Putting some grip (stippling) on an aluminium drive pulley.

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Jules

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Thank god some of you guys weren't at Kitty Hawk in 1903. I wouldn't have a job if you were.
Great comment, I nearly made reference to the very same moment.
That aircraft had no guards over the drive chains and very little regard for crew safety........👍
 

coulsea

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one of the reasons for the success of the human race is our huge variation which gives a range of people able to either take advantage of or survive most situations. the range of attitudes towards covid is a perfect example, people will never agree so it is up to our leaders to come up with rules that hopefully benefit society in general (will this happen to youtube on day). A lot of justifications are only half of the story, like what was wrong with a 1903 plane, obviously it was too dangerous to be of any practical use but someone had to try it and learn from it.
I read a study once about how discussions like this degrade to personal attacks until someone is said to be like Hitler and then the moderators end it.
It's been an interesting example of human nature. I had better go and make something useless in my workshop now.
 

Cogsy

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I read a study once about how discussions like this degrade to personal attacks until someone is said to be like Hitler and then the moderators end it.
Absolutely the 'Hitler point' is a hard limit! Although I'm hoping we're respectful enough that it won't come to that...
 

STEVEJ

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Jim. This has been the most amusing thing on here for as long as I have been a member. I know a lot of people have gone over the top with their comments. I really hope that you are not offended.

Kind regards. Steve. X
 

minh-thanh

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Hi Cogsy , My friend :)
If the tool slips off but stays secure in the multigrips which he is holding, there's no way for the blade to get to his fingers, and if it slips off it is no longer driven so won't have enough momentum to cause much of an injury. If the blade pivots in the multigrips, as we both suspect is possible, the blade could still be driven and may come in to contact with his finger. However, it will also come into contact with the side of the multigrips and this will a) stop it going deeper into his finger and b) stop the blade quickly as he lets go of the whole thing. There'd possibly be an injury but it's likely to be slight. Honestly, I end up with a 'gash' that needs patching at least every couple of weeks, either from bumping a milling cutter, sliding my finger along something I shouldn't or just bashing into something hard. If I don't have to stop working for more than a few minutes then I don't consider it a bad enough injury to worry about.
Hello my friend !
I don't know if you read my previous comment, !?
For someone who has tried that method, I understand the sensation of a saw blade sharpening grinding into my skin
One problem is : If a person is completely new (or very inexperienced, or he doesn't mind speed ... ...), he just skimmed the video and has a lathe, and he do the same but at higher speeds (500, 1000 rpm ..) and what happens when he makes a mistake ??
The point here is: why are there so many better, safer methods ... that everyone suggested were overlooked ??

And why choose between if : mildly injured and uninjured ??
.........


PS : Hi All !
I am not a safety expert or professional mechanic ... I used to do even more stupid things, and went to the doctor three times as a result of those stupid things
 
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terryd

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Thank god some of you guys weren't at Kitty Hawk in 1903. I wouldn't have a job if you were.
Yes, point taken, but many died before Kittyhawk - Wright Bros weren't working in a vacuum but on the shoulders of their predecessors - and many have died since. Hope it wasn't one of your components or systems that was at fault in any of those situations unlike the Boeing cobbled up software - "it'll be ok".

Up to Chernobyl comparisons now.....can't wait to see what's next.
Hi Jim,

you just don't get it do you, "there are non so blind as those that will not see", or so my old dad used to say bless him.

TerryD
 
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terryd

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Whatever happened to 'Common sense' ?
Unfortunately it is not very common these days.

Dave
The Emerald Isle
Hi Dave,

Up to Victorian times 'common sense' said that cholera and the plague etc were spread by bad smells so people carried pomanders or small posies (hence the street flower girls in London - think Eliza Doolittle) for protection.

'Common sense' said that metal boats wouldn't float until someone realised that Archimedes had demonstrated the phenomenon of displacement.

Common sense may be common but it often isn't sense.

