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ajoeiam

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No, we doesn't need a more generic thread. But what is a "snap"? A lot of terms are unfamiliar to me and so to a lot of others.

As long as no-one is whining about what someone is saying on this thread, then no need for "more general"
The computer universe is more than peppered with unusual terms, many preempted from other fields, and acronyms - - - - - mountains of them.

Now if only they could be convinced to write out the acronym once - - - life would be good - - - - but everyone is assumed to know ALL of the terms and acronyms - - - I don't (plaintive wail!!)
 
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Acronyms can be fun! Westinghouse Defense (RIP) had a review system created by the pointy haired bosses called Performance Management System. Yup, PMS. They then doubled down by thinking that there was a single methodology for sorting out all production problems. Failure Analysis Review Team. Big hoot in the days of Quality Circle Jerks and Totaled Quality Management. You could be blamed by FART, marked down in PMS for saying quality is built in, not smeared on by management after the fact, sentenced to be in a Quality Circle Jerk for re-education, then see quality totaled. Can't beat that hot mess except for page one in the workmanship standards handbook that read "This page intentionally left blank". Wonder how they ended up with massive layoffs and were acquired by a less clueless outfit? The 80's were the decade of trendy failure most certainly. Won't even go too far into the weird side of the world, where some poor sap was the Deputy Intelligence Logistics Duty Officer...

Cheers,
Stan
 

SmithDoor

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The biggest advantage is not to many nuts are using Linux.
Technology on any computer any can get a virus as soon start down loading. Even a photo can have a virus.
But nuts do not how do this part and the nut keep to simpler ways.

The way we stop virus is start the modem. All the smart home devices need to have the modem less safe to work.
My self I do not have any smart devices on my internet for that reason.

Next is the operating system can stop virus the latest is safer.

The last line of defense in a good virus software.

Remember the nuts are not looking for someone looking at engines and machine tools there just no money there.
The looking for someone spend money on gaming using credit cards.
The nuts not to interest in a Walmart shoppers just no real money.

Dave

My understanding is tht Linux is almost impossible to get a virus anyway. Is that still true?
 

aarggh

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I think Gentoo as painful as it was years back, to me made more sense when PC resources were expensive and underpowered, thus tailoring the OS to get the most grunt and least package overhead, now the crappiest machine available could easily run any distro for multi tenanted websites, databases, voice, etc without any trouble. I see a lot of vendors using Gentoo style cut-down systems, some work beautifully, some are a nightmare when there's an issue requiring package updates because of the particular uniqueness of the build.

There's a lot to be said for the genericness and reliability of distros like Centos, Ubunut, etc, making it far easier for non technical people to install and manage them.

And once you get used to working with Linux, it's an amazingly powerful system, with incredibly useful commands available.
 

ajoeiam

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The biggest advantage is not to many nuts are using Linux.
Technology on any computer any can get a virus as soon start down loading. Even a photo can have a virus.
But nuts do not how do this part and the nut keep to simpler ways.

The way we stop virus is start the modem. All the smart home devices need to have the modem less safe to work.
My self I do not have any smart devices on my internet for that reason.

Next is the operating system can stop virus the latest is safer.

The last line of defense in a good virus software.

Remember the nuts are not looking for someone looking at engines and machine tools there just no money there.
The looking for someone spend money on gaming using credit cards.
The nuts not to interest in a Walmart shoppers just no real money.

Dave

I was told that an unprotected windows machine was compromised in under 60 seconds after being opened on the web.
Knew these guys and they did it as an experiment.
I was already running linux at the time really didn't provide any impetus to change.
As I tend to say when pushed - - - "I decline to accept M$'s security opportunities."

Am finding it interesting how M$ is now embracing linux - - - still have a hard time trusting them though!!!
 

awake

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There are some viruses targeting Linux these days. As I understand it, they are particularly focused on Linux servers (ransomware), but of course can be "caught" by anyone who does not practice safe computing.
 

