Looking for shaper article reprint put of 1953 Popular Mechanics or similar magazine. Previously found it on this website and downloaded and my lustri

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bobs7-62steamair

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Need to find this article on Shaper Machining 1953 reprint or thereabouts from popular something magazine. Great article and would like to recover it for printing. Any help appreciated.
Regards.
Bob E.
 

bikr7549

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All Popular Mechanics issues are available for free on Google Books. There is no index or search mechanism that I have found so far, but they are arranged by year. Fun to look at, but be prepared to spend a lot of time there, lots of fun things to read.
Bob

 

SmithDoor

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I found Popular Mechanics was great until the 1970's.
After that the it was down hill.

Dave

All Popular Mechanics issues are available for free on Google Books. There is no index or search mechanism that I have found so far, but they are arranged by year. Fun to look at, but be prepared to spend a lot of time there, lots of fun things to read.
Bob

 

packrat

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Quote "
I found Popular Mechanics was great until the 1970's.
After that it was down hill."

I was given a one year subscription to Popular Mechanics a year or so ago, and your right it has gone way down hill. :confused:
 

ajoeiam

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Today we can use a hydraulic ram over the old gear ram.

Dave
Using hydraulics greatly increases the energy inefficiency of the design.

Excellent hydraulics do not remain such - - - - wear on hydraulics systems seems to be much higher, on a per hour basis, in my experience, than in well developed thought out gear systems.
 

SmithDoor

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The last of manufacturer shapers used hydraulic.

If I was building I would use under 1,000 psi hydraulic pressure. The higher pressure has greater wear over low pressure.

I have look at adding a shaper to a bench mill. Most work is done just adding a ram 🐏.

Dave

Using hydraulics greatly increases the energy inefficiency of the design.

Excellent hydraulics do not remain such - - - - wear on hydraulics systems seems to be much higher, on a per hour basis, in my experience, than in well developed thought out gear systems.
 

SmithDoor

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Looks great👍.

What like about a shaper is making internal gears.
Most other jobs a mill will do a great job.

Dave

I PM’d the OP without a reply, so I’ll post the article I have here. Not sure if this is what he was looking for, here’s one I downloaded years ago for my reference to cover my Atlas 7B. Might be of interest to others on this thread.
 

a41capt

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Looks great👍.

What like about a shaper is making internal gears.
Most other jobs a mill will do a great job.

Dave
Agreed, but my mill tooling is real expensive where my shaper tooling is pennies, and it’s so satisfying watching and listening to my shaper working! Seeing those blue chips flying off and listening to that “swish, swish, swish” is damn hypnotic! Don’t get me wrong, I’ll never part with my mill, but my old 7B cuts internal splines, keyways, and internal ring gears where my poor old mill would just sit there and shake its head, and with a finish grind on the tool steel, the finish is amazing. ;)

John W
 

SmithDoor

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The last time I had a shaper was around 1970 it weight was 2 tons no fun to use.
Next had a shaper for Bridgeport till 1990's.

Now looking at add shaper to my bench mill. Something like 3" (75mm) shoke.
I have hydraulic pump and value.
This is space saver as hobby shop is only 100 sqft. It is cool and as long running tools it heated too.

Dave

Agreed, but my mill tooling is real expensive where my shaper tooling is pennies, and it’s so satisfying watching and listening to my shaper working! Seeing those blue chips flying off and listening to that “swish, swish, swish” is damn hypnotic! Don’t get me wrong, I’ll never part with my mill, but my old 7B cuts internal splines, keyways, and internal ring gears where my poor old mill would just sit there and shake its head, and with a finish grind on the tool steel, the finish is amazing. ;)

John W
 

wazrus

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I have a shaper which I rescued from landfill about 40 years ago. It's a pretty big lump of iron, unbranded, probably one of those WW2 quickies. it will capably 'shape' a 12" cube. It is gear driven, by a 2HP single-phase motor, driving through a very much adapted motor cycle gearbox. Final drive by a matched pair of 'A' section V-belts. The drive works well. I like the 'swish, swish, swish' from John. Mine has more of a 'clunk. clunk, grind, grind' action! I think it'd weigh about 3/4 of a ton. It came with a very good 10" vice, which is used for all sorts of things. It'll do what my mill won't and its stroke is about 18".
 

wazrus

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Yes, it's a bit of a monster. It has a floor footprint of about 5-0" by 2'-6". When first I acquired it, there was an enormous 3-phase (415v) motor attached, driving through a flat belt countershaft, all mounted on a sort of separate steel 'skid' if that's a good term. Anyway, the 'skid' thingo brought the floor footprint out to about 7'-0" long, by about 3'-0" wide. Just a tad cumbersome in my workshop. A little upside was the weight of solid copper in the motor, if I recall it was around 50Kg. and paid for a few of the renovations. The machine is covered in crap as it is seldom used these days, but is a good conversation piece.
 

cds4byu

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I have had this hand shaper article from October 1955 for a while now. I intended to build it, but never have.

Carl
 

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a41capt

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I have had this hand shaper article from October 1955 for a while now. I intended to build it, but never have.

Carl
If you added an appropriate crankshaft to the plans, you could motorized that pretty easily. It’d take some fiddling around and reviewing some other small shapers to figure out how to do it, but a powered cross feed would be doable as well.

Of course, it’d probably be more cost efficient (in time) to just go buy a small Atlas or South Bend shaper!;)

John W
 

Jones

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The main thing I've used my little 10" shaper for is just flattening large surfaces

 

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