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My first boiler

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Steamchick

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Very pretty models - I am sure all runs well. But I was an Engineer (not Mechanic, Machinist or Fitter) and I weep at the innocence of really good model builders when they simply haven't been taught the Engineering. ANY exposed copper is a No! No! The lost heat is most of what you expend your effort trying to get into the steam. Please lag the boiler and ALL steam pipes and fittings. If you want polished brass and copper, I suggest you make jewellery, or keep it for the cold parts, maker's plate, etc.
Also in "real" steam plant, the super heater is after the regulator for 2 reasons. One is safety - if the superheater fails you can shut the valve and shut-down the fire before you empty a full boiler of steam - the second reason is to get the super-heat as close to the engine as possible. Stuart models do it the other way for convenience.
Displacement lubricators do work with super-heated steam.
Traditionally, models were made as people were not so well educated that the Works owner or Manager could read drawings, so a model was an accurate representation and could explain many features to make the sale more easy. Even back in Egyptian times! Also more recently, models are a cheap way for the design to be proven, without the cost of the full sized job. But we all, including me, make these toys (not proper models) because we enjoy it. I applaude the expertise of the few real model makers.
It has to be your choice as to whether you want a functionally representative model, or a working toy. Be proud of whatever you choose to make. And please be careful to avoid burning down another workshop! A lesson for us all there. Thanks.
 

Richard Hed

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Very pretty models - I am sure all runs well. But I was an Engineer (not Mechanic, Machinist or Fitter) and I weep at the innocence of really good model builders when they simply haven't been taught the Engineering. ANY exposed copper is a No! No! The lost heat is most of what you expend your effort trying to get into the steam. Please lag the boiler and ALL steam pipes and fittings. If you want polished brass and copper, I suggest you make jewellery, or keep it for the cold parts, maker's plate, etc.
Also in "real" steam plant, the super heater is after the regulator for 2 reasons. One is safety - if the superheater fails you can shut the valve and shut-down the fire before you empty a full boiler of steam - the second reason is to get the super-heat as close to the engine as possible. Stuart models do it the other way for convenience.
Displacement lubricators do work with super-heated steam.
Traditionally, models were made as people were not so well educated that the Works owner or Manager could read drawings, so a model was an accurate representation and could explain many features to make the sale more easy. Even back in Egyptian times! Also more recently, models are a cheap way for the design to be proven, without the cost of the full sized job. But we all, including me, make these toys (not proper models) because we enjoy it. I applaude the expertise of the few real model makers.
It has to be your choice as to whether you want a functionally representative model, or a working toy. Be proud of whatever you choose to make. And please be careful to avoid burning down another workshop! A lesson for us all there. Thanks.
Thank yew for telling me that. I noticed that the "super heaters" tended to be on the bottom and I certainly scratched my head over that. Hot air is lighter and the hotter it is, the lighter it is even when under pressure (lesser so however when under pressure) therefore the super heater should be at the top where excess heat from the burner can attack it and heat it even more just before it enters the cylinder where it does it's work. I have designed a couple household sized boilers and this is standard procedure. The first one I built was a barrel type that I didn't like so I completely redesigned the second one which is like the arches of a cathedral with a super heater above that. The tubes being "water-tubes".

Also, it has a greater design in that it suks up as much waste heat as possible to heat potable water for drinking (Earl Grey used to be my favorite, but now it is Black Currant tea), showering or other hot water uses. The waste steam, that is, exhaust was to be used for heating one's house and/or cooking with (you needs special cooking ware for this). During summer time this waste exhaust can preheat the injectable water for the steam generator or be piped outside. Of course, the most important item is the power from steam engine to electric generator to run your computer and internet so you can talk to me! One last item is that the smoke from any polluting smoke is also to be used as heating one's home. The new (to me anyway) rocket stoves that teach the smoke to heat bricks I now incorporate into the system. this way, very little smoke actually pollutes the air and it takes FAR less wood or fuel as the heat isn't being all dumped into the air.

Thus, a powerful SYSTEM does nearly everything except build the house. I live in the city, and don't want to quarrel with the powers that be and haven't implemented this into a house yet, my other house being in the Philippines where it isn't practicable to "heat the house" (LOL). I wish I lived in Montana or Idaho where this would be a welcome thing amongst the living.

As far as the models go, I tend to believe if it does't generate something, usually electricity, but could grind a pot of flour or coffee beans then why is it being built? I get it, I get it--they are tremendous fun, and of course items to brag about, even so, I always get that nagging feeling--what does it do besides spin? Besides all that, I am a prepper and believe that terrible disaster is INEVITABLE. The only reason I believe this is because of the weather, Man cannot control the weather and one day, the crops will fail like they did with the Irish in 1834. We now have strange weather, don't know for sure what it means, but as long as I am playing with these toys, might as well make them useful.
 

