - just like rock climbers, people on mobility scooters, etc.
    I think it will soon become mandatory to wear a thumb guard and mouth guard when playing tiddleywinks.:D
    Quite a few years ago, some up and coming politician decided that all motorcyclists should have rollover cages fitted to their machines - yea, right!.:rolleyes:
    Will.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2013
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  4. Sep 26, 2013 #44

    Cogsy

    Cogsy

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    Here in Perth, the 2011 Roleystone bushfires were caused by an off-duty cop with an angle grinder, working on his trailer. The result - 71 houses completely destroyed and many damaged. He got off the charges on a technicality (WA Police Union provided the best lawyer money can buy). Turned out the paperwork for the 'total fire ban' wasn't filed correctly.

    The moral of the story, be very careful with hot work, and Tinkerer - you were very lucky that day...
     
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  5. Dec 13, 2014 #45

    HeadsfortheShed

    HeadsfortheShed

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    Hi all, first, just loved reading all these anecdotes. How true the words less pace more ace, are. However there is one important bit of kit which in my experience has caused more pain to me and others but not noted here. It is called an angle grinder here in good old Blightey. People in fabricating/welding shops will certainly be aware of the versatility of this popular hand tool. For ages I was plagued by inflamed extremely sore eyes usually encountered at two o'clock in the morning. This inevitably ended in a trip to the eye hospital to have a filament of steel removed from my eye ball. I couldn't understand what the cause was. I was using approved goggles and visors whenever I used the grinders so what was going on? Then one day the old light bulb light up as I realized it was the filaments from the grinder landing in my hair and on my sweat dampened face, which upon showering at home where washed into my eyes. A few hours of rem sleep and presto a deeply lodged almost invisible filament embedded in my eye. I never found a satisfactory answer to this problem without expensive fan assisted filtered head gear. Your thoughts...
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2014
  6. Dec 13, 2014 #46

    goldstar31

    goldstar31

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    I have several 'incidents' worthy of note.

    I was boat building- outside. It was November almost into Scotland. I had the standing wood planer out- and my brain was frozen. I put my left hand into the rotating barrel as I fed the wood in. Comment- I'll never eat mince again.

    Happily, I had presence of mind to drip blood all over the house, wrap the hand in a white dress shirt and get into the car and change gear- English car- with two fingers. Got into the A&E and was met by a consultant plastic surgeon who planed a bit more off my arm- this time.
    You've probably heard of plastic surgery and maybe the work that the late Sir Archiw McIndoe did for those poor aircrew who were burned in their Lancaster bombers. Well, I was the surgeons last case before he left for East Grinstead where all this had happened. Lucky me- I have a left hand which sort of works.
    My next effort was that I was working on an ancient Morris Minor with gas bottles. It haf been earlier botched and botched. 'Auntie Mary' had been around a bit. I was wearing tinted goggles in bright sunshine and failed to notice that the door sill was alight. Someone had put a piece of wood in to stiffen the sill. Need I say more?

    The next was me with a Surface grinder. I was doing a lathe saddle which was worn badly. I had some steel wool where the sparks were going- they ignited the steel wool.Interesting!

    There was another time. I'd cast some alloy from old bits of car gear boxes. I was at night schools- making a pulley out of them.
    I'd cleaned up a bit of rusty metal earlier and the turnings lay in the lathe tray. The supervisor passed,
    looked into the lathe tray and quipped 'Norman, you'd be a fine man in a political organisation' I made a ferrite bomb!

    So back to bombs? Well, we had a bombing raid. I was about 10. Things were getting a bit rough outside our Anderson air raid shelter and my father hoisted me out into a scene where machine gun bullets were bouncing about in the dog fight between the Heinkel and our nightfighter. The Heinkel dropped its bombs- presumably to lighten its load etc and the incendiaries were lighting up the area. There were 7 big bangs and Dad and I went out to help put out the fires with our garden spades. It was quite a night. Went to school next morning and when school ended we went off to see the unexploded bomb. German rubbish! So there was the thing sticking its fin out in a field with a few stakes around it to keep out the cows. So we kids were happy and off home to whatever tea there was in the war. And then the dud bomb exploded as we left the field!

    Cheers

    Norman
     

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