Online Metals ProtoBox

Discussion in 'Metals' started by vederstein, Nov 26, 2014.

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  1. Oct 29, 2018 #21

    DJP

    DJP

    DJP

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    I have a deal with the yard boss at a local scrap yard. As long as I wear construction boots and hard hat I can explore the bins of brass, aluminium, stainless and steel which I purchase by weight. It's amazing what you can find from manufacturers who recycle machine shop waste at the scrap yard.

    A prototyping box and shipping costs do not appeal.
     
  2. Oct 31, 2018 #22

    Wizard69

    Wizard69

    Wizard69

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    You are very lucky. Most of the scrap yards around here wouldn’t even let you in.
     
  3. Oct 31, 2018 #23

    Wizard69

    Wizard69

    Wizard69

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    This is true if you know what you want/need. If you are exploring an idea or trying to repair something having a random pile of stock doesn’t hurt. Usually though people build up that pile over time.

    The other thing here is that buying stock in these short length is expensive in an of itself. The mark up for ”the service” is often high. Often it can make sense to buy a longer length bar large enough in diameter to cover a number of parts. We run into this with emergency repairs all the time at work because stocking a large collection of materials is frowned upon. This a preference for larger diameter stock.
     
  4. Oct 31, 2018 #24

    ignator

    ignator

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    I picked up scrap metal in the past (0ver 35 years, still collecting) when getting my project material "pile" accumulated. I can think of at least 4 times in the last 25 years, where it became evident that the mystery steel was air hardening tool steel. One pass on the lathe just finished, or a drill press hole, and the next cut, the tooling is eaten.
    Luckily, I have a heat treat furnace to re-anneal the part to salvage it. But it takes 24 hours of slow cooling.
     

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