DavidLloyd2

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I'm nearing the completion of my boiler project. It is barely tested and operational. I stil have some work left on the burner. there is a thread here on this subject that I will attend to.View attachment 116390View attachment 116391View attachment 116392View attachment 116393View attachment 116394View attachment 116395View attachment 116396View attachment 116397View attachment 116399View attachment 116400
Hi guys,
Hav had some time in the shop lately and did some progress on my boler. I have no plans, so I just build as I go.
Did a trial assembly before I'm going to paint some of it.
Since this is my first boiler, I have no experience running a steam engine on live steam, so I'm exited about how it will work. If there is some obvious flaws in the construction, I will appreciate some feedback. I have been looking at a whole lot of builds though, so I believe it can't be all that far off.
I found it both easier to make and better looking to use rivets rather than bending the brass sheets and silver solder. Sheet metal work is actually not all that simple to get right without having the proper tools.
Made all the valves and fittings to.

Rudy

View attachment 113952 View attachment 113954 View attachment 113955

The Stuart 10V sitting by and patiently overlooking the progress, longing to breath in some real live
I'm nearing the completion of my boiler project. It is barely tested and operational. I stil have some work left on the burner. there is a thread here on this subject that I will attend to.View attachment 116390View attachment 116391View attachment 116392View attachment 116393View attachment 116394View attachment 116395View attachment 116396View attachment 116397View attachment 116399View attachment 116400
Hi Rudy
That is a really nice boiler you have built congratulations. and nice work on the setup with the V10,

Thanks for sharing,

DavidLloyd
 
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deeferdog

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Just beautiful Rudy, I don't know about you, but I couldn't bear to lag it! Bugger the efficiency. Cheers, Peter
 

Rudy

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No question that I'm heating up just about everything around me when running this plant. I just love the exposed copper as much as a pretty mahogany lagging. Was thinking maybe the lagging would catch fire since there is an open flame just underneath in the not so tight "fire box".
Efficiency is of cause not important for a display / toy / just-for-fun plant.
Rudy
 

Peter Twissell

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Thank yew for telling me that. I noticed that the "super heaters" tended to be on the bottom and I certainly scratched my head over that. Hot air is lighter and the hotter it is, the lighter it is even when under pressure (lesser so however when under pressure) therefore the super heater should be at the top where excess heat from the burner can attack it and heat it even more just before it enters the cylinder where it does it's work. I have designed a couple household sized boilers and this is standard procedure. The first one I built was a barrel type that I didn't like so I completely redesigned the second one which is like the arches of a cathedral with a super heater above that. The tubes being "water-tubes".
Superheaters are located in the high temperature area of the firebox, which is not neccessarily the top. As hot gasses pass the boiler, they cool by transferring heat to the boiler wall and on to the water (that's the primary function).
In 'pot' boilers (with no firetubes) superheaters are often placed below the boiler, where the combustion gas is hottest.
In locomotive boilers, they are often placed inside oversized firetubes.
 

fcheslop

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A nice boiler and for its purpose more than adequate
Lets be honest if efficiency was a concern a simple pot boiler would not be my choice
Steam dryers can be useful although simple oscillators run better on wet steam
I doubt very much that many models reach super heated steam temps and if they did the engines would suffer
My last flash plant used to burn out hard faced valves on a regular basis.
A bit of bling is nice to see well done on the splendid job you have done
From a lowly rag hand who had to fix the big Es ba44s ups on a regular basis
keep well
 

Richard Hed

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Superheaters are located in the high temperature area of the firebox, which is not neccessarily the top. As hot gasses pass the boiler, they cool by transferring heat to the boiler wall and on to the water (that's the primary function).
In 'pot' boilers (with no firetubes) superheaters are often placed below the boiler, where the combustion gas is hottest.
In locomotive boilers, they are often placed inside oversized firetubes.
Yes, I understand that about the highest heat being at the bottom, even so, there is plenty of hot waste heat to superheat at the top too--probably not a good idea for industrial sized machines but the problem I see with supers on the bottom is that it would take special construction care for amateurs in the larger sized boilers for home size or shop size. I'm going to incorporate your views into my next version, however, because it is very sound.
 

Richard Hed

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A nice boiler and for its purpose more than adequate
Lets be honest if efficiency was a concern a simple pot boiler would not be my choice
Steam dryers can be useful although simple oscillators run better on wet steam
I doubt very much that many models reach super heated steam temps and if they did the engines would suffer
My last flash plant used to burn out hard faced valves on a regular basis.
A bit of bling is nice to see well done on the splendid job you have done
From a lowly rag hand who had to fix the big Es ba44s ups on a regular basis
keep well
Can you tell me what an Es ba44 is?
 

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