Loctite Question

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davidyat

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I've come across so many blogs and threads where the machinists say they use Loctite (insert number here) for a particular assembly of their project. With so many Loctite products and numbers, are there any places where I can go to or download from with a concise explanation of what to use for a particular assembly? For example, when pressing brass into steel, use Loctite X, when pressing steel into aluminum, use Loctite Y and so on. Thanks in advance.
Grasshopper
 

ShopShoe

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More than you probably wanted to know:


Realistically, the industrial suppliers list the properties of the individual loctite products they stock and sell, or most of them will answer a query regarding a specific problem and solution.

--ShopShoe
 

davidyat

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Thanks Shop Shoe. I was hoping to find a page with solutions where I don't have to wade through hundreds of pages just to find my answer. Something like my one page of fractions and decimals. When I want to tap a hole, they tell me what drill to use. Something simple like that. Something where I can print one or two pages and laminate them. Want to fuse steel to aluminum, use this. Want to fuse brass to steel, use this.
Grasshopper
 

BaronJ

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Hi Guys,

I've been through this with one of the Henkel representatives. They do have many solutions for affixing different metals to each other, most of them developed for particular industrial applications.

I actually got given a plastic suitcase with a number of Henkel products in it to sample and try. Among the samples was a tube of "Gap Filling" super glue ! It was suggested that I try that and the ordinary thin stuff. Which I did.

So today I tend to use the thin super glue more than anything else, though I do have bottles of green 276 and red ! I can't read the number on the label any more, so that one has had a lot of use.

I do have a picture of the sample case and its contents but I can't find it at the moment.
 

Charles Lamont

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Talking just about anaerobic retaining compounds, I stick (ha!) with the more popular grades that are available in 10ml bottles:
High strength retainer, for gears on shafts, built-up crankshafts etc: 603 or 638,
Medium strength 'bearing fit', that can be disassembled: 641,
Low strength 'screw lock' for smaller sizes: 221,
High temperature, for cylinder liners and valve cages, for example: 648.
I also have a spray can of 7063 cleaner, but don't use it much.
 

Robsmith

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Many years ago I had a quick reference chart ( supplied by Loctite) that provided exactly what davidyat is after. I'm sure that if you contact them they should be able to help.
 

davidyat

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Mr. Brainbridge, pages 20, 21 and 22 of the PDF file are just what I was looking for. Thanks.
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SmithDoor

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Were use loctite is on ball bearings and bolts
I only use if there is a lot of vibration.
It can be a pain to remove later.

Dave

I've come across so many blogs and threads where the machinists say they use Loctite (insert number here) for a particular assembly of their project. With so many Loctite products and numbers, are there any places where I can go to or download from with a concise explanation of what to use for a particular assembly? For example, when pressing brass into steel, use Loctite X, when pressing steel into aluminum, use Loctite Y and so on. Thanks in advance.
Grasshopper
 

wazrus

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My encounters with cyanoacrylate 'adhesives' haven't been very successful. In fact I have NO faith in them whatever. But there's one constant: they WILL fail, usually at a most inconvenient or expensive moment. A stressed CA jojnt is failure waiting to happen. I cite my 'good' Honda 13HP mower engine, which, I suspect, used CA as a 'fit' for the main bearings. The crankshaft was flapping around like Aunt Maud's knickers and the engine shook itself apart, at the crankcase joint. I didn't really need to measure the 'fit' clearance, it was all too obvious: a new bearing showed the same knicker flap. Remetalling the crank was a solution, but then, a new chonda engine was cheaper. Anybody want some Honda parts?
 

MRA

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Perhaps a tangent - but at the industrial museum where I volunteer, we have piles (and piles) of Loctite products which have been donated as having exceeded their 'best before' date, by industry. I can see why NASA or BAe might be strict about this; but in the shed at home I am using little red bottles scrounged from Ferranti's by someone long-dead who retired more than 30 years ago. They still seem to work!
cheers
Mark
 

L98fiero

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My encounters with cyanoacrylate 'adhesives' haven't been very successful. In fact I have NO faith in them whatever. But there's one constant: they WILL fail, usually at a most inconvenient or expensive moment. A stressed CA jojnt is failure waiting to happen. I cite my 'good' Honda 13HP mower engine, which, I suspect, used CA as a 'fit' for the main bearings. The crankshaft was flapping around like Aunt Maud's knickers and the engine shook itself apart, at the crankcase joint. I didn't really need to measure the 'fit' clearance, it was all too obvious: a new bearing showed the same knicker flap. Remetalling the crank was a solution, but then, a new chonda engine was cheaper. Anybody want some Honda parts?
With proper surface prep, even washing parts with acetone, and of course proper fit up of the mating parts, the cyanoacrylate adhesives won't fail, if the main bearings were 'fit' with adhesives that was just bad engineering, surprising for Honda.
 

ajoeiam

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With proper surface prep, even washing parts with acetone, and of course proper fit up of the mating parts, the cyanoacrylate adhesives won't fail, if the main bearings were 'fit' with adhesives that was just bad engineering, surprising for Honda.
Likely not Honda (Japan) - - - - - probably a chinese knockoff (I think that's why it was called 'chonda' parts.

One can get great stuff out of China - - - - but I think you not only have to look for it - - - you have to ask for it.
Likely not the cheapest stuff then either!!

(China lost the lowest wage battle quite a number of years ago. IIRC Mexico is presently in the lead or contending.)
 

awake

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My encounters with cyanoacrylate 'adhesives' haven't been very successful. In fact I have NO faith in them whatever. But there's one constant: they WILL fail, usually at a most inconvenient or expensive moment. A stressed CA jojnt is failure waiting to happen. I cite my 'good' Honda 13HP mower engine, which, I suspect, used CA as a 'fit' for the main bearings. The crankshaft was flapping around like Aunt Maud's knickers and the engine shook itself apart, at the crankcase joint. I didn't really need to measure the 'fit' clearance, it was all too obvious: a new bearing showed the same knicker flap. Remetalling the crank was a solution, but then, a new chonda engine was cheaper. Anybody want some Honda parts?
Sure, drop them in the mail to me. (Shouldn't cost more than a couple of dollars to mail ... right? :)
 

Bentwings

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I've come across so many blogs and threads where the machinists say they use Loctite (insert number here) for a particular assembly of their project. With so many Loctite products and numbers, are there any places where I can go to or download from with a concise explanation of what to use for a particular assembly? For example, when pressing brass into steel, use Loctite X, when pressing steel into aluminum, use Loctite Y and so on. Thanks in advance.
Grasshopper
What I do here is look up the loc tote contact snd get their recommendation I don’t just go snd assembly things with it without hood reason you can get things stuck together too well snd not well enough. The same with adhesives or lubricants. Having worked in R&D and development of products the mfg wants you satisfied their product will work for your application. They’ve tried many scenarios to get up Timmy results. So tech service is a mainstay.
Byron
 

wazrus

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The engine was indeed a genuine Honda and its replacement was and still is, a chonda. The thing keeps on keeping on. The chonda, that is. The chonda is now about ten years old. I, too was surprised to see the Honda pretty much disintegrate in front of me. That sort of thing shouldn't happen with a Honda. But having said all that, I do contend that ride-on mower designs vastly overload the engine bearings, in that most have a very large overhung bearing load, as the main drive pulley is often on an extension of the engine shaft. In the case of the Honda mower, the extension is about 6 inches long. A truly crappy piece of engineering, but fairly typical, so I've seen. Note that this is a Honda (branded) mower with a Honda 13HP engine. It is over 20 years old, but still a goer and its Sundstrand transmission keeps surprising.
 
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