Mini mill X axis gib Up grade Is it posible?

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albert_chuy

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Hello,

Another newbie here I have purchase a mini mill (Harbor freight version)
I don’t have much experience on milling, only what I read about and
At work when I’m stalking the Tool shop guys trying to learn and understand what there doing but o well.

I have been trying to adjust the X axis gib because it can wobble in the Y direction (back and forth) the only thing I have found on line is that you have to tighten the 4 screw against the steel strip that’s in the inside but the only moment I get no wobble out of the table is when the setscrew’s are really tight and its really hard on my hand to turn the handle.

Is it Possible to replace that strip of steel with one that has the complete length of the table and replace the setscrews with some of those set screws that have a ball bearing in the tip.

Sorry for the Nob question but the gib and screws just seems so primitive to me.
 

velocette

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Hi Albert
"Is it Possible to replace the setscrews with some of those set screws that have a ball bearing in the tip."

Yes a "Loose" ball bearing at the end of the set screws are an improvement I can recommend Looks like I< o >= I being the gib and = being the screw.

The set screw and lock nut is primitive but is very effective been in use for over one hundred years.

The secret of setting up is in the "feel" Use the allen key with the long leg in the screw and tighten it until it is finger tight firm only then hold it firm and tighten the Locknut making sure that the setscrew does not turn.

Checking the adjustment by moving the table with the hand wheel. Repeat this on each screw. It is all in the "Feel" of the tools and hand wheel.

I did a similar project with and X2 mill Drill that made it much more user friendly.

Add a small tip. Use "Cup Point" grub screws for gib adjustment and a "Ball Bearing" that is "Tapping Size" for the Gib Screw I.E 6 mm thread 5 mm ball bearing.

You may have to use a hand drill to tidy up the dimples in the gib as sometimes the finish on some X2 mills.
leaves a lot to be desired.

This leaves dismantle and a tidy up a necessity.

Some users advocate using a brass on bronze gibs.

"Is it Possible to replace that strip of steel with one that has the complete length of the table".

Sorry but I may have not understood properly But would the gib strip the length of the table not prevent it moving at all.

I see you are new to the forum keep asking questions there is masses of information to be gained from much wiser heads than mine.

Enjoy

Eric
 
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goldstar31

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Actually there is a write up of the problems with pointed set screws in gib adjustment etc in the GH Thomas Model Engineers Workshop Manual publisher Tee. GHT also goes into the use of pegging the gib.
I did it -with a locking screw on a vertical slide which was probably off an old early numbered Myford.
The casting number FWIW is MA6905.

There is a bit of prattle( my views) on various forums about the same topic. The best gibs- again my opinion- are those that actually take up the whole cavity- and dont rock about like peas on drums. One solution-adopted by Myford was the use of laminated shims.
 
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goldstar31

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I was having a think. Let's face it, some of us have come a long way. Maybe, he might not manage to make a new gib or rounded set of screws or wield a scraper and a pot of blue. What then? Probably, I'd cheat and build up the hollow part with metal- by making shims out of - perhaps drinks cans and glueing them onto the existing gib with an epoxy two part glue and when all was firm drilling oversize holes to locate the existing adjusting screws.

Years ago, I filled a worn bit on a very rough lathe with car body paste- the metal filled variety. I've also got tucked away somewhere how someone ground a worn bit of a vee bed lathe- and stuck a bit of tinplate to the cut out bit- and scraped the lot- with a homemade grinder on a miniature grinder. Think that it was in Model Engineer.
 

enfieldbullet

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then i would suggest 'lapping' the gib in a granite counter top with sandpaper.

that is also something not so good but probably good enough for a beginner that can't scrape it to fit.
 

