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nautilus29

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I'm building a shop\ mother-in-law suit right now. I'm excited to have my first real shop, but I'm realistically a year away from having the thing finished enough to put a shop in it.

So now I have a year to try to figure out what I want to put in the thing. I have a taig lathe that I've been slowly converting into a cnc, and then I have a southbend 9a that's at my dad's place for the meantime, so it looked like I need a mill.

I for sure want some kind of cnc, but I can't decide if I want to go with a bigger cnc and have that be my mill, or go with a tabletop cnc and buy a used bridgeport to have more options.

I've been looking at the precision matthews options and I like what I see there, especially their high precision models. But then I saw someone selling a used tormach 1100 in my area and I started daydreaming about having a machine like that at my place haha.

So many options, this is going to take me the whole year to decide. If you guys have any suggestions feel free to mention them!
 

ShopShoe

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I can't remember if you ever said where you are? Sometimes that is helpful to know.

Do you plan to stay with small projects or have a goal of making bigger things or taking new challenges?

Do you enjoy making tools, modifying machines, building machines, or are you wanting to get up to speed with making models or other things?

From what you said, I think that getting a small cnc mill running would be a good thing to try to do while your building is being built: Your call as to whether you get a turnkey system or put someting together from components.

You can probably begin acquiring measuring tools and practice precision.

Be sure to plan for large in your new place, even if you don't go that way: Electrical service that can have circuits added, lots of light, whatever climate control you need, etc.

Do you think you might want to experiment with 3-D printing: The cost is getting low and you could use that process to play with the 3-D design software you might use to plan for projects that would be cnc machined.

In your metal shop, do you think you might want a surface grinder at some point?

Some of us do abrasive blasting (sand, glass beads, etc.) as part of what we do. Would you want a blast cabinet? You'll need more compressed air for that. You probably want compressed air anyway.

For further consideration (and don't be offended if you know of these already) I can suggest two YouTube sources who cover lots of different things and undertake little bits of work in a wide range of areas:

Oxtoolco (Tom Lipton) Be sure to watch his shop tour.

This Old Tony

-----

--ShopShoe
 

nautilus29

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Thank you for the thoughtful reply!

I'm from northwest Ohio. Because of the auto industry there is a lot of used equipment around here at least if you are looking for bigger stuff.

I'm a machinist by trade, so I have most of the important inspection equipment. This is one of the reasons I got into model engines to begin with. I have the opportunity to make large parts\ run large machines at work, so it's fun to take that home, but on a different scale haha. It would also be nice to have the option to do larger work which is why I've been debating the small cnc\ used bridgeport route.

My shop is roughly 16 x 27, since there is an apartment up above it it will be fully climate controlled. I plan on putting a large air compressor in the utility room so I don't have to hear it running in the shop. I'd love to have a surface grinder but I'd probably get a small table top one if I decide to grab one. Although I can find used ones for pretty cheap they take too much shop space for how much I'd use the extra size. (plus I have some at work if I need to use one). I'll probably get s sand blaster\ parts washer from harbor freight. I'll probably keep the blaster in the garage though so I don't get sand all over my equipment.

I'm building the building myself so I don't have much time to actually tinker with anything at this time. It's one of the reasons I'm trying to decide what I want for equipment right now, since I don't have time to tinker with anything at the moment.
 

Mike Henry

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I've been looking at the precision matthews options and I like what I see there, especially their high precision models. But then I saw someone selling a used tormach 1100 in my area and I started daydreaming about having a machine like that at my place haha.
I've had a Tormach PCNC 1100 since 2006 for mostly hobby and some light job shop use and it has held up well over the years and is pretty inexpensive to maintain so far as spare parts go. If you go looking for a used one be aware that the 1100 has been released in various models over the years - the 1100 Series I, II,, and III, and the current 1100 M and 1100 MX. The Series I can be upgraded to the II or III, but not the M or MX. My basic 1100 Series I with stand and no enclosure or accessories was around $9k when I bought it. The basic 1100 MX is better equipped but is around twice the price, so arm your self with facts regarding what options were available for any used models that you look at to avoid getting snookered or missing out on a great deal.
 

nautilus29

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Thanks for that advice. I assumed the price was always this high for the 1100.
 