TerryD
 
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JimDobson

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Jim. This has been the most amusing thing on here for as long as I have been a member. I know a lot of people have gone over the top with their comments. I really hope that you are not offended.

Kind regards. Steve. X

G'day Steve, offended no, amused greatly. Hugely interested to see just how far a group of people (who by their responses and human nature, have turned into a short term thread gang) will struggle to bolster each of their very public and very conspicuously bizarre stances.
 

SteveM

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I'm astonished and saddened at the ludicrous criticism Jim's video has generated. It was an interesting take on something he wanted to achieve, short and sweet and impossible to see how any sort of serious injury could have occurred. I spent 30 years in the Fire Service and another decade in fire safety and H&S so I'm aware that people often do stupid things and get hurt. But Jim was not going to seriously hurt himself or anyone else. And come on - nobody in their right mind would see it and think it safe to upscale it to the risk of dismemberment.

I sometimes wonder how the H&S devotees of this world ever find anything interesting to watch. In their world every video would be twice as long to include the necessary disclaimers and advisories (now this is relatively safe, but if you used a bigger sharper tool or a spinny thing spinning really fast - then you risk another Chernobyl!!!). And half the the videos from Abom or ToT or Robin or Cogsy or Stefan or AVE or the like would be X-rated. In the perfect H&S world videos about diving in the ocean or rugby or machining would be banned, because it it is simply not possible to do any of these things without some element of risk. Watching cricket would be a nightmare seeing 'DON'T TRY THIS AT HOME' flashed on the screen whenever someone whacks a six.

I hate this expression and have never used it in print before but really - some of you need to get a life.

Thanks for posting Jim. I like to see your work and how you do it.
 

KellisRJ

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Yes, point taken, but many died before Kittyhawk - Wright Bros weren't working in a vacuum but on the shoulders of their predecessors - and many have died since. Hope it wasn't one of your components or systems that was at fault in any of those situations unlike the Boeing cobbled up software - "it'll be ok".
I was a pilot & logistician in the US Army and once a maintenance tech. Long story . . . Whenever I heard someone say "it'll be ok" I knew with 100% surety they weren't planning on being there when the fecal matter started spraying. Once turned down an aircraft when the mechanic, who had probably been doing it a long time, retorqued a bolt in the rotor head assembly without writing it up or getting a tech inspector to sign it off. Didn't argue with him. But the Main. officer was royally hacked off that I spoiled his time-to-maintenance flow demanding another aircraft. Until I returned. Then he sheepishly showed me a steel shaft 2/3 gone eaten away by an aluminum crank arm. A ticking time bomb if ever I saw one. Yea "It'll be OK."

Ron
 

jack620

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Hope it wasn't one of your components or systems that was at fault in any of those situations unlike the Boeing cobbled up software - "it'll be ok".
I fly them, I don't build them. I take risks in my workshop I would never dream of taking in a cockpit with 500 passengers behind me.

I still don't understand why some posters here are trying to equate one man in his home workshop to nuclear and aviation disasters.
 

Mike Ginn

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SteveM is spot on. We modellers are use to working with rotating machines. Myford sell a chuck guard which I purchased. Its just not usable and is in the junk box. The first thing I did with my mill was to remove the guards along with most modellers. You have got to use common sense and be aware, so keep your fingers away from cutters and chucks. I don’t see anything wrong with Jim’s approach to stippling and I really don’t see the danger, if we accept that we all use unguarded slit saws. Remember that the mass associated with slit saws is very small. If you apply risk assessment and so-called H&S to our workshops then you might as well shut up shop. H&S is so often applied by folk with little workshop experience!
 

goldstar31

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As I am very old and also a high Covid 19 risk in lockdown.
Her husband, my son in law is a senior heart consultant working in surgery in a full Covid-19 ward.
My daughter is a consultant dentist working in people's mouths.

Yes, may I utter 'Get a Life'
 

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