Myford lathe

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goldstar31

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The conversation about the ML7 and the Super 7 should be taken with caution as the ML7 has 65 teeth whereas the Super 7 has 60. They are not the same.

As Braze is Brass, you can machine it or even file it if push comes to shove.

Try sales@myford-stuff.co.uk he also has website
 
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RonW

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doog1964@hotmail.co.uk is a gentleman I have dealt with for years for Myford parts. I've been to his emporium and he has hundreds of stripped Myford parts. He ships all over the world. Give him a try.
While you have the headstock stripped check if the pulley assembly is lubricatable or not. Mine wasn't and was nearly siezed when I got it. There is a direct replacement from later machines that has a lubricator nipple in the bed of the center pulley. Ron W
 

ALEX1952

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In the past for my lathe, an old Wilson was to find a gear of the correct form etc turn down the O/D of the old one, bore the new one to suit and weld together.
 

PSACstuff

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Good day folks,
I recently purchased a classic ML7 made in 1953. This is my first lathe. It has the original spindle and Lead indium bearings. It appears tights and the wear is not significant. The back 65T gear behind the spindle head as one tooth partly broken. This is likely because a prior owner locked the back gear while removing the chuck. I got a new replacement. Wondering if the removal of the gear can be easily achieved without dismantling the the cast pillow block housing that hold the bearings. Or is it better to dismantle everything.
I have seen a video on you tube where someone take a plastic mallet and removed the spindle by gently hitting from the very back of the spindle.

I would like to know what are some concerns that need to be addressed before undertaking the task.

Regards
Terry
 

ALEX1952

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It should have read:-
In the past I needed to replace a spur gear with a broken tooth on my lathe, my old but very sevicable slant bed Wilson. The solution was to find a gear of the correct form turn down the O/D of the old one, bore the new one to suit and weld together. Its still going strong.
 

packrat

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Good day folks,
I recently purchased a classic ML7 made in 1953. This is my first lathe. It has the original spindle and Lead indium bearings. It appears tights and the wear is not significant. The back 65T gear behind the spindle head as one tooth partly broken. This is likely because a prior owner locked the back gear while removing the chuck. I got a new replacement. Wondering if the removal of the gear can be easily achieved without dismantling the the cast pillow block housing that hold the bearings. Or is it better to dismantle everything.
I have seen a video on you tube where someone take a plastic mallet and removed the spindle by gently hitting from the very back of the spindle.

I would like to know what are some concerns that need to be addressed before undertaking the task.

Regards
Terry
Hi Terry Looks like me and you are in the same boat with the broken back dear on the ML7 Myford lathe, I would like to see that youtube video about removing the back gear..The ones I have found are not clear about pressing off the gear..packrat
IMG_1859.JPG
 

DanP

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Did I miss something? Are you guys saying you or the lathes previous owner broke these gear teeth off by using the back gear to lock the spindle so the chuck can be removed?
 

packrat

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In my case it was the previous heavy handed non lathe person that broke the back gear {my Myford 7 is some what aparts right now and I have not run it yet}..
I say heavy handed because there are other marks on the lathe like arc strikes {2} and spanner teeth marks plus lots of grease..??? both drip feed oilers are broke
and not usable..
 

RonW

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Hi Packrat, You will have to totally dismantle the shaft assembly to remove the bull gear. The damage you have looks to me like someone tried to engage the low speed gears while the lathe was running. The bull gear slides off the shaft backwards once you remove the grub screw(s) in the front of the gear boss.

As I mentioned in my previous post you might want to change that pulley cluster. I can't tell from your photo if yours is one that can be lubricated. When I got mine, serial number indicates it is 1949 vintage, the pulley assembly was almost seized on the shaft due to no lubrication getting to the pulley block bearing surfaces. I purchased a later version which has a Zerk fitting in the face of the large pulley behind the small gear that allows it to be lubed with an oil gun. I believe Christopher Dooley supplied the parts. I know they came off Ebay.
RonW
 

Hopper

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You can buy those gear clusters brand new from Myford in the UK. They have an eBay store too. Not worth messing about with a used gear that could be in similarly abused condition and about to let go. It's a common failure, due usually to locking the spindle and whaling on the chuck key with a hammer to free a stuck chuck.

You can drill and press in a pin to the side of the new gear which can be used then to lock the spindle with a block between the pin and the headstock housing. Or follow Myfords instruction manual and turn the chuck backwards by the belts or motor until a jaw hits on a piece of wood stood on the bed.

Put a new belt on it too while you have the headstock spindle out to change the gear. A "cogged belt" works best. It's a regular V belt but with notches in the inner surface that lets it bend around those small pulleys better than a solid V belt. The old belts harden with age and may look ok but slip under load.
 

skyline1

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Packrat

Whilst you have it dismantled check the little serrated dog that locks the bull gear assembly in high gear. If the bull gear teeth are stripped it's a good bet that this is damaged too

Best Regards Mark
 

goldstar31

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I tend to agree with Hopper and would mention that both manuals are available on the internet and again, both manuals i.e. for the ML7 and the Super7 show a tapered wooden wedge being used against the respective bull wheels. The manual is there- why not use it?
Again, whilst the lathe is in bits, it is time to go through what was bought with a fine tooth comb and see what the condition of of the feed screws and there respective nuts. For my part in all of this, I cannot honestly imagine the 'Chinese metal' nuts not being worn- if not that the whole assemblies needing replacement.
Again, the oil cups need replacing and from my long experience of such things, should be replaced with NEW and unworn parts.

I'm sorry but I have received a succession of very worrying occurrences of death and worse in the past 24 hours.
One of my very close friends wrapped my knuckles about 'penny pinching' and that much forgotten Northumbrian tune which includes the words about 'skinning a rat for its hide and fat'

Well, with luck today I should have an almost new Myford Super7 with gear box and power cross feed.
My opinions whilst others may differ

Norman
 
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PSACstuff

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Thank you for your input. I will take the opportunity to put a fresh belt on the lathe
terry
 

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