Making lathe from scratch and using mild steel plate? Why use cast iron?

Discussion in 'Machine Modifications' started by PeterA, Nov 22, 2011.

Help Support HMEM by donating:

  1. Sep 9, 2019 #61

    TSutrina

    TSutrina

    TSutrina

    Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2017
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    1
    The design use to be on www.makeprojects.com concretelathe Which is founded on lathes built during WWI when cast iron was not available. Machinery June 1916 page 877 - 879. Patent 1154155 Yoemans, the stiffness of the design is lowered since the concrete is at the ends supporting the ways which are pipe.

    I suggest looking at the lathes others have built. https://www.vintageprojects.com/lathe-milling-plans.html
    The Turret and Hobby lathe are good choices for starting point. Another site with a concrete Milling machine on the list is:
    http://packratworkshop.com/lib13.htm
     
  2. Sep 9, 2019 #62

    threesixesinarow

    threesixesinarow

    threesixesinarow

    New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2014
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    New England, USA
    What kind of machine?

    On my little, non-model, bed-type mill (and sometimes-lathe) the major parts are just gray cast iron, but it’s really little! Like 4” x 3” x 2” travels, so forces and overhanging distances are very small, and more weight from extra material at weak points isn’t really a problem. That is, I guess, until I want to move it.

    - Clark
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2019
  3. Sep 9, 2019 #63

    john_k

    john_k

    john_k

    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2009
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    1
    Good day,

    I understand that both cast iron and concrete have the desirable attribute of damping out vibration. In the 1970's George Fischer - a Swiss company making state of the art CNC production lathes were using concrete beds to exploit this characteristic. As far as strength vis a vis steel - just make it a bit thicker.
     
  4. Sep 9, 2019 #64

    TSutrina

    TSutrina

    TSutrina

    Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2017
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    1
    I actually covered lathes from hundred Horsepower to down to jeweler's lathes with the web site and patents provided above.

    "I suggest looking at the lathes others have built. https://www.vintageprojects.com/lathe-milling-plans.html
    The Turret and Hobby lathe are good choices for starting point. Another site with a concrete Milling machine on the list is:
    http://packratworkshop.com/lib13.htm "

    I suspect no one looked at the options provided. I opened those sites today. The both the sites list designs of lathes, and milling machine that are bench top and smaller sizes. Concrete is used for a lathe (6 inch turret lathe) on the vintage site and a mill on the packrat site. V. J. Romig design one of each and many others including a 6 inch powered all metal shaper Nov. 1928 Popular Mechanics where Walters turned it into a horizontal mill, and turn the concrete horizontal mill into a shaper. All steel lathes are provided on the vintageproject site. These all come from magazines like Popular Science and Mechanics. I have found that these magazines published shapers also, both hand and powered. April 1959 Popular Mechanics has a small bolt together lathe from bar stock. "A metal turning lathe for Model makers" by W. R. Bell is from an earlier article, all metal, article is yellowed. "Hand shaper for your shop" by S. S. Miller in Oct 1955 didn't have the magazine at the bottom.
     
  5. Sep 10, 2019 #65

    SmithDoor

    SmithDoor

    SmithDoor

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2009
    Messages:
    295
    Likes Received:
    40
    I have used concrete in round Mill tube .
    It works great for milling steel on lite weight Mill.

    I have posted in photos in the down section

    Dave

     
  6. Sep 21, 2019 at 6:11 PM #66

    jackary

    jackary

    jackary

    Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2008
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0

Share This Page