Model plane with engine

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xf8u39

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This is not an RC plane. I believe you start the engine and let it go.
I'm not sure what type of fuel it takes but the prop turns freely.
The wing is held to fuselage by an elastic band, which has snapped.
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Barnbikes

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Your plane is what is known a line controlled. There are 2 strings that attach to one handle and basically it flies in a circle around you till it runs out of gas. Some guys get pretty good at flying them and can do some pretty neat tricks.
 

deverett

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Looks like a Cox glo-plug engine powered control line model.

The plane will have two lines secured to the bellcrank in the middle of the fuselage. The pilot stands so that the two lines are taut and an assistant fires up the engine and launches the plane by hand. The plane goes round and round in circles and is controlled by the pilots handle connecting the two lines until the pilot either gets dizzy or the engine runs out of fuel - hopefully the latter.

Dave
The Emerald Isle
 

Blogwitch

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This model was classed as a 'trainer' to get you used to flying control line models.

Unfortunately, it was very far from the truth.

The engine just wasn't powerful enough to give a good sideways thrust to keep the lines taut, and having only half an aerofoil on the main wing didn't help much either, and so many crashes occured without ever flying more than a few feet. Luckily this one was made of rather resilient but heavy plastic and stood up well to the frequent crashes.

They later brought out a series of war birds to the same sorts of design, unfortunately, they also suffered from lack of power and the plastic was more brittle resulting in many broken parts after each crash.

Because of all this, and their very high cost for the time, they never really became popular here in the UK, so we tended to stick with the old balsa traditional models.

John
 

DICKEYBIRD

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You Brits must've had thinner air back in the 50's when the PT's came out. Mine flew GREAT and their reed-valve Cox engines had way more power for their size & weight than other engines of that era (Wen-Mac, OK Cub, etc.)

There were tons of youngsters that got a successful start in model aviation (and later on, full scale) flying the ubiquitous Cox PT-19.

That's my story and I'm sticking to it!:)
 

Mechanicboy

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I am old model airplane pilot. The plane is a Cox PT-19. The Cox engine need fuel with 15-30% nitromethane and 20% castor oil since the engine is small and need high nitromethane to works very well and high castor oil in fuel due the engine has piston with the connecting rod attached inside as a ball joint and preventing failure with crankshaft/bearing. Never run engine with fuel who has pure syntetic oil! In case fuel with 20% castor oil is unavailable in your local hobby dealer, buy fuel who has 20-30% nitromethane + 10% syntetic oil or low and add 10% or more castor oil (total 20% oil of castor oil + syntetic oil in fuel).

Follow the user manual how to operate the Cox engine. :)
http://www.mh-aerotools.de/airfoils/documents/cox_049_operation_and_troubleshooting_guide.pdf
 

Mechanicboy

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The engine just wasn't powerful enough to give a good sideways thrust to keep the lines taut, and having only half an aerofoil on the main wing didn't help much either, and so many crashes occured without ever flying more than a few feet. Luckily this one was made of rather resilient but heavy plastic and stood up well to the frequent crashes.


John
I had the differnce Cox linecontrolled planes in young age...

Keep engine high reeving with enough nitromethane without leaning out the fuel (enough oil out of exhaust port) to keep fast enough to rise of ground. The line must not be to long to slacken out line. The line length for a Cox trainer is 7 meter/ 23 feet and not more. When you are flying the plane: Go back around in ring in center to prevent you are dizzy and the lines is taut. Do not try various aircraft maneuver because the Cox PT-19 is not an aerobatic plane.
 

Tin Falcon

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XF so far you have posted two threads . and it seems the only reason you are here is to find the value of things you have acquired and try to sell them.

That is not what this forum is about. It is about learning to build model engines and and experienced folk helping other learn to build and create.
so if you are here to learn about building models you are at the right place if you are here to sell your yard sale finds at a profit please use e- bay or other appropriate venue.
The buy sell trade area is for active forum members.
Tin
 

aonemarine

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I had one of those control line planes back about 30 years ago. I remember its first flight very clearly, it went up and up and over and straight back down. Total flight time 3.5 seconds...
I lost all interest in r/c planes after that...
 

xf8u39

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What better place to sell a model engine than on a model engine forum?

Besides, on a personal level Mr Falcon, what harm has it done you?

I was seriously considering making a donation to this forum had the engines been sold on here and also looking forward to posting many more questions/answers etc in future.

That will not be happening now thanks to your comments.

Finally, on a different note, I have purchased a small lathe with the intention of producing small parts, not only for model engines but motorcycle engines too.
This renders your post unnecessary.

Please feel free to delete my post or ban me if you like - I've done nothing wrong.
 

Swifty

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Your mention of possibly making a donation after selling is very suspicious, the first thing that you should have done is read the rules. A lot of people try to use these sites to sell things, having no clue as to what the are selling. So, you have purchased a lathe to make parts, do you intend to make complete model engines for your own enjoyment, or just parts to sell.

If I win the lottery, I might possibly make a donation to all the members, but then probably not.

Paul.
 

Tin Falcon

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Finally, on a different note, I have purchased a small lathe with the intention of producing small parts, not only for model engines but motorcycle engines too.
This renders your post unnecessary.

Please feel free to delete my post or ban me if you like - I've done nothing wrong.
Well sir: The only way we have to know your motives here is by what you post.
Please read the rules and follow them .

http://www.homemodelenginemachinist.com/showthread.php?t=9065
You have broken several rules. And i am attempting to educate you as to the culture of this forum.This forum is about learning and teaching.
Tin
 

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