SmithDoor

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That true if you very unlucky
But today it may take a long time.
The best to keep safe is backup your data on disks and on the cloud. And use virus protection programs too.

If get a virus then reformat and use your backup to restore your computer 🖥. But that can happen if your hard drive dies too.

Dave

I was told that an unprotected windows machine was compromised in under 60 seconds after being opened on the web.
Knew these guys and they did it as an experiment.
I was already running linux at the time really didn't provide any impetus to change.
As I tend to say when pushed - - - "I decline to accept M$'s security opportunities."

Am finding it interesting how M$ is now embracing linux - - - still have a hard time trusting them though!!!
 
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Acronyms can be fun! Westinghouse Defense (RIP) had a review system created by the pointy haired bosses called Performance Management System. Yup, PMS. They then doubled down by thinking that there was a single methodology for sorting out all production problems. Failure Analysis Review Team. Big hoot in the days of Quality Circle Jerks and Totaled Quality Management. You could be blamed by FART, marked down in PMS for saying quality is built in, not smeared on by management after the fact, sentenced to be in a Quality Circle Jerk for re-education, then see quality totaled. Can't beat that hot mess except for page one in the workmanship standards handbook that read "This page intentionally left blank". Wonder how they ended up with massive layoffs and were acquired by a less clueless outfit? The 80's were the decade of trendy failure most certainly. Won't even go too far into the weird side of the world, where some poor sap was the Deputy Intelligence Logistics Duty Officer...

Cheers,
Stan
I heard of someone who was described as the Senior Health Information Trainer....
K2
 
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Hi all,
After many attempts - following different instructions etc. from web searches, I finally managed to get some sort of Linux installed on my old Dell 32-bit PC. IT WORKS.
But I still have to learn a few things, while I am in "trial mode"... and still have Windows on the PC. some "stupid" questions - because I don't know any better, but I am sure you'll help.
  • How do I find somewhere in settings (or whatever) to tell Linux how to see my box so it can connect to the internet?
  • How do I tell Linux how to "see" my existing folders of files that are on Windows? - I don't have room on the drive to copy all the Windows "My Documents" and paste them into "linux documents" etc.
  • Do I need to plug-in my Back-up Terabyte hard drive to do Linux back-ups: when I eventually have just Linux installed? - I am pretty sure I shall have to delete Windows XP so there is room for Linux. Linux is nearly 8 Gb, and I have less than that spare with Windows on the drive.
  • What should I do with the Windows folders? If I just delete them, there is no return. But if I simply cut and paste onto another removable drive, will they work if I re-fit them onto the PC later? - I guess not, as the Windows operating system won't be there to open in a way that I can rstore Windows anyway...?
That's all the stupid questions - for now. I am sure I'll bother you again.
Thanks Guys n Gals: (However you like to be known in this modern world?)
K2
 

ajoeiam

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Hi all,
After many attempts - following different instructions etc. from web searches, I finally managed to get some sort of Linux installed on my old Dell 32-bit PC. IT WORKS.
But I still have to learn a few things, while I am in "trial mode"... and still have Windows on the PC. some "stupid" questions - because I don't know any better, but I am sure you'll help.
  • How do I find somewhere in settings (or whatever) to tell Linux how to see my box so it can connect to the internet?
  • How do I tell Linux how to "see" my existing folders of files that are on Windows? - I don't have room on the drive to copy all the Windows "My Documents" and paste them into "linux documents" etc.
  • Do I need to plug-in my Back-up Terabyte hard drive to do Linux back-ups: when I eventually have just Linux installed? - I am pretty sure I shall have to delete Windows XP so there is room for Linux. Linux is nearly 8 Gb, and I have less than that spare with Windows on the drive.
  • What should I do with the Windows folders? If I just delete them, there is no return. But if I simply cut and paste onto another removable drive, will they work if I re-fit them onto the PC later? - I guess not, as the Windows operating system won't be there to open in a way that I can rstore Windows anyway...?
That's all the stupid questions - for now. I am sure I'll bother you again.
Thanks Guys n Gals: (However you like to be known in this modern world?)
K2

Well - - - no bloody expert here but I'll throw in my $0.005 worth (lots of inflation lately!!!! (and I'm not worth that much!!!)).

