Newbie needs advice about a lathe

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ajoeiam

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Sometimes you need support at the tailstock end as you start parting off but beware of completing the part-off with the end still supported as it can jam and cause things to go wrong. I might start parting but stop when I have only a small bit left and remove the support while I finish the parting with a hacksaw.
Well - - - when you are parting off something when the cut-off is somewhat longer (needs to be supported in the process) it is possible to cut it and before one breaks through - - - like leave some margin - - - I'm not remembering any kind of exact amount at the moment - - - then you retract the tail stock quill just enough so there is no pressure - - - maybe even something like 0.060" - - - followed by holding the piece being cut off with the right and advancing the tool with the left with the idea of catching the piece as it is cut off.

If you are not holding the piece parallel to the part still chucked you can make a royal mess of things so if you are unsure of things you might be better served to use your hacksaw at that point and cut through the remaining nib - - - as far as possible from the good piece as possible.
(Then as you had left some stock for your exact length you can now face off the piece using a different tool.)
 

ajoeiam

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Hi K2,

This is from the Southbend 1934 manual, The cutter should be positioned on a line 5° from and above the centre of the workpiece, it's also the recommendation of Boxford:

View attachment 140060
Regards

TerryD
If you set your tool up at this 5 degrees above center you will find that if you are trying to face off your piece you will have issues.
Right on the center line works the best.

But - - - you are welcome to this however you wish.
(Issues will happen with HSS, brazed on carbide and cemented carbide tooling (likely also CBN and ceramics although I having done facing operations using either of those).)
 

Richard Hed

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So ugly and inelegant, like many US made up words like 'pled' instead of pleaded, 'dove' instead of dived,' snuck' instead of sneaked etc Ugh. if you fixed a faucet that leaks I think you'd say "it leaked" not "it luck". There are perfectly good words used for many many years in English derived from classical languages that have stood the test of time without making up new ones, perhaps it's just a lack of erudition?

Terry
I completely disagree with you. Languages change, else French, Spanish, Italian would all still be the original Latin. In the US, we use shortened forms of words which changes the language in itself, but also sthe WAY things are accented and pronounced also cause words to diverge. Thaty way you get one word that becomes two or more words, maybe the spelling is different or maybe the pronounciation is different. (The entrance is so entrancing.) So one might say that a speeded up language revolution is occurring in the US. BTW I prefer the Brit spelling of learnt over learned. If we are going to use "learned" then it should be spelt "lernd" or "learnd".
 

VicHobbyGuy

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There are perfectly good words used for many many years in English derived from classical languages that have stood the test of time without making up new ones, perhaps it's just a lack of erudition?

Terry
Languages change with time; especially English with all the words imported from other countries in the days of Empire (and before when French was the language of the Royal court, etc..). Don't rail against change - unless you speak Middle English (as in The Canterbury Tales) you're as guilty as the rest of us! :)

Or if you prefer: Languageſ changæ with sīquār; especiallī Saxọ̄̆nlī with unexceptid th' wordſ importede from othē̆r countrī̆se in th' adais ophe Emperālitē (anede beforæ whan Frē̆nsh waſ th' languagæ ophe th' kinekin court, etc..). Don'Þ rail againsÞ changæ - unlesſ thee speak bordar Saxọ̄̆nlī (aſ in th' Kentwærre ǧē̆sting) thee'ræ aſ guiltī aſ th' resÞ ophe ū̆s! :)
See:Modern English to Medieval English Translator ― LingoJam
 

Richard Hed

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Languages change with time; especially English with all the words imported from other countries in the days of Empire (and before when French was the language of the Royal court, etc..). Don't rail against change - unless you speak Middle English (as in The Canterbury Tales) you're as guilty as the rest of us! :)

