Metric Plans for Webster or similar engine

Discussion in 'General Engine Discussion' started by Moper361, Jun 17, 2019.

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  1. Jun 17, 2019 #1

    Moper361

    Moper361

    Moper361

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    Hi all ,

    I've been following this sight with interest for some time now and have keen interest in tackling my first IC engine .I really like the I deal of the Webster engine or similar engine as my first go at creating a running engine .There are some great threads on the Webster with a lot of good information coming from people with experience in building there own websters .
    I have build a couple of steam engines in the past and they have turned out quite well for first builds and even run quite well ,I have made a lot of tooling in my workshop for lathe and mill etc .I have the capabilities for making gears which I have had a play around and seem to be able to manage to get the results I want .I have made a few dummy cam shafts just as trial runs using my mill with the indexing head to machine them with reasonable results also .all of my equipment is set up for metric mainly and here lays a small issue as a lot of the plans on here are imperial .
    I would like to know if anyone out there may have a set of plans in metric for building a Webster or similar engine .I don't mind if the plans are for a slightly larger engine than the original Webster as my machines are on the larger size and more likely suited better for building a slightly larger engine.also my eye sight is not like it used to be and I do struggle at times with smaller items to machine .

    Any help in this area would be greatly appreciated .
    These are some of the items I've made over the years as an idea of were my skill sets at ,I'm still always in the learning area image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg
     
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  2. Jun 17, 2019 #2

    minh-thanh

    minh-thanh

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    Hi Moper361 !
    I have not built the Webster engine, but according to what I know and learn, you can increase or decrease its size. Good compression = run and always RUN !
     
  3. Jun 17, 2019 #3

    Cogsy

    Cogsy

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    I haven't built the Webster but I have built metric engines from imperial plans. It's not hard to convert, mostly just doing the math beforehand. Where there are differences in dimensions (like using 10mm plate instead of 3/8") I just make it clear on the plans before I head out to the shed to remind myself. There's really nothing on the engine which can't be changed to metric quite simply. The Webster is such a good design for a first I.C. I'd suggest you have a go at converting the plans before you give up on it.
     
  4. Jun 17, 2019 #4

    Moper361

    Moper361

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    Thanks Cogsy
    It seems the best way to run with imperial plans like you mention .i was also looking at possibly scaling it up in size slightly and i cant really see any issues with doing this so long as its carefully implicated in conversion .I see your from perth this is my original stomping ground also .Usually when im not away at work i live in chiang mai thailand with my family .I still get down to Perth now and then .Is there any good places to buy machining accessories and tooling as im on the look out for a 4 inch rotary dividing head .I have one now but its a tad large for my mill and tend to run out of height at times so looking for a smaller unit .
    Is there any good places to go have a look in perth .i need dividing plates etc with it ,Planning a trip down in july so would like to have a rumage for one.
     
  5. Jun 17, 2019 #5

    aka9950202

    aka9950202

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    The Webster plans are available in metric. I requested a copy several years ago and built one. I emailed the designer with a request for the metric plans and received them via email the next day.

    I see the website is no longer there. As the plans were offered free, would it be against forum policy to distribute them?

    Cheers,
    Andrew in Melbourne
     
  6. Jun 17, 2019 #6

    Moper361

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  7. Jun 18, 2019 #7

    Cogsy

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    Andrew - as far as I know the Webster plans are in the public domain and should therefore be fine to distribute, but check the actual plan-set and see if there's copyright info before you post please.

    Moper - Hare and Forbes is the only place I know of to get stuff like you're after. They have lots of stock in their Kewdale centre.
     
  8. Jun 19, 2019 #8

    aka9950202

    aka9950202

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    Here are the plans in metric. Delete post if you think it is not in the spirit of the lower left text on the drawing.
     

    Attached Files:

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  9. Jun 19, 2019 #9

    Moper361

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    Veey much appreciated Andrew
    This makes life a bit easier on a first build .thanks again
     
  10. Jun 19, 2019 #10

    Journeyman

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    Don't think it will make it any easier to build. The drawings are not really a metric conversion just a direct conversion of the measurements. A true metric drawing would probably go with 22mm bore x 32mm stroke rather than the 22.23 bore and 31.76mm stroke!
    John
     
  11. Jun 21, 2019 #11

    metalmudler

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    Quite the contrary!
    How many 6.35mm, 7.938mm and 12.7mm reamers do you own? I don't have any and think they would be hard to find! However I do have 1/4" 5/16" and 1/2" reamers ;) Acquiring the required metric drill sizes will also be a pita..
    I feel you could be making it harder on yourself..

    Paul
     
  12. Jun 21, 2019 #12

    Moper361

    Moper361

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    Your Quite right on the reamers and Driils however if you think about it you do have a 6.35mm reamer also a 7.93mm reamer and a 12.7 reamer its just there maked in 1/4 5/16 and 1/2 inch to me the markings would be the only difference .

    As far as machining a part its easier to have the drawing in metric if using metric measuring equipment to produce tbe part rather than bouncing back and forth to a calculator all day . It helps eliminate the the chance of error a little bit thats all.

    Regards Nat
     
  13. Jun 21, 2019 #13

    aka9950202

    aka9950202

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    I agree with not having to do the conversion while building the engine. I did round the numbers to even metric numbers for reamers, drills and hardware. The aim of the exercise is to build an engine. Let us not loose focus and quibble about the details.

    Cheers,

    Andrew in Melbourne
     

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