Tin Falcon

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Do not be afraid to replace the set screws the originals are not great.
Tin
 

goldstar31

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Following on from Enfieldbullet, it is worth finding a bit of plate glass. Not the sort that ordinary windows are made from but the thicker variety from shop fronts etc. Get a glazier to cut it into a nice rectangle and fit it all into a wooden frame. You then have a very useful marking out table or surface plate. Instead of Dykem or Engineers Blue you can use a cheap black or dark blue waterproof felt marker. If you carefully present it to the glass, you can rub it a fraction of an inch and rub or file off the high spots- and eventually get a better level.

As an aside to using felt markers, I always have one somewhere near my grinder(s) and hones. You soon know if your tools are blunt or rounded by the bright shiny bits left under the dried ink after grinding/honing. Rumbling on, I use strips of cigarette paper under so called flat surfaces to see if they are flat-or bowed.

It is the little cheap tools. I've got a fancy grinder but I usually stick a bit of cigarette paper on the work with spit and carefully bring the revolving wheel down until the paper is just caught and then flicks away. Heigh ho!
 
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enfieldbullet

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you can also use prussian blue paint which is easy to find at any art store

or mix some rouge from concrete coloring (red variety is red iron oxide, also known as rouge), would just take some oily disperser, enough to make a paste.
 

Tin Falcon

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I made my gibs on my shaper but probably could have used a file if I had to.

The guy has a milling machine presumably with a tilting head.
This is science but not rocket science. And while a perfect gib may require high skill experience IMHO almost anything shop made is going to be better than the original Chinese one.
Tin
 

old-and-broken

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A very good point Tin falcon.

A short session with 400 grit paper on the pressure face of the gib and its mating surface worked wonders for my little machines ease of movement when the screws are tight enough to function as designed.
I would like to do more some day, but so far, that seems to have rendered the movement back and forth on my machine acceptable for my meager needs.
 

albert_chuy

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Hi Albert
"Is it Possible to replace the setscrews with some of those set screws that have a ball bearing in the tip."

Yes a "Loose" ball bearing at the end of the set screws are an improvement I can recommend Looks like I< o >= I being the gib and = being the screw.

The set screw and lock nut is primitive but is very effective been in use for over one hundred years.

The secret of setting up is in the "feel" Use the allen key with the long leg in the screw and tighten it until it is finger tight firm only then hold it firm and tighten the Locknut making sure that the setscrew does not turn.

Checking the adjustment by moving the table with the hand wheel. Repeat this on each screw. It is all in the "Feel" of the tools and hand wheel.

I did a similar project with and X2 mill Drill that made it much more user friendly.

Add a small tip. Use "Cup Point" grub screws for gib adjustment and a "Ball Bearing" that is "Tapping Size" for the Gib Screw I.E 6 mm thread 5 mm ball bearing.

You may have to use a hand drill to tidy up the dimples in the gib as sometimes the finish on some X2 mills.
leaves a lot to be desired.

This leaves dismantle and a tidy up a necessity.

Some users advocate using a brass on bronze gibs.

"Is it Possible to replace that strip of steel with one that has the complete length of the table".

Sorry but I may have not understood properly But would the gib strip the length of the table not prevent it moving at all.

I see you are new to the forum keep asking questions there is masses of information to be gained from much wiser heads than mine.

Enjoy

Eric


Thank you for taking the time to answer back,



Yes you are correct in the current configuration a strip that is the size of the table would completely prevent the table from moving at all, that&#8217;s why I was thinking in using set screws with bearings instead of having the table ride trough and against the gib strip I was thinking I could make the gib strip ride on the bearings instead
 

velocette

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Hi Albert
There seems to be a misunderstanding here!!! <o>

"Yes you are correct in the current configuration a strip that is the size of the table would completely prevent the table from moving at all, that’s why I was thinking in using set screws with bearings instead of having the table ride trough and against the gib strip I was thinking I could make the gib strip ride on the bearings instead">

The gib strip is "Dimpled" to take the ball and hold the gib strip firm with the strip sliding on the dovetails on the table not running on the ball bearings.

The gib strip should ride on a thin film of oil NOT on a small contact point.

Eric
 

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