Or if you prefer: Languageſ changæ with sīquār; especiallī Saxọ̄̆nlī with unexceptid th' wordſ importede from othē̆r countrī̆se in th' adais ophe Emperālitē (anede beforæ whan Frē̆nsh waſ th' languagæ ophe th' kinekin court, etc..). Don'Þ rail againsÞ changæ - unlesſ thee speak bordar Saxọ̄̆nlī (aſ in th' Kentwærre ǧē̆sting) thee'ræ aſ guiltī aſ th' resÞ ophe ū̆s! :)
See:Modern English to Medieval English Translator ― LingoJam
Yes, yes and yea! The old language had two symbols that expressed the "th" as in thin, that is, an unvocalized form, and a 'th" as in then, the vocalized form. These two symbols were like a backwards 6, the "then" form had a little cross on it. I prefer these two symbols but they are not on my keybord. It would help peo;ple trying to learn engrish as a second language too.
 
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During my first years in the general machineshop of Philips (now sold and the maker of the precision positioning systems of the world leading ASML chipmaking machines) I researched the amount of time spent on preparation and execution. In this machineshop (at the time comparable with GE-LEO) with production batches of 1 - 6 pieces it appeared that at each level the time spend in preparation was equal to the remaining time spend in execution. This means that the time spend to get the work on the shop floor, i.e. preparing the process plan, shop-planning, ordering material, cutting to length and getting the tools takes as much time as the production time in the shop. At the machine the set-up time roughly equals the running time for these small batches. And even during running time the time spend getting the tool in position equals the time spend in making chips (we found that one of the main benefits of NC control is the possibility of high speed positioning). So all together on average in this sophisticated one-off machineshop in the 1970's the time spend on making chips was at best 1/8 of total process time.
At one time we did the experiment to release the less complicated jobs without process plan, leaving it to the operators. But we found that this would often lead to an additional operation to make really sure that the parts came out OK - thereby increasing the number of operations on average from 6 to 7 with a similar increase in related throughput time.
So even now in my home machine shop I will spend solid time on job preparation!
 

HMEL

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Can anyone explain why we use uneccessary construct 'Newbie' (or even uglier - Noobie) when there is a perfectly good, shorter to type, more elegant word - Tyro (m. Novice)- from the Latin, so in use for over 1000 years and in English for at least 500 and in use certainly in the USA 😉😉

Best regards

TerryD
Yes, these words are derived from slang words from those who play video games. They do not use Latin or Greek (few do) and it becomes part of the culture. And almost every young person plays video games. Language is changing and reflects the culture it is in. And it is why science uses Greek and Latin because those are dead languages and do not change with time or culture. A word retains the meaning forever which is convenient in science and medicine. I doubt very few are exposed to those old languages. And I have no doubt that few are exposed to the power of good writing given the educational system we have created. So slang will prevail whether we like it or not.
 

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Yes, these words are derived from slang words from those who play video games. They do not use Latin or Greek (few do) and it becomes part of the culture. And almost every young person plays video games. Language is changing and reflects the culture it is in. And it is why science uses Greek and Latin because those are dead languages and do not change with time or culture. A word retains the meaning forever which is convenient in science and medicine. I doubt very few are exposed to those old languages. And I have no doubt that few are exposed to the power of good writing given the educational system we have created. So slang will prevail whether we like it or not.
During Viet Nam era, a fresh recruit with no experience in the feild was called a newby for New Boy,. which sometimes was shortened to noob, also.
 
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RE MT and relationship to center drills - there is no relation, other than if you are using a tiny center drill (say 1/16") and your tailstock uses an MT5 (e.g. a huge lathe) you would use an adapter to get to an MT1 or 2 size so you could mount a small chuck that could actually hold the little drill.

as for tool steel availability - I don't know about the UK specifically but you ought to be able to find burned out/dull tools for almost nothing from anybody with a production machine shop. Then some quality time with a grinder and you have a boring bar or whatever you need.

as for lathe centers, in this century, ball bearings are cheap and easy to get, so for your tailstock you would normally use a live center not a dead center. you can resharpen your centers if they get dull or worn with a carbide tool (if it's hardened). Of course you can also use a tool post grinder.
 
