Photographs taken while building several Aderyn Steam Motors.

Discussion in 'Finished Projects' started by Tony Bird, Mar 15, 2011.

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  1. Mar 15, 2011 #1

    Tony Bird

    Tony Bird

    Tony Bird

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    Hi,
    I hope the group will be interested in the following photographs takena a few years while making several Aderyn Steam Motors. I'm not sure how many photographs there are, not too many I hope. I will post about five photographs at a time. Any questions please ask.
    Drawings made after constructing the ASM.
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    Machining three Port Blocks.
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    Machining edge of Port Block.
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    Partly drilled Port Block.
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    Drilling holes for Bearing Plates.
    Cutting Screws to length.
    [​IMG]
    Regards Tony.
     
  2. Mar 15, 2011 #2

    Tony Bird

    Tony Bird

    Tony Bird

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    Hi Again,
    A few more photographs.
    Missed this next one on previous post.
    Drilling holes in Port Block.
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    Drilling Axle Bearing holes.
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    Reaming Axle Bearing holes.
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    Machining ends of Axle Bearing plates.
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    16 Cylinders on Shellac Chuck.
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    Machining 16 Cylinders.
    [​IMG]
    I will try and do some more tomorrow.
    Regards Tony.
     
  3. Mar 15, 2011 #3

    Philjoe5

    Philjoe5

    Philjoe5

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    Tony,
    An interesting engine - you have my attention.

    The term "Shellac Chuck" is unfamiliar to me. Is it what it appears to be - 16 blank cylinders stuck to a faceplate with shellac?

    Cheers,
    Phil
     
  4. Mar 15, 2011 #4

    4156df

    4156df

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    Tony,
    The more pictures, the better. I'd sure like to hear more about how a "shellac chuck" works. It looks useful.
    Dennis
     
  5. Mar 15, 2011 #5

    steamer

    steamer

    steamer

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    ahh clock making techniques on steroids....I love it.

    Shellac chucks and wax chucks are very common in clock and watchmaking.

    Superglues works well if you groove the face plate first.

    Comes off with a little bit of heat.

    Dave
     
  6. Mar 16, 2011 #6

    Tony Bird

    Tony Bird

    Tony Bird

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    Hello Again,
    Quite right Dave. Used for centuries by the Horological trade. Shellac Chucks or as they are more commonly known Wax Chucks though shellac isn't a wax it being a resinous yellowish secretion of the Lac beetle. It is mostly used in varnishes, polishes and also as 'stopping' to fill holes in wood before painting or polishing. Good quality shellac melts at 84C and can be dissolved by ethanol or similar. Other than the flat disc chuck which is the commonest of the Shellac Chucks there are several others some of which there will be in later photographs. Shellac Chucks are usually made of brass which doesn't have a tendency to rust after heating. The large ones that will be seen in the photographs are mild steel which are cleaned off when they get too much mess on them. These chucks have grooves turned in them as a key for the shellac. In use the chucks are heated out of the lathe until the shellac can be melted onto them, the work piece is placed on the shellac and also heated until it sinks into the shellac, it is then pressed into the shellac some of which will come out from under the work piece. Pushing down on the work piece leaves a thickness of about 0.20mm below it which can be added to any measurement clocked off the face of the chuck. To be more accurate part of the work piece can protrude over the edge of the chuck to be directly measured. When cold the chuck can be returned to the lathe for turning. Sharp tools, fairly light cuts and no great heat to be generated is the order of the day. Shellac isn't effected by any cutting oil that I have tried. To remove the work piece from the chuck it can just be put in boiling water or heated again in either case the residual shellac can be removed by placing in alcohol. When contaminated enough the alcohol can be used as French Polish. Advantages of these chucks? They don't mark the work piece and will hold almost any shape as long as it has an adequate flat surface. Advantages over Super glue? They probably both have the same strength but shellac is easily repositioned and removed after turning. Mostly if the work piece comes off the chuck while turning it isn't damaged. I use these Shellac chucks a lot and have many of them in different sizes and types.
    Note it is important that there is no dust or debris in the shelac to lift the work piece off it. The chucks are cleaned in alcohol occasionally and if too bad skimmed in the lathe.

    Tutorial over, return to story.

    Tony.
     
  7. Mar 16, 2011 #7

    Tony Bird

    Tony Bird

    Tony Bird

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    To continue;
    Finished facing.
    [​IMG]
    Four cylinders taped together for turning their ends.
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    [​IMG]
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    Drilling cylinder bore.
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    Using depth gauge during boring of the cylinder.
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    Tools used in creating cylinder bore.
    [​IMG]
    Regards Tony.
     
