Looking for a old light bulb

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Rudirk

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Good morning,
I’m looking for a old light bulb for my milling mashine. It have 60 volt .
Do someone know where I could buy this ?
88F30866-BDC2-420E-8B70-CEBDE023E0FD.jpeg
 

Wizard69

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All I can do is wish you lots of luck. Finding filament based light bulbs has become a huge chore. We have a lot of comparators and other old optical equipment and have to search hard to find old bulbs these days at work. Frankly the quality isn't as good as it use to be either.

You will likely hate to hear this but I'd seriously consider a lighting upgrade. What you find today for an old bulb you might not find in 5 months. I've literally have had to design new lighting systems at work, for some of the tooling, as bulbs have become a huge issue. Sadly a lot of the LED solutions do not inspire confidence that they will be around a few years from now. Incandescent bulbs are like the steam engine of old except that rebuilding a light bulb isn't something that likely will happen.
 

lennardhme

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Hi,
incandescent bulbs are available in Australia.
In the interest of saving the planet, our Govt. offered to change them to leds n/c. An offer which I unfortunately took up.
Only a personal thing & many wont agree, but I find leds throw shadows & are rather harsh. In my workshop particularly I found my eyes were getting a bit strained & my close vision very definately suffering.
My solution was to put solar panels to supply workshop power via an invertor & as power now costs nothing, replaced the leds back to incandescent globes.
My eyesight has improved dramatically & well on the way back to being normal. My optometrist is pleased with the change & so am I.
Only my experience for what its worth.
Cheers,
Lennard.
 

Ivan Winters

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I live in Bradford West Yorks UK. One trick I have found is that whenever an attempt is made by the authorities to 'outlaw' something the local Pakistani stores will buy up clearance stocks of the old items. Plenty of local Pakistani run D-I-Y stores stock wide ranges of incandescent bulbs in various wattages at very reasonable prices.
 

RDFMTS2

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Hi,
incandescent bulbs are available in Australia.
In the interest of saving the planet, our Govt. offered to change them to leds n/c. An offer which I unfortunately took up.
Only a personal thing & many wont agree, but I find leds throw shadows & are rather harsh. In my workshop particularly I found my eyes were getting a bit strained & my close vision very definately suffering.
My solution was to put solar panels to supply workshop power via an invertor & as power now costs nothing, replaced the leds back to incandescent globes.
My eyesight has improved dramatically & well on the way back to being normal. My optometrist is pleased with the change & so am I.
Only my experience for what its worth.
Cheers,
Lennard.
Hi Lennard. It maybe that the lamps they were supplying 'no/charge' are old stock ones which were half the frequency of a filament lamp, I.E. 25 hertz instead of 50 Hertz, as the early LED lamps used half wave rectification. More modern designed ones run at typically 400 Hertz and so the flickering is not then noticeable to the human eye due to persistence of vision. Also the hot filament of a conventional lamp running at 50 Hertz, does not cool enough to between cycles for the flicker to be noticeable, where as, an LED can easily switch on and off at a faster rate than that. To deal with the shadow issue, an LED panel or panels, typically 600mm square will give a more defused light for general illumination, then use a smaller LED lamp as a point source task light. There are also differing colour temperatures of LED lamps, I.E. cold white (6500 degrees), white (about 4000 degrees), and what may be best for you warm white (2700 degrees). I hope this helps. David
 

Tim1974

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I’ve been struggling at work since the leds went in too haveing trouble driving at night hmm interesting
 

terryd

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I Like led lamps and have replaced all incandescent and fluorescent lamps as they fail with leds. I use a range of cold white and warm white depending on the application e.g. over my work desk I use bright white which are close to daylight which helps when painting or writing while for most purposes I use warm white which is more relaxing. I must admit that I haven't experienced any problems with my sight, nor has my wife who is quite sensitive to such things usually.

As an aside, I have solar panels for my household generation which is great int the daytime and I thought of a battery storage system for evening use (mostly illumination and some to drive my heat pump in winter), but when I looked at the current price I worked out that it would take years to recover the cost in any savings.

Just my own experiences.

TerryD
 

OrangeAlpine

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I found that my eyes are sensitive to light color. Love 5000 K, 6000 K is a bit harsh. Also the solution to having an LED blasting your eyes is to install a bank of them. Soon the room is filled with beautiful 5000K light and the single source blasting effect is gone. As long as I have 80 y.o. eyes, there is no way I'd go back to dim yellow light incandescent.
Bill
 

almega

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I too like the LEDs, espcially in the warmer colors. I have switched out all house lighting and my shop lighting. As OrangeAlpine says, once you have all switched and you have a flood of lighting, there is no shadow effect and it is pleasant on the eyes. I even modified a string of mirror lamps and installed under my mill head to provide shadow free lighting to the mill table and I really like that.
 

Cogsy

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I even modified a string of mirror lamps and installed under my mill head to provide shadow free lighting to the mill table and I really like that.
I did the same a few years back and they went out on me a few weeks ago. I ripped them down to replace them before I found out it was the power supply that had gone bad and I haven't got back to repairing it yet. The mill sure is dark now when I'm trying to hit my marks.
 

SmithDoor

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I would change to 12 volt and use 12 volt transformer.
You just use a low cost battery charger from Harbor freight. Bulb from the Auto supplier like Walmart.
I have used RadioShack but not here more .
I do use Jameco Electronics - Electronic Components Distributor since 1980's .
They most parts electronic you ever need .

Dave

I did the same a few years back and they went out on me a few weeks ago. I ripped them down to replace them before I found out it was the power supply that had gone bad and I haven't got back to repairing it yet. The mill sure is dark now when I'm trying to hit my marks.
 

SmithDoor

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There also 32 volt bulbs too.
The bulbs was used in homes with out the power company up to 1930 on larger batteries using a small gas generator.
The good news the odd voltage bulbs use same socket as 120 volt bulbs or some cases automotive sockets.
At one time may still use 24 bulbs in big trucks.

My self I change to 12 volt automotive or LED so I get replacements.

Dave
 
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petertha

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Not sure if this helps but I found inexpensive LED replacements for my '97 vintage Taiwan lathe panel lights. The trick is to find the original (assume incandescent) model number & sometimes that comes up as 'replacement' in the LED description.
 

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grahamgollar

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Although conventional filament lamps have been ostracised they are still available in a "Rough Service" version 100% interchangeable
 

terryd

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60 volt or 60W...?
Hi Blue,

Probably 60V as machine lighting was traditionally run from a drop-down transformer for safety reasons as the lamp is quite close to the operator when compared to domestic lighting. When I taught shop here in the Uk all of the machine lights were 50V. I now use LEDs

TerryD
 

Richard Hed

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I have had the same problem for years. I bought a very brite shop lite with 3 500 watt bulbs for good lighting. Of course, that is all heat which in the winter is fine but in the summer is awful. Worse yet, (not to speak of the high electric bill) was the f-ing bulbs burned out shortly and they were very expensive to replace. Finally I got down to just one bulb which I used for a while before IT burned out. Then I bought one at a time to replace them and finally the LEDs came into their own and I bought one of them for directly over my lathe. There is still a little bit of shadow when a tool is in the way, but it's way better than before and not all that heat and high bills. I have three of them now and very goo lighting where I needs it.
 
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