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It appears that in this multi-cultural forum we have started to bicker about "language" and pronunciation.
Surely, we should simply stick to the "Engineering and Machining issues"? - I am an old git who regularly cringes at some of the language used but recognise that mostly the message is truly transmitted - by all who use "English" as the common forum language. Even by those who do not have the fortune to have been raised and educated in "English, as she is spoke" - from 60 years ago - "like what I wus"...
Personally, I enjoy the language (and associated humour) - old and new - and have now fallen into the trap of discussing a distraction that I would prefer kept off this forum...
I'll just creep back into my little box and hide in my world of my prejudice...
K2
 

Richard Hed

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It appears that in this multi-cultural forum we have started to bicker about "language" and pronunciation.
Surely, we should simply stick to the "Engineering and Machining issues"? - I am an old git who regularly cringes at some of the language used but recognise that mostly the message is truly transmitted - by all who use "English" as the common forum language. Even by those who do not have the fortune to have been raised and educated in "English, as she is spoke" - from 60 years ago - "like what I wus"...
Personally, I enjoy the language (and associated humour) - old and new - and have now fallen into the trap of discussing a distraction that I would prefer kept off this forum...
I'll just creep back into my little box and hide in my world of my prejudice...
K2
I didn't feel that way. I thot it was simpl;y information which people were adding more info into . It is true however that the printed word (that is, the stuff we type) often comes out stronger feeling than if it was spoken especially amonge friendz
 
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Hi K2,

This is from the Southbend 1934 manual, The cutter should be positioned on a line 5° from and above the centre of the workpiece, it's also the recommendation of Boxford:

View attachment 140060
Regards

TerryD
[/QUOTE]

Hi Terry,
I find this "curious" - and have been looking at the diagram. I can only surmise at the engineering behind the "5 degree" placing of the cutting point.
If you take the design of a machine and draw lines of force - e.g. from the cutting point through to the bed of the lathe - there will be certain Neutral points/axes that it is desirable to hit with the lines of force, thus minimising or eliminating bending at various points in the transmission of the force from tool point to the head-stock. - Therefore I surmise that on the South Bend design the lines of force from tool point into the main saddle are optimised at the 5 degree angle.
Of course, the rake, clearance angles etc. must always be compensated for this 5 degree contact point rotation... as appears on the diagram of the tool.
I understand that "normal" tool clearance angles, rake, etc. are determined by toolmakers and engineers considering the tool to be introduced on the axis of the workpiece/machine, not above or below, as otherwise we would not know what to do?
K2
 

terryd

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Languages change with time; especially English with all the words imported from other countries in the days of Empire (and before when French was the language of the Royal court, etc..). Don't rail against change - unless you speak Middle English (as in The Canterbury Tales) you're as guilty as the rest of us! :)

Or if you prefer: Languageſ changæ with sīquār; especiallī Saxọ̄̆nlī with unexceptid th' wordſ importede from othē̆r countrī̆se in th' adais ophe Emperālitē (anede beforæ whan Frē̆nsh waſ th' languagæ ophe th' kinekin court, etc..). Don'Þ rail againsÞ changæ - unlesſ thee speak bordar Saxọ̄̆nlī (aſ in th' Kentwærre ǧē̆sting) thee'ræ aſ guiltī aſ th' resÞ ophe ū̆s! :)
See:Modern English to Medieval English Translator ― LingoJam
Hi VicHobbyGuy,
You are confusing language with vocabulary. I admit that I can't speak Anglo Saxon (although most of what you write is actually reasonably understandable with out consulting a translator as long as you know the symbols such as the thorn derived from a rune of the Elder Futhark or Fuþark). Neither can I speak old Scandinavian but I use their words almost daily - eg. day, night housewife, husband, son, daughter, pig, cow etc etc. But I can use contemporary language from the area I emanate from to confuse e.g. "Ah bist tha wench, bostin bin yo well keep on it 'n stay on the foad." ;) but I often have some difficulty with understanding friends from Newcastle on Tyne o_O.