Chiptosser

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Nautilus,
Are you familiar with HGR industrial?, ouside of Cleveland.
You never know what they have from day to day. They have smaller equipment from time to time.
 

nautilus29

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Nautilus,
Are you familiar with HGR industrial?, ouside of Cleveland.
You never know what they have from day to day. They have smaller equipment from time to time.
I've been watching their website, they have some good stuff on there. I do wish they sold their chucks and collets for a little cheaper though. Those prices always seem a little steep to me.
 

bdrmachine

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My vote is a used Haas TM1P. You can run it off single-phase power if need be. I bought one used a few years back as mainly a hobby. I found a niche in the local market and now it is quite the money maker. It runs lights out a lot of times. I do miss my old Bridgeport for the versatility. Even with cnc there are times a mill with a tilting head can't be beaten.
 

mfrick

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Hello
I aggree with tihe the Haas TM1. I purchased a used machine several years ago, it is in great condition and very solid. I love its table size and I have had zero problems with it. I has a very solid spindle and it has a 10 tool turrett 40 mm taper. I looked at the Tormach and the price of a new machine was more than I paid for the Haas, I also talked to several people who have the Tormach and they had spindle bearing troubles so that changed my mind very happy with my choice.

Mike
 

nautilus29

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We have a haas at work, so I'm pretty comfortable with them too. I've seen some around me for 12k.
 

mfrick

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Well 12k is what I paid for my Haas TM1 it also came with kurt vise and two dozen tool holders and collets so very well outfited. One of the best features is it will run on standard 220 single phase power. The only Item that I had to add was a larger air compressor to run the tool changer, other than that a good CAD/CAM program, it dose have qucik code that works great for simple projects. When building shop make sure you put in a large doog to move machines in and out. also have a tall enjough ceiling. Good luck on your project.
Mike
 

swood1

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I have been looking at the Fanuc Robodrill or the Haas Minimill. Would love a Haas TM1 but don't think I have enough room :( Out of interest do all VMC require compressed air for the toolchangers?

Regards

Steven
 

nautilus29

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I have been looking at the Fanuc Robodrill or the Haas Minimill. Would love a Haas TM1 but don't think I have enough room :( Out of interest do all VMC require compressed air for the toolchangers?

Regards

Steven
Every machine I have run has needed it, so more than likely you'll need it for the machine you get.
 

nautilus29

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I'm having builders remorse on the size of me shop haha.
 

nautilus29

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I'm bored, and since I'm not close to a pc I decided to draw up a rough shop layout just to get a visualization of how much space I have. Equipment is subject to change, but what do you guys think? Each square is a half a foot, the wide door that leads into the garage is only there to get equipment in the shop so although I don't want to put anything that's bolted down there it is usable space. As of now I just made it storage for my wood working tools.
 

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swood1

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Can the Bridgeport go against a wall, in the corner? I would put your workbench against a wall.
 

Chiptosser

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You want to be able to get around the bridgeport mill table. Its not like having a mini mill.
Is the foot print of the BO at full travel in X positive and negitive ?
 

nautilus29

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Bridgeport is drawn up as if the x travel is maxed out in both directions. 44" past the bed. The y isn't maxed out it's more centered, but it doesn't have near as much travel so it would only be able to change 6 inches either way. Bridgeport base is 18 inches from the wall which gives enough space for the head to be pushed back as far as possible.
You want to be able to get around the bridgeport mill table. Its not like having a mini mill.
Is the foot print of the BO at full travel in X positive and negitive ?

The bridgeport could move closer to one wall or the other yes. By roughly 2 feet, but the table moves far in the x so It I can't go too extreme with it. I originally drew it up to be as close.to the one wall as possible but ended up going this route so I could fit the cabinets and stock storage behind it. I put the workbench centered on the lathe and mill, but I'm open to different ideas!
Can the Bridgeport go against a wall, in the corner? I would put your workbench against a wall.

The large door is only there to get machinery into the shop so that space could probably be utilized a little better.
 

ShopShoe

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I also wonder if the clearances around your Bridgeport are narrow. I don't know what you plan for the shelves and cabinets, but are they in an inconvenient location if you constantly have to get things from them or put things in them?

I cringe a bit seeing your sander and grinder where they can throw dust on your mill. I have that problem somewhat and it is a big PITA to have to keep covering things and cleaning as part of the workflow.

--ShopShoe
 

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