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Putting some grip (stippling) on an aluminium drive pulley.

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JimDobson

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Putting some grip (stippling) on an aluminium drive pulley.

I've always wanted to work out a way to put some extra grip on a home made drive pulley to prevent or cut down on belt slippage. It would be nice to have the tooling that Wilesco use on their grooved pulleys. I had a Dremel saw accessory that the outer plastic shell broke and I thought what can I do with the saw blade. Rudimentary, but it worked well. I should be able to work out now a way to mount it so it doesn't need to be held, though its not as dangerous as that looks and being hand held allowed me to skew the saw blade at the various angles needed easily.

 

RM-MN

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I think you will find that along with the extra grip you get from that you will also find excessive belt wear. The more common way to transmit more power is to use a wider belt and pulleys.
 

goldstar31

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I think the Health and Safety people might have might the same view as myself.
Initially, ther is ubsupported machining and secondly, the idea is gimcrack-- to say the least.

I'd welcome the thoughts of the qualified- which I am not:)
 

BaronJ

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Hi Guys,

Whilst I understand what Jim was trying to do, I wouldn't have posted that video as a method of achieving the machining.

In my opinion it was a poorly thought out video ! Displaying a dangerous procedure. Certainly a practice not to be recommended.
 

josodl1953

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Pulleys for drive belts should have a vee-shaped groove, making the belt wedge into the groove and thus create friction to transfer power from one pulley to another. The reason Messrs. Wilesco knurled their grooves on the steam engine pulleys was that they did not use ordinary belts ( rubber) but belts made of a long thin spiral spring. The idea behind this was that this type of drive was not critical on center distance ot the shafts. The attachments that could be used, for instance a circular saw or grinding equipment were just for show, not to do the actual job. So, the power transmitted was negligible and made the spiral spring belt ideal for the job. After all, we are talking about toys. I had a few of these attachments on my Wilesco steam engine long time ago back in the sixties when I was a child....

Jos
 

IanN

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Returning to the original post:

What are you trying to do with the pulley system, and why are you using the belt/pulley you show?

If you want to transmit power you should use a belt/pulley designed for the job rather than taking a belt design/form intended to transmit little power and “over-rate” it (as others have already said)

If you must use the belt you show, a standard way of increasing the power capacity is to run two (or more) belts in parallel pulleys

Also, as already said by others, for power transmission a vee profile groove or a flat pulley with a crown is used, never a radiused profile groove

Finally - belt transmission has been in use for (literally) centuries, and in that time has been perfected through experiment and the development of engineering theory. Common sense suggests that if texturing the pulley was a good method of increasing the power capacity the all pulleys would be made that way .....

All the best,
Ian
 

terryd

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Returning to the original post:

What are you trying to do with the pulley system, and why are you using the belt/pulley you show?

If you want to transmit power you should use a belt/pulley designed for the job rather than taking a belt design/form intended to transmit little power and “over-rate” it (as others have already said)

If you must use the belt you show, a standard way of increasing the power capacity is to run two (or more) belts in parallel pulleys

Also, as already said by others, for power transmission a vee profile groove or a flat pulley with a crown is used, never a radiused profile groove

Finally - belt transmission has been in use for (literally) centuries, and in that time has been perfected through experiment and the development of engineering theory. Common sense suggests that if texturing the pulley was a good method of increasing the power capacity the all pulleys would be made that way .....

All the best,
Ian
Hi Ian,
we used to apply a bit of powdered rosin - the stuff violinists use on their bows - if a Vee or similar belt showed signs of slipping, but that was not often neccessary. If the pulley and belt are matched properly, then tensioned correctly slippage should not be a problem. We used lightweight round section plastic belting on small machines such as sensitive drilling machine with never any slippage problems, but they had elasticity could be stretched onto the pulleys for tension (not excessive of course, not enough to cause bearing wear) and didn't stretch,

Terry
 

RM-MN

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Contrary to what one would expect, a little oil on a v-belt that was beginning to slip due to age and wear would cause it to grip better. It would get the farmer by during the last of the harvest when time was critical but that belt better be replaced before the next harvest.
 

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