1. Dunno why you would install a 32bit version of anything today.
My first system I ran linux on, built in 1999, well I ran 64 bit linux on that one. You need 64 bit before you can use hard drives bigger than 2 GB.
2. Normally in your install, you haven't mentioned which variant and which version of such you used, your internet access is developed.
So - - please - - - what did you install?
3. I haven't run a dual boot system in a very long time but maybe, see #2 - - - more info is needed, I think its possible to mount a M$ partition.
Not going looking for info until #2 is completed.
4. There is no info on the system. If using 8GB of space is scaring you then maybe you just don't have enough HDD space to do much useful.
Please post your system data.
5. If you copy files from a M$ folder onto a storage drive and then later copy them back - - - they should work! I would check for corruption by
opening the files in question from the storage disk before you assume you have a successful transfer.

Please - - - - one of the first things hammered at one when you ask for assistance is - - - you need to provide info on your project - - - first.
Its ever so much easier to provide help if one has some idea what is being talked about.
 
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Sorry AJ: I'll have to finish removing loads of data files from the "win" set-up before I can get back to the Linux and see what the software is called. When I tried to install the Linux software I had "clicked" on the Linux website (a bit of a guess as to what I was selecting) LINUX told me that it wasn't suitable (out-of-date) and said it would install ##@::;'# instead. Which worked! And the name was something conjured up by someone who only spoke "computer", so not a name I could remember.
But when I switch off, re-set and load up Linux from the USB again I'll be able to get the name of the software. No rush, I'm having a couple of weeks holiday soon and this has taken a year to get this far. So many Interweb sets of instructions didn't do anything for me, this is a vast subject and one that probably takes years to master. But now someone's thread on a discussion site has given me the means (by accident?) of getting Linux up and running... so I have just taken the first step and got a program to run on my old PC.
I am only using 32-bit as that is what the computer does. I found it had just 2.5Gb "spare on the 40Gb drive, but need >7.7Gb for Linux. Hence I am removing lots of files that were stored on this computer (it is my old "stand-by" computer). My plan is to develop sufficient "expertise" (or ham-fisted groping) of Linux on the old Dell, before my more modern half-decent Dell computer falls over with MS/Windows getting so HUGE! Then when I am comfortable with Linux I shall convert the newer computer and get shot of MS (forever?). - Is that sensible? (You talk of "dual-boot system" - probably not for me?). Or do I need to shell out hard cash for another flippin' PC?
You suggest I am scared of 8Gb... - Not so. I have accumulated nearly 20Gb of data files in 30 years... The 8Gb is just the space needed just to load Linux - without space for stuff to work. Things like "defrag" and other service programs just need 15% of disc space - which is 6Gb on a 40Gb disk. Linux alone would be <20% of the hard-drive disc space, and I can easily run all the data files from a USB and have another 50% spare. Windows etc. programmes use over 50% of my hard-drive, leaving too little free space for the PC to be useful. Therefore Linux looks like good space saving at first glance. Do tell me if I am doing a stupid thing? - I simply don't know.
But thanks for your time and patience in listening to my "tales".. Your advice is good, even though we don't know the Linux system I have... Some things you say are what I guessed I should do... and it is nice to have your support telling me what I figured out I should be doing.
K2
 

RM-MN

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1. Linux (any version I have used) can read all Windows files. Windows (at least until very recently) cannot read Linux files.
2. Every time I have installed Linux it is with a dual boot with Windows. You do have to be careful and read the instruction so you don't overwrite the Windows partition.
3. Used hard drives are cheap in the US, probably also in the UK. Check Ebay. I just bought a 500 GB SATA drive for 11.46 USD delivered to my door, plenty of room for Windows, Linux, and a bunch of other things. My current computer only has space for one hard drive so the new one isn't installed yet.
 
