Mini diesel engine.

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awake

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Looks like it runs very happily on kerosene! I'm going to venture a guess that it would also run just fine on #2 diesel ... and might even run on a range of other oils as well. My dad talks about engines that they had to start on one specific fuel, but then could switch over to just about anything flammable to run. Maybe that would be true for this engine?

In any case, whether it "only" ever runs on kerosene, I am very impressed. The key is that you successfully mastered the pump and injector!
 

minh-thanh

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Looks like it runs very happily on kerosene! I'm going to venture a guess that it would also run just fine on #2 diesel ... and might even run on a range of other oils as well. My dad talks about engines that they had to start on one specific fuel, but then could switch over to just about anything flammable to run. Maybe that would be true for this engine?

In any case, whether it "only" ever runs on kerosene, I am very impressed. The key is that you successfully mastered the pump and injector!

I'm really surprised with how it can run
The way it sprays...
Perhaps , with my little experience and knowledge of engines , including full size and model engines : It really took me by surprise .
The way it runs with kerosene+ether+oil w so I thought it would be fine with only kerosene, so I tried it with kerosene and warmed the cylinder head with a torch for about 10 seconds and : RUN
What I can say: "I can do it and you can too"
Only thing is you are patient enough!?
 
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Mechanicboy

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and warmed the cylinder head with a torch for about 10 seconds and : RUN
How big is the compression ratio in your engine? At higher compression ratio is developing higher temperature.
If the high compression ratio is high enough, then there is the problem of good atomization of the fuel for the engine to be able to start up without heating the cylinder head. By heating the cylinder head, you make the fuel evaporate and ignite more easily at start-up. Injection timing also affects the engine to be able to start easily and without creating engine knocking during normal operation.
 

Thommo

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You might find kero is easier to find in your country than others mate. For example kero is quite expensive over here in Australia as it’s only available in 1 or 2 litre bottles. It used to be available at the bowser in service stations years ago but it’s not used all that much here anymore.
 

Nerd1000

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How big is the compression ratio in your engine? At higher compression ratio is developing higher temperature.
If the high compression ratio is high enough, then there is the problem of good atomization of the fuel for the engine to be able to start up without heating the cylinder head. By heating the cylinder head, you make the fuel evaporate and ignite more easily at start-up. Injection timing also affects the engine to be able to start easily and without creating engine knocking during normal operation.
Pretty much every car or utility sized modern diesel uses some kind of glowplug to aid cold starting, so it's no surprise that minh-thanh's model needs a bit of preheating as well.

Makes me wonder if a normal glow plug from a model aeroplane engine would a work for starting a model diesel.
 
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minh-thanh

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How big is the compression ratio in your engine? At higher compression ratio is developing higher temperature.
If the high compression ratio is high enough, then there is the problem of good atomization of the fuel for the engine to be able to start up without heating the cylinder head. By heating the cylinder head, you make the fuel evaporate and ignite more easily at start-up. Injection timing also affects the engine to be able to start easily and without creating engine knocking during normal operation.
theoretically : about 15 - 1
Increase the compression ratio...I know, but I wasn't planning on using kerosene at first, kerosene was just a way I wanted to find out the engine could be....
 
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minh-thanh

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You might find kero is easier to find in your country than others mate. For example kero is quite expensive over here in Australia as it’s only available in 1 or 2 litre bottles. It used to be available at the bowser in service stations years ago but it’s not used all that much here anymore.
Kerosene Heating Fuel 1 Litre | Sydney Solvents
It costs almost the same as nitro fuel
Is it easier to find than ether anyway, or am I wrong again :D?
I'm not in your country so I don't know

Makes me wonder if a normal glow plug from a model aeroplane engine would a work for starting a model diesel.

I also had the same question
It's used for nitro so I don't know if it's ok with kerosene or diesel
 
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Mechanicboy

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theoretically : about 15 - 1
Increase the compression ratio...I know, but I wasn't planning on using kerosene at first, kerosene was just a way I wanted to find out what the engine could be....
Increase the compression ratio one step up and try until it is able to ignite the fuel of its own heat from compression. Find Hansen diesel engine has a compression ratio of 20: 1 and injection begins at 40-45. You must test how far the engine can inject before TDC without getting an ignition knock. Drops of fuel need time to be heated until it becomes self-igniting and gets full combustion just before TDC.
 

