Scrooge style Milling machine

Discussion in 'Machine Modifications' started by Shipdisturber, Jun 4, 2018.

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  1. Jun 4, 2018 #1

    Shipdisturber

    Shipdisturber

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    Being a bit of a tightwad I couldn't see spending a whack of money on a proper milling machine (budget and space a concern too). I took a small Canadian Tire drill press and a milling vise from Bang Good to make my dream machine.
    I installed aluminum spacer blocks and plate to raise the milling slide to get close enough to the drill chuck to use. The depth adjuster I adjust to the depth I want then tighten both jam nuts to set the depth. What used to be a guide screw is now a jam bolt to lock and help steady the rotating parts.
    One picture shows my first cut which is not good but with practice I thing I can make this work.
     

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  2. Jun 4, 2018 #2

    DJP

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    You are now on the slippery slope to getting a big mill. I tried your approach but fine measurements of cutter position were not possible and the X-Y table was not tight enough for good control. Watch out for climb milling which can surprise you and tear a work piece out of a small vise.

    It may take years but eventually you'll have a big mill in your shop. When you are not looking one will show up and be a bargain so until then create a discretionary fund for machinery and enjoy your drill press creation.
     
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  3. Jun 4, 2018 #3

    Shipdisturber

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    I agree DJP, to tell you the truth I'm always on the lookout for a deal. Yes the Chinese tables have their quirks and with those they have to be adjusted to be snug. I'm just getting into the milling end of things so much learning to be done yet.
     
  4. Jun 4, 2018 #4

    Cogsy

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    But...be prepared for LOTS of warning posts about the dangers of using milling cutters in drill chucks (they don't grip hard enough) and chucks without a drawbar (the whole chuck can get pulled out of the spindle). It can be dangerous.
     
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  5. Jun 4, 2018 #5

    Shipdisturber

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    Thanks for your input Cogsy. The chuck is permanent not a taper fit like I said everything is cheap. The head speed isn't very fast and the bits I am using max out at 3/8 inch the rest are much smaller. It is about as Mickey Duck as it gets but will do in a pinch. Yes I want something better and when I find a deal or have enough spare cash laying around I will upgrade. One problem I have is space I live in a townhouse so my hobby shop is in a '6 by '16 shed so my milling machine will have to be hobby size.
     
  6. Jun 4, 2018 #6

    velocette

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    Hi Shipdisturber
    To add to the warning by Cogsy One way to LESSEN the chances of a cutter pulling out of the chuck is to use the chuck key with a lifting of the long leg on the key and repeat on four holes YES once round plus one this will settle the scroll more evenly.
    Do NOT add an extension to the key and attempt to winch it up on one hole only as you will succeed in damaging the chuck and or yourself when things go wrong.
    An old mentor of my in my now distant youth gave the instructions when tightening a three jaw chuck was tighten it up using all FOUR holes.
    Trouble with this is to get the buggers loosened again.
    Be careful out there and do not attempt heavy cuts and feed rates and you will probably survive with this setup.
    The depth stop on the left can be used to set the depth of cut Thread Pitch divided by six flats on the nut as rough measurement.
    Eric
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2018
  7. Jun 4, 2018 #7

    Shipdisturber

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    Thanks Velocette I use that method when I get a very slippery drill bit. Yes they are a pain to undo but they grip really well. My cuts are never very deep whether on this or on the lathe. I find a deep cut messes up my metal and cutting bits more.
     
  8. Jun 4, 2018 #8

    MRA

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    I'm half-way between where you are now and a real milling machine - I wrote it up here, maybe you'll find something useful.

    https://www.homemodelenginemachinis...r-drill-for-vertical-milling-new-chuck.25047/

    Like you I'm very tight for space - also, I have little spare money for this. I can get on a Bridgeport at work for the time being, so that takes a little pressure off moving house to accommodate some 'real' machines :)

    I just added a DRO today - two cheap digital verniers and some glued-on neodymium magnets to hold them. It seems to work surprisingly well - I'll add a photo to my thread when I get around to it.

    cheers
    Mark
     
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  9. Jun 5, 2018 #9

    wolframore

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    Kudos to you guys for being active and trying... Just be gentle and careful. We've all had close calls and drill press mills can be dicey at best. I'm also running out of room but know I need a dedicated mill. I have a 3 in 1 and keep running out of travel to do make anything useful. Having said that it's helped a number of time even with the limited capability. I think we would all love a Bridgeport if space was unlimited. I even had a chance to get a grizzly bench-top... space is at a premium even with a 2 car garage. It's great that you are creating!
     