Of course there were many changes in language and vocabulary especially before printing with movable type (C.1460 Gutenberg) and dictionaries to consult (Dr johnson C. 1750) plus cost reductions in the printed word and (almost) universal literacy. An example of misunderstanding I came across recently was in my genealogical researches, one branch of my family is called Griffiths, but in a church record of 1710, probably written by a semi literate rector, it was spelled Grifis. Which is the correct spelling, no one knows.

Yes, these words are derived from slang words from those who play video games. They do not use Latin or Greek (few do) and it becomes part of the culture. And almost every young person plays video games. Language is changing and reflects the culture it is in. And it is why science uses Greek and Latin because those are dead languages and do not change with time or culture. A word retains the meaning forever which is convenient in science and medicine. I doubt very few are exposed to those old languages. And I have no doubt that few are exposed to the power of good writing given the educational system we have created. So slang will prevail whether we like it or not.
Hi HMEL,
I disagree, most slang in by it's nature fashionable and hence ephemeral - where on earth would you find a slubberdegullion these days o_O. We use Greek and Latin in everyday language as well as for scientific use, e.g. video - 'I see' (Latin) - you probably like to take a photograph (Greek - photos +Graphos) or to watch a tele (Greek -distance) vision (Latin - see) such concatenations to produce new words to describe new technologies are not restricted to science and using them does not mean we are speaking either language but using the vocabulary. As are words from many other languages most based on PIE (Proto Indo European).

Slang can vasy it's maening and be confusing. With one letter change 'he's a real noob' to 'he's a real nob' has a very different meaning and a discussion of 'fanny' would be very interesting between a Brit and a Yank. A good example is the slang language Polari which is meant to be confusing. and of course trying to learn a new language which has a lot of slang is almost impossibe for a tyro in that language to really grok it. And of course, as slang is fashionable it usually goes out of fashion just as quickly and disappears making most slang so called 'dictionaries' unusable.

You too are confusing language with vocabulary, Anglo Saxon is dead as is old Scandinavin, Latin Greek etc etc but I use their words almost daily - e.g. Husband (House Bound i.e. tied to the family group), housewife, son, daughter, pig, cow, day, night, moon, sun and so on almost ad infinitum (see what I did😉). I also use Hindi - e.g. Bungalow, elephant, khaki etc etc. but I dont speak any of these languages. These words can be understood by consulting a dictionary especially now, as you point out we have the ubiquitous WWW.

Anyway enough has now been said on the subject as George Bernard Shaw (or perhaps Oscar Wilde) said we are "2 nations divided by a common language" - capiche:). Now let our tyro have his thread back,

TerryD
 

terryd

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It appears that in this multi-cultural forum we have started to bicker about "language" and pronunciation.
Surely, we should simply stick to the "Engineering and Machining issues"? - I am an old git who regularly cringes at some of the language used but recognise that mostly the message is truly transmitted - by all who use "English" as the common forum language. Even by those who do not have the fortune to have been raised and educated in "English, as she is spoke" - from 60 years ago - "like what I wus"...
Personally, I enjoy the language (and associated humour) - old and new - and have now fallen into the trap of discussing a distraction that I would prefer kept off this forum...
I'll just creep back into my little box and hide in my world of my prejudice...
K2
Hi K2,

I agree even if I started it with a simple query. I pray that I've finished it and left the thread back to John and his discussion, but I love the study of language as well as engineering o_O .