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Hi AJ, I just found the "download" from Linux : I tried ubuntu-14.04.6-server-i386. (as directed by the thread I had found).
But, as mentioned above, LINUX decided I needed something that I recall was "18. something"... as I assumed it was from 2018? - The 2014 software being too obsolete for any self-respecting computer hack. (My 1995 PC still works... but is impossible to use, as it is too fast and won't handle ""modern" huge files).
K2
 

RM-MN

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Hi AJ, I just found the "download" from Linux : I tried ubuntu-14.04.6-server-i386. (as directed by the thread I had found).
But, as mentioned above, LINUX decided I needed something that I recall was "18. something"... as I assumed it was from 2018? - The 2014 software being too obsolete for any self-respecting computer hack. (My 1995 PC still works... but is impossible to use, as it is too fast and won't handle ""modern" huge files).
K2
The leading number on a Linux distrubution is simply a build number and has nothing to do with the year it was released. I use Linux Mint (it has proprietary drivers which Ubuntu does not) and the latest version of that is 20.3. Unless you plan to use this computer as a server to a large network you probably do not want any version that says "server" in its name. Any of them will work as a server for a home network.
 

awake

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The leading number on a Linux distrubution is simply a build number and has nothing to do with the year it was released. I use Linux Mint (it has proprietary drivers which Ubuntu does not) and the latest version of that is 20.3. Unless you plan to use this computer as a server to a large network you probably do not want any version that says "server" in its name. Any of them will work as a server for a home network.
Actually, with Ubuntu, the leading version number DOES represent the year. They usually release in April and in October, so the last two releases were 21.04 and 21.10. They will add a "cutesy" name to this, but IMHO the number is easier to remember and more useful.

An important fact: the April release in even years is a "Long Term Support" release. If you want the most stable possible system, only install this release. (The next one is coming up in a couple of months - 22.04.) This release will continue to update itself with respect to any security issues for something like 8 years. If you want to try new & developing features, then you can update with the intermediate releases, but these are only supported for 12 months or something like that.
 

BaronJ

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Sorry AJ: I'll have to finish removing loads of data files from the "win" set-up before I can get back to the Linux and see what the software is called. When I tried to install the Linux software I had "clicked" on the Linux website (a bit of a guess as to what I was selecting) LINUX told me that it wasn't suitable (out-of-date) and said it would install ##@::;'# instead. Which worked! And the name was something conjured up by someone who only spoke "computer", so not a name I could remember.
But when I switch off, re-set and load up Linux from the USB again I'll be able to get the name of the software. No rush, I'm having a couple of weeks holiday soon and this has taken a year to get this far. So many Interweb sets of instructions didn't do anything for me, this is a vast subject and one that probably takes years to master. But now someone's thread on a discussion site has given me the means (by accident?) of getting Linux up and running... so I have just taken the first step and got a program to run on my old PC.
I am only using 32-bit as that is what the computer does. I found it had just 2.5Gb "spare on the 40Gb drive, but need >7.7Gb for Linux. Hence I am removing lots of files that were stored on this computer (it is my old "stand-by" computer). My plan is to develop sufficient "expertise" (or ham-fisted groping) of Linux on the old Dell, before my more modern half-decent Dell computer falls over with MS/Windows getting so HUGE! Then when I am comfortable with Linux I shall convert the newer computer and get shot of MS (forever?). - Is that sensible? (You talk of "dual-boot system" - probably not for me?). Or do I need to shell out hard cash for another flippin' PC?
You suggest I am scared of 8Gb... - Not so. I have accumulated nearly 20Gb of data files in 30 years... The 8Gb is just the space needed just to load Linux - without space for stuff to work. Things like "defrag" and other service programs just need 15% of disc space - which is 6Gb on a 40Gb disk. Linux alone would be <20% of the hard-drive disc space, and I can easily run all the data files from a USB and have another 50% spare. Windows etc. programmes use over 50% of my hard-drive, leaving too little free space for the PC to be useful. Therefore Linux looks like good space saving at first glance. Do tell me if I am doing a stupid thing? - I simply don't know.
But thanks for your time and patience in listening to my "tales".. Your advice is good, even though we don't know the Linux system I have... Some things you say are what I guessed I should do... and it is nice to have your support telling me what I figured out I should be doing.
K2