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  10. Jun 5, 2018 #10

    MRA

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    Whenever I go camping for a week or so, I come back and think 'why do I need all this space' around the house. So I should move into a 6x4 shed for a bit, so my 12x8 starts to feel like luxury... :)
     
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  11. Jun 6, 2018 #11

    Mr68gts

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    Most of your drill presses are designed to have forces applied in a specific direction. Upward. Part of the reason for the tearing out of the parts is the end mill digging in when the bearings in the head assembly can not control the side loading experienced with milling. I've used a drill chuck in my Unimat lathe/mill for years with end mills and no problems. Just not the most accurate way to do things. If you require any kind of accuracy, a mill will be your best bet. And better yet is a milling machine with collets to secure the end mills. They control the run out the best.
    If you refuse to listen to reason....lol (just kidding of course) there are x/y tables that have graduations on the dials for a little bit more money than the cheapest one without.
    Paul
     
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  12. Jun 6, 2018 #12

    master53yoda

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    Last edited: Jun 6, 2018
  13. Jun 6, 2018 #13

    MRA

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    That's a lovely job, Yoda. I like your fine quill feed. I tend to lock mine off with the clamp to reduce chatter, and bring the job up to the cutter since I have a 3 axis table with a knee which will come up like a big machine. I used the little treadmill motor (left over from its large companion which is going on my lathe) to drive the x-feed on my mill setup. Lately I bought another ER25 chuck on a plain 25mm mandrel, and I have a bevel crown wheel and pinion from a hand drill which I hope to turn into a horizontal mill attachment :) Got to make something to hold the bearings and overarm - might cast it but I only melt about a pint at a time here.
     
  14. Jun 6, 2018 #14

    master53yoda

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    I do a lot of casting, i can cast up to about 65 lbs aluminum with my tilting furnace, I provide aluminum to the hobby market through my e-bay store in 6,14,28, and 43 lb boxes as well up to 250lb orders for small foundry operations. The tilting furnace is designed to melt automotive cylinder heads.

    Art b
     
  15. Jun 6, 2018 #15

    bazmak

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    Been there and done that and its fun to start with.All comments so far are relevant and should be adhered to
    I too was tight for space and too did not have room for a big mill.So got a small chinese mill an Sx2 l
    The same size as a small bench drill and i found that using it as an accurate drill was so superior i sold the drill
    and bought lots of extras.The bonus is the milling.I have made a lot of models of decent size and it has been a blessing
    and done everything i asked of it.I would suggest you go down this pathe.Play about with your drill,find out all the inadequacies
    and swap it for a small sieg mill or similar.You will amazesd at what yhey can do.I was
     
  16. Jun 7, 2018 #16

    Shipdisturber

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    I had a look at your drill press conversion Master, an excellent job I must say and a ton of work too. So because I am limited with my resources and don't like to spend a huge amount of time converting my cheap tooling. So looking at what Bazmak is saying about the Chinese mills I'm thinking about saving my nickles and dimes until I can afford one. Bazmak you say the Chinese milling machines make great little drill presses too, maybe I can scrap my junk drill.
     
  17. Jun 7, 2018 #17

    Shipdisturber

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    I had a look at the reviews for the Power Fist milling machine and they don't look too good, time for a different plan.
     
  18. Jun 8, 2018 #18

    bazmak

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    I bought the sieg mill and it does everything i want with excerlence. And as well as top class bench drill it acts as
    a precision vertical borer. I sold my bench drill as soon as i got the mill,bought a decent vise etc and have never looked back
    have a look at my thread bazmak diary of a sieg sx2 benchmill
     
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  19. Jun 8, 2018 #19

    minh-thanh

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    Useful information ... because I was also planning to convert the drilling machine into a milling machine.
     
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  20. Jun 8, 2018 #20

    XD351

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    One thing you need to be careful of is how the head mounts to the column , my drill press only has a grub screw to locate the head on the column so any horizontal forces can cause it to wander around the column .
     
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