Hi K2,

This is from the Southbend 1934 manual, The cutter should be positioned on a line 5° from and above the centre of the workpiece, it's also the recommendation of Boxford:

View attachment 140060
Regards

TerryD

Hi Terry,
I find this "curious" - and have been looking at the diagram. I can only surmise at the engineering behind the "5 degree" placing of the cutting point.
If you take the design of a machine and draw lines of force - e.g. from the cutting point through to the bed of the lathe - there will be certain Neutral points/axes that it is desirable to hit with the lines of force, thus minimising or eliminating bending at various points in the transmission of the force from tool point to the head-stock. - Therefore I surmise that on the South Bend design the lines of force from tool point into the main saddle are optimised at the 5 degree angle.
Of course, the rake, clearance angles etc. must always be compensated for this 5 degree contact point rotation... as appears on the diagram of the tool.
I understand that "normal" tool clearance angles, rake, etc. are determined by toolmakers and engineers considering the tool to be introduced on the axis of the workpiece/machine, not above or below, as otherwise we would not know what to do?
K2
[/QUOTE]


I don't understand why this quotation has not presented itself correctly, I used the normal method for it :(, any ideas anyone?

Hi k2
Again I agree, but the tool in question is, I think (as far as I can think) supposed to be a RH roughing tool and the nearest line of its drawing is the rear of the top clearance angle?. If the idea is to take out any tendency for the tool to bend (submarine?) the rake would not change, but the front clearance might. Personally I have always set my tooling just above the centre line and then adjusted it as I see fit according to how it is cutting. I had such a problem yesterday when machining some thin 'fishbelly' (damn - language issues again 😖) links for the Stephenson linkages on a Stuart beam engine I'm refurbishing, it took a while to get exactly the almost perfect cut. As you said earlier it pays to take time for setting up, sometimes much longer than the actual job in hand.

Best regards
TerryD
 

terryd

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.................

as for lathe centers, in this century, ball bearings are cheap and easy to get, so for your tailstock you would normally use a live center not a dead center. you can resharpen your centers if they get dull or worn with a carbide tool (if it's hardened). Of course you can also use a tool post grinder.
Hi Bill,

I generally agree with that sentiment but there are occasions,when the bulk of the body of a live centre gets in the way, especially when using a QC toolpost such as the Dixson type and needing to machine at the tailstock end of the work, then a dead centre is needed, or even a half centre if trying to face the end of a long job while it is still supported. I think in such circumstances that it's good practice to get used to using a dead centre, and a live centre at other times.

TerryD
 

terryd

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I completely disagree with you. Languages change, else French, Spanish, Italian would all still be the original Latin. In the US, we use shortened forms of words which changes the language in itself, but also sthe WAY things are accented and pronounced also cause words to diverge. Thaty way you get one word that becomes two or more words, maybe the spelling is different or maybe the pronounciation is different. (The entrance is so entrancing.) So one might say that a speeded up language revolution is occurring in the US. BTW I prefer the Brit spelling of learnt over learned. If we are going to use "learned" then it should be spelt "lernd" or "learnd".
You are confusing language and vocabulary, the bulk of words in English are of ancient origin even words to describe new technologies such as televison or photogaph are concatenations of more ancient words. 'Language' is a comination of grammar, structure and vocabulary. Words can accepted from other languages, of course, but they are existing words from the root of the language then absorbed, used and codified into the vocabulary, very, very rarely are real additions just made up. Slang and vernacular words are generally transient and ephemeral easily lost, for example try finding a 'slubberdegullion' these days. As I've said elsewhere a discussion of 'Fanny' between a Brit and a Yank would be interesting as there is no common meaning between the two cultures using a supposedly common language. And of course Greek, Latin, French and Engllish are just a few of the languages rooted in the PIE.

Shortened words (aka abbreviations), change only the spoken language unless otherwise codified by being accepted into a dictionary etc.

By the way, we generally spell the word learned but pronounce it learnt as a past participle but learned with annunciation of the final e is applied to one who is well educated or wise i.e. 'he is very learned and he learned his wisdom years ago', one word two pronunciations and two meanings.
 

terryd

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It appears that in this multi-cultural forum we have started to bicker about "language" and pronunciation.
Surely, we should simply stick to the "Engineering and Machining issues"? - I am an old git who regularly cringes at some of the language used but recognise that mostly the message is truly transmitted - by all who use "English" as the common forum language. Even by those who do not have the fortune to have been raised and educated in "English, as she is spoke" - from 60 years ago - "like what I wus"...
Personally, I enjoy the language (and associated humour) - old and new - and have now fallen into the trap of discussing a distraction that I would prefer kept off this forum...
I'll just creep back into my little box and hide in my world of my prejudice...
K2
Hi K2,

I agree even if I started it with a simple query. I pray that I've finished it and left the thread back to John and his discussion, but I love the study of language as well as engineering o_O .