  8. Mar 16, 2011 #8

    Tony Bird

    Tony Bird

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    Some more photographs.
    Making out tools.
    [​IMG]
    Centreing Cylinder on Shellac chuck.
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    Turning Port Face.
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    Finished Port Face.
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    Finished Cylinders.
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    Lapping Cylinders.
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    Threading piston Rod in Shellac Chuck.
    [​IMG]
    That's it for today. Will try and do more before we go away tomorrow.
    Regards Tony.
     
  9. Mar 16, 2011 #9

    4156df

    4156df

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    Tony,
    Thanks for the tutorial. I'm going to give shellac chucks a try. Also, thanks for posting the photos. I'm learning a lot seeing your techniques. It's particularly interesting to see so much "milling" done on a lathe. Keep the photos coming, please.
    Dennis

    P.S. Also looking forward to seeing the engine!
     
  10. Mar 17, 2011 #10

    Tony Bird

    Tony Bird

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    Hi Dennis,
    I do have a milling machine I made from part machined castings 30 years ago but if it is possible I use the lathe as for a lot of jobs I find it faster.
    Back to the photographs.
    Shellac chuck holding Piston Rod.
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    Sawing Piston.
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    Checking ID of '0' ring while in cylinder.
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    Turning piston on its rod using a Shellac Chuck.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    More to come.
    Regards Tony.
     
  11. Mar 17, 2011 #11

    Tony Bird

    Tony Bird

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    Progress so far.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Turning Big End off set.
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    Marking position of Big End on Piston Rod.
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    Big End Fitted.
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    Testing.
    [​IMG]

    Well thats it for a bit. We are off to visit our daughter in Central London for a few days.
    Regards Tony.
     
  12. Mar 17, 2011 #12

    Philjoe5

    Philjoe5

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    Tony,
    Your generous use of photos is much appreciated. I know how inconvenient it can be to stop working and grab a photo. Thanks for the progress report. Your work looks great.

    Cheers,
    Phil
     
  13. Mar 21, 2011 #13

    Tony Bird

    Tony Bird

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    Hello again, to continue.
    Turning slot in reversing disc.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Reverser Spring.
    [​IMG]
    Regards Tony.
     
  14. Mar 21, 2011 #14

    Tony Bird

    Tony Bird

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    And again,
    Turning Crank Discs.
    [​IMG]
    Reaming Crank Discs.
    [​IMG]
    Sawing Crank Disc.
    [​IMG]
    Facing Crank Discs.
    [​IMG]
    More tomorrow.
    Regards Tony.
     
  15. Mar 21, 2011 #15

    steamer

    steamer

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    Shellac chucks and Gravers.....OK so what do you do for a day job Tony? ;D

    Dave
     
  16. Mar 21, 2011 #16

    Tamosan

    Tamosan

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    Very different and interesting technique, I am watching with a big interest,great job!! :bow:
     
  17. Mar 21, 2011 #17

    4156df

    4156df

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    Tony,
    I'm still following along and learning something with each post. Keep 'em coming, please.
    Dennis
     
  18. Mar 22, 2011 #18

    Tony Bird

    Tony Bird

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    Hi Dave,
    Shellac chucks and Gravers.....OK so what do you do for a day job Tony? ​
    I retired from the retail trade five years ago. So the answer would be making models, not very profitable but the best job I have had so far.
    The answer which I expect you have guessed is that after leaving secondary school at the age of fifteen I became an Indentured Apprentice in the watch, clock, instrument and jewellery trade. The workshop did repairs to all aspects of horology from 5 ligne Jaegers-le-Coultres to turret clocks and everything in between, including gramophones, musical boxes, cine cameras even clock work model toys. Some of the work was of national importance, thermographs for the local brewery! When I finished my time I went to work for the Buren Watch Company in Switzerland for a bit. On returning to the UK I became self employed which I remained for the rest of my working life. Finding repairing watches a bit boring I specialised in the repair of old clocks. This I did for many years before studying Gemology and gradually moving into the retail sector.
    Regards Tony.
    FBHI.
     
  19. Mar 22, 2011 #19

    Tony Bird

    Tony Bird

    Tony Bird

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    Hello again, back to the more interesting bit.
    Crank disc on two different shellac chucks.
    [​IMG]
    Drilling Crank disc using a jig held on a shellac chuck.
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    Centreing disc crank on shelac chuck.
    [​IMG]
    Cutting bearing.
    [​IMG]
    Drilling bearing through crank disc.
    [​IMG]
    Regards Tony.
     
  20. Mar 22, 2011 #20

    Tony Bird

    Tony Bird

    Tony Bird

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    Hi,
    Tapping bearing 12BA I think.
    [​IMG]
    Tools used.
    [​IMG]
    Commercial pinnions used on axle.
    [​IMG]
    Turning Crank Disc with an Axle.
    [​IMG]
    Checking fit.
    [​IMG]
    With luck a few more photographs again tomorrow.
    Regards Tony.
     

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