Mechanicboy

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In fact the compression ratio is not same in large , medium and small diesel engine due pressure vs volume is difference in these engines. In the large ship engine compression ratio lower than mediun and small diesel engine.
 

Mechanicboy

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What is the fuel used ? and are you sure ?
See in his website, there is well written about fuel: Kerosene--Petroleum, mixed with 2 % mineral two--stroke oil.

And timing: The system enable the ignition timing to be changed about
15 crankshaft degrees with the lever, injection is set on a between 40-45 degree.
 

Mechanicboy

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Ser at this engine how to set timing..
Sorry I wrote wrong about 40-45 degrees before TDC at Find Hansen's engine, should be between 45 and 55 degrees before TDC. His diesel engine is set at 45 degrees before TDC can set up to 55 degrees, but the lever with excenter at the fuel pump (see at the movie) can be adjusted 15 degrees in the area where it runs best without getting an ignition knock. So you have to try out how big the angle is before TDC it goes best and easy to start up without ether in fuel and heating of the cylinder head.
 

ajoeiam

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Pretty much every full sized modern diesel uses some kind of glowplug to aid cold starting, so it's no surprise that minh-thanh's model needs a bit of preheating as well.

Makes me wonder if a normal glow plug from a model aeroplane engine would a work for starting a model diesel.
Please provide a reference for your assertion.

To my knowledge modern semis don't have any kind of glow plugs.
Now guys that run in northern climes do have coolant heaters but that's a different thing all together!
 

ajoeiam

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How big is the compression ratio in your engine? At higher compression ratio is developing higher temperature.
If the high compression ratio is high enough, then there is the problem of good atomization of the fuel for the engine to be able to start up without heating the cylinder head. By heating the cylinder head, you make the fuel evaporate and ignite more easily at start-up. Injection timing also affects the engine to be able to start easily and without creating engine knocking during normal operation.
I ran a '80 Rabbit diesel for many years and wish I still had it!!!!!!!!!!!
That was 23:1 compression IIRC.
That engine had glow plugs - - - some have intake air heaters. Haven't run the second enough so that I would want to have to choose between.
The higher the compression the higher the economy.
The higher the compression the higher the level of NOx produced.
That's why more modern engines are all getting to some low compression levels (IIRC to 9:1 in fact which is upper end spark ignition country!)..
 

Steamchick

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Pretty much every full sized modern diesel uses some kind of glowplug to aid cold starting, so it's no surprise that minh-thanh's model needs a bit of preheating as well.

Makes me wonder if a normal glow plug from a model aeroplane engine would a work for starting a model diesel.
I reckon it would, as that is the basis of every hot-spot device since blow-lamp heated hot bulbs....
K2
 

Steamchick

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Increase the compression ratio one step up and try until it is able to ignite the fuel of its own heat from compression. Find Hansen diesel engine has a compression ratio of 20: 1 and injection begins at 40-45. You must test how far the engine can inject before TDC without getting an ignition knock. Drops of fuel need time to be heated until it becomes self-igniting and gets full combustion just before TDC.
Let us not forget that Mr Ricardo developed the "pre-combustion chamber, or Indirect injection" to overcome problems of direct injection and associated difficulties.
But modern engines use a common rail at 3 to 5 bar, with piezzo- electric injectors that boost injection pressure many times more than the simple injection pump that Ricardo and Minh-thanh is using...
K2
 

minh-thanh

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Let us not forget that Mr Ricardo developed the "pre-combustion chamber, or Indirect injection" to overcome problems of direct injection and associated difficulties.
.
K2
I was thinking about this too .
Do you know how much more effective it can be ?
 

Nerd1000

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Please provide a reference for your assertion.

To my knowledge modern semis don't have any kind of glow plugs.
Now guys that run in northern climes do have coolant heaters but that's a different thing all together!
I should correct that to 'car and utility size' diesel. I guess large displacement diesels have less need for preheating due to surface area: volume differences.
 

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