Hi K2,

This is from the Southbend 1934 manual, The cutter should be positioned on a line 5° from and above the centre of the workpiece, it's also the recommendation of Boxford:

View attachment 140060
Regards

TerryD

Hi Terry,
I find this "curious" - and have been looking at the diagram. I can only surmise at the engineering behind the "5 degree" placing of the cutting point.
If you take the design of a machine and draw lines of force - e.g. from the cutting point through to the bed of the lathe - there will be certain Neutral points/axes that it is desirable to hit with the lines of force, thus minimising or eliminating bending at various points in the transmission of the force from tool point to the head-stock. - Therefore I surmise that on the South Bend design the lines of force from tool point into the main saddle are optimised at the 5 degree angle.
Of course, the rake, clearance angles etc. must always be compensated for this 5 degree contact point rotation... as appears on the diagram of the tool.
I understand that "normal" tool clearance angles, rake, etc. are determined by toolmakers and engineers considering the tool to be introduced on the axis of the workpiece/machine, not above or below, as otherwise we would not know what to do?
K2
[/QUOTE]


I don't understand why this quotation has not presented itself correctly, I used the normal method for it :(, any ideas anyone?

Hi k2
Again I agree, but the tool in question is, I think (as far as I can think) supposed to be a RH roughing tool and the nearest line of its drawing is the rear of the top clearance angle?. If the idea is to take out any tendency for the tool to bend (submarine?) the rake would not change, but the front clearance might. Personally I have always set my tooling just above the centre line and then adjusted it as I see fit according to how it is cutting. I had such a problem yesterday when machining some thin 'fishbelly' (damn - language issues again 😖) links for the Stephenson linkages on a Stuart beam engine I'm refurbishing, it took a while to get exactly the almost perfect cut. As you said earlier it pays to take time for setting up, sometimes much longer than the actual job in hand.

Best regards
TerryD
 

Richard Hed

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You are confusing language and vocabulary, the bulk of words in English are of ancient origin even words to describe new technologies such as televison or photogaph are concatenations of more ancient words. 'Language' is a comination of grammar, structure and vocabulary. Words can accepted from other languages, of course, but they are existing words from the root of the language then absorbed, used and codified into the vocabulary, very, very rarely are real additions just made up. Slang and vernacular words are generally transient and ephemeral easily lost, for example try finding a 'slubberdegullion' these days. As I've said elsewhere a discussion of 'Fanny' between a Brit and a Yank would be interesting as there is no common meaning between the two cultures using a supposedly common language. And of course Greek, Latin, French and Engllish are just a few of the languages rooted in the PIE.

Shortened words (aka abbreviations), change only the spoken language unless otherwise codified by being accepted into a dictionary etc.

By the way, we generally spell the word learned but pronounce it learnt as a past participle but learned with annunciation of the final e is applied to one who is well educated or wise i.e. 'he is very learned and he learned his wisdom years ago', one word two pronunciations and two meanings.
Some of what you say I agree with. Language before the great wars was known to change about 10% per century. If hyou thimpfks about it, that is quite a lot really. In that case, however, how could Brit Eng NOT diverge from Amer Eng? Hell, in the US alone, the SW of USA speakes a lot differently than those from the east coast and even the NW. Louisiana is known for two centuries to have widely different set of, as you say, vocabulary if not actually structur of the language. It has to do with the French, African and Amerindian language influences and creolization. Regionalization and static movements of people contribute.

