Looking for a old light bulb

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RM-MN

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I have had the same problem for years. I bought a very brite shop lite with 3 500 watt bulbs for good lighting. Of course, that is all heat which in the winter is fine but in the summer is awful. Worse yet, (not to speak of the high electric bill) was the f-ing bulbs burned out shortly and they were very expensive to replace. Finally I got down to just one bulb which I used for a while before IT burned out. Then I bought one at a time to replace them and finally the LEDs came into their own and I bought one of them for directly over my lathe. There is still a little bit of shadow when a tool is in the way, but it's way better than before and not all that heat and high bills. I have three of them now and very goo lighting where I needs it.
You need to spend a big chunk of money and get rid of that shadow.

Put the light right where you want it.
 

skyline1

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A theatrical lighting supplier might be able to help.

IIRC Some small projector lamps were 60 Volt

Stage gear sometimes uses very odd voltages and they will have contact with (and catalogues for) the big lighting suppliers (Thorn, GE, Mazda, etc) they can probably get one for you even if they don't carry them in stock.

That being said a lot of theatre lighting is LED now, all of mine is. (I run a a community P.A. and lighting service)
LEDs last longer, use far less power, make less heat and are ideal for harsh environments like a machine shop. (No glass to break if a lump of metal hits them and no filament to break with vibration)

The flicker problem present in early LEDs has now been largely overcome as previous posts have mentioned. It may be worth noting that fluorescent lights also have this problem and old worn ones especially have been known to cause migraine headaches or even epilepsy in sensitive people.

Fluorescents can also cause a strobing effect which makes rotating objects appear stationary at certain speeds (Very Dangerous !)

Best Regards Mark
 
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RM-MN

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The flicker problem present in early LEDs has now been largely overcome as previous posts have mentioned. It may be worth noting that fluorescent lights also have this problem and old worn ones especially have been known to cause migraine headaches or even epilepsy in sensitive people.
If I have had sufficient sleep even new fluorescent lights flicker badly.
 

Richard Hed

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If I have had sufficient sleep even new fluorescent lights flicker badly.
Flourescents gave me headaches and eyeaches. Have gotten rid of them. But to over come the flourescent problem, I would put incandescent bulbs with them. My biggest problem with flourescent is that they pretend to last for 20,000 hrs but I doubt that they actually lasted more than 7,000.
 

SmithDoor

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flourescent light have life from 6,000 to 40,000 hours.
If can find the data on your flourescent light it tell how long but your power can shorten the life. The CFL is short and data is not true. I have switch my CFL to LED type. But still use 48" flourescent for main parts .

Dave

Flourescents gave me headaches and eyeaches. Have gotten rid of them. But to over come the flourescent problem, I would put incandescent bulbs with them. My biggest problem with flourescent is that they pretend to last for 20,000 hrs but I doubt that they actually lasted more than 7,000.
 

mcostello

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Switched the whole house over to Leds. Instant on which is great. Power usage is 18% less. Spent $140, saving $15 a month appx. 1 year in to this. Got a bargain on the bulbs $3.00 each.
 

bluejets

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Switched the whole house over to Leds. Instant on which is great. Power usage is 18% less. Spent $140, saving $15 a month appx. 1 year in to this. Got a bargain on the bulbs $3.00 each.
Think you need to recalculate that........$15.00 representing 18% .......that's a lot of Kwh per month just on lights, even at the Aussie rate of 20c a unit.
 

Cogsy

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Think you need to recalculate that........$15.00 representing 18% .......that's a lot of Kwh per month just on lights, even at the Aussie rate of 20c a unit.
You must live on the east coast - I pay about 29c a unit over here :(
 

skyline1

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Estimates vary but LED Bulbs generally use around 10% of the power of their Incandescent counterparts for the same light output. In domestic situations the savings are impressive but imagine the savings in a big stage lighting rig.

I can run my entire LED lighting rig from a 4KVA Generator that I can put in the back of the van along with the entire lighting setup. If I was using Incandescents I would need more like 40KVA. That is a whole different game, A trailer drawn generator costing in excess of £10,000 pounds, much thicker, bulkier and more expensive cables and several beefy roadies to set it up.

Whilst my rig is quite modest by theatrical standards LED lighting makes the difference between a simple, portable, one man operation and a major undertaking.
Plus of course a huge saving in fuel costs.

Another major bonus in stage use is not having to search through mountains of filter gels to find the right colour and then climb up ladders to fit them. I just do it remotely at the lighting desk.

Best Regards Mark
 

Ken I

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Those 50V / 60V lights have their origins in the safety regulations - most regulations classify <50V as safe and therefore unregulated.

Below 50V you can string naked wires and still be legal. (depends on current regulations - no pun intended.)

So things like Pinball machines were built with 24V (Gottlieb) or 50V (Williams) electrics. Open circuit voltage on welding transformers was kept to below 50V for the same reason.

A lot of shipping uses some strange voltages (particularly older ships) and you can get odd values from those electrical suppliers to the marine trade.

I believe that a lot of Russian vessels use 60V - the old school Russian military did not use anything standard so the enemy would be unable to use captured stores - they made everything odd sizes (ballbearing, fuzes, coil voltages etc. etc.) such that captured stores would fit Russian equipment but not vice versa.

Unfortunately if you were a civilian manufacturer you pretty much had to do the same thing because of availability issues.

My advice would be to never buy anything of Russian origin unless you have ascertained that it uses standard sizes.

I have had the unfortunate experience of having to cope with Russian marine and industrial equipment - it was to say the least frustrating.

Regards, Ken
 

skyline1

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I forgot about marine equipment thanks for reminding us Ken, so if a theatrical lighting supplier can't help a marine one might.

Where I used to work we supplied a lot of electrical equipment to the British Royal Navy and they too had some really odd requirements often with different parts of a vessel using different supply voltages and frequencies (and a fair amount of D.C. stuff) depending on the function of that particular department. RADAR for example (IIRC) used a lot of 400Hz supplies I can't remember exactly why.

One of the oddest ones however was for civilian use on power supplies for a large I.T. system. This used multiple electronically controlled generators which could be brought online in sequence or taken off according to load and isolated for maintenance.

This used a very oddball voltage but what was really strange was it's frequency exactly 440Hz This will be familiar to musicians as it is Middle A on a piano and a musical standard. According to the designer (ever curious I had to ask !) this was so that in an emergency should the electronics fail the generators could be synced and brought on line using nothing more than a tuning fork.

Talk about the machine being "on song" these were, literally !

Best Regards Mark
 

SmithDoor

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Note: NEC notes any voltage under 70 volts is low voltage. It also same voltage used for telephone ring .

Dave
 

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