Howver, since, and due to partially, the great wars, language change has accelerated and continues to accelerate. Indeed, since WWI, words have begun to appear that are only indirectly related to former words of the language, e.g. LASER, Snafu, many of the words related to computer usage: byte, and many more, with increases of technology which never had words before. And Yes, many words are made up from other languages but others are not. the word 'hypo' in different technologies has completly different meanings.

I'm curious, does Brit Eng have the word "boondocks" in it? It is a Philippino word.

PS, I like this discussion and I don't take what anyone here says acrimoniiously.
 
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Terry, On the subject of the tool cutting point set 5 degeers above the centre of rotation of the workpiece:
Suppose a 3 to 4 degree clearance on a tool. It will rub at the contact tangent on the workpiece if 5 degrees high. But only start cutting if 5 degrees or more clearance angle.
Also the rake angle will cage per the 5 degree offset. So a zero angle rake on a tool becomes 5 degrees of rake, a tool selected withe 3 degrees positive rake will become 2 degrees negative rake, a 5 degree negative rake will become 10 degrees working rake, etc.
Sorry. It seems crazy to me.
Can anyone explain? IT's not just a language problem....
K2
 

terryd

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Some of what you say I agree with. Language before the great wars was known to change about 10% per century. If hyou thimpfks about it, that is quite a lot really. In that case, however, how could Brit Eng NOT diverge from Amer Eng? Hell, in the US alone, the SW of USA speakes a lot differently than those from the east coast and even the NW. Louisiana is known for two centuries to have widely different set of, as you say, vocabulary if not actually structur of the language. It has to do with the French, African and Amerindian language influences and creolization. Regionalization and static movements of people contribute.

Howver, since, and due to partially, the great wars, language change has accelerated and continues to accelerate. Indeed, since WWI, words have begun to appear that are only indirectly related to former words of the language, e.g. LASER, Snafu, many of the words related to computer usage: byte, and many more, with increases of technology which never had words before. And Yes, many words are made up from other languages but others are not. the word 'hypo' in different technologies has completly different meanings.

I'm curious, does Brit Eng have the word "boondocks" in it? It is a Philippino word.

PS, I like this discussion and I don't take what anyone here says acrimoniiously.
Hi Richard,
no we don't use the term boondocks, we are though aquainted with it from US culture i.e films and songs especially. You mention the intermixing of languages, English itself is a mongrel language not only was it influenced by Celtic langages but by Latin, (Roman occupation and ecclesiastical use), Anglo Saxon (High German), Scandinavian (Danish, Norwegian and Swedish), Norman French and actual French (our so called imperial system of measures are actualy based of French or other European terms and only fully defined in theh middle of the 19th C. after the establishment of the more logical Metric system) as well as through our vast Empire accross the world.
Words you mention such as LASER (acronym for Light Amplified Stimulated - something - Radiation), snafu likewise (I'm too polite to explain that acronym), hypo is a Greek word (under) borrowed by the Romans hence hypocaust (underfloor heating) and Hypochlorite (fixing photographs etc) I think because it is an anion (negatively charged oxygen atom = minus or 'below') also hence hypochondria (below par in health terms) hypothermia (below normal temperature) etc so 'hypo' still has only one meaning it is the cocatenated terms which have different meanings. Byte is of course an abbreviation of binary digit and most other terms in computing are either derivations of normal words, abbreviations or acromyms and are used for specialised discussion (aka jargon) but some spill over into popular usage but all of these have developed in response to the needs of new technology,
I would still argue that a 'novice' of the Romans is still a 'novice' today so there is no need to 'make up' a new description when there is a perfectly good, quite well known, more elegant, less ugly existing word which has stood the test of time - I find that ridiculous just as changing the name of a, say, horse (Roman - Hippo, hippopotamus = River Horse, strange imagination those Romans) to say, piglettio o_O just because you can.
Glad you've enjoyed the discussion I also try not to take or give acrimony or insult anyone. You have to love language, it separates us from the rest of the animal kingdom - no let's not start another discussion that's just an observation. 😉

TerryD
 
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