Hi Steamchick,

Simply do what I suggested months ago ! Download the Q4OS live 32 bit ISO and burn a CD ! Boot from the CD and simply run Linux directly from the CD. Nothing to install and all your files will be available to you. As far as connecting to your router is concerned use the Q4OS control centre and put the details in there for a wired DHCP connection.
 

ajoeiam

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Sorry AJ: I'll have to finish removing loads of data files from the "win" set-up before I can get back to the Linux and see what the software is called. When I tried to install the Linux software I had "clicked" on the Linux website (a bit of a guess as to what I was selecting) LINUX told me that it wasn't suitable (out-of-date) and said it would install ##@::;'# instead. Which worked! And the name was something conjured up by someone who only spoke "computer", so not a name I could remember.
But when I switch off, re-set and load up Linux from the USB again I'll be able to get the name of the software. No rush, I'm having a couple of weeks holiday soon and this has taken a year to get this far. So many Interweb sets of instructions didn't do anything for me, this is a vast subject and one that probably takes years to master. But now someone's thread on a discussion site has given me the means (by accident?) of getting Linux up and running... so I have just taken the first step and got a program to run on my old PC.
I am only using 32-bit as that is what the computer does. I found it had just 2.5Gb "spare on the 40Gb drive, but need >7.7Gb for Linux. Hence I am removing lots of files that were stored on this computer (it is my old "stand-by" computer). My plan is to develop sufficient "expertise" (or ham-fisted groping) of Linux on the old Dell, before my more modern half-decent Dell computer falls over with MS/Windows getting so HUGE! Then when I am comfortable with Linux I shall convert the newer computer and get shot of MS (forever?). - Is that sensible? (You talk of "dual-boot system" - probably not for me?). Or do I need to shell out hard cash for another flippin' PC?
You suggest I am scared of 8Gb... - Not so. I have accumulated nearly 20Gb of data files in 30 years... The 8Gb is just the space needed just to load Linux - without space for stuff to work. Things like "defrag" and other service programs just need 15% of disc space - which is 6Gb on a 40Gb disk. Linux alone would be <20% of the hard-drive disc space, and I can easily run all the data files from a USB and have another 50% spare. Windows etc. programmes use over 50% of my hard-drive, leaving too little free space for the PC to be useful. Therefore Linux looks like good space saving at first glance. Do tell me if I am doing a stupid thing? - I simply don't know.
But thanks for your time and patience in listening to my "tales".. Your advice is good, even though we don't know the Linux system I have... Some things you say are what I guessed I should do... and it is nice to have your support telling me what I figured out I should be doing.
K2


You know - - - used computers are quite reasonable!! (You don't even want to know what my main box set me back when I bought it - - - in 2012 - - - - and its running fine - - -b ut then I over spec cooling and will continue to do such!!!)
I bought 2 for use as testing platforms. Something like $400 gets one something that's actually not a bad machine.
What I did was a little different. I just bought another HDD and pulled the existing one that had the win installation.
IIRC (I no longer keep any kind of regular tabs on pricing!!) a 1 TB drive is selling in the around $75 range and that's for a better level of drive than the cheapest available. I had issues with even a not quite the cheapest - - - bought all 'red' level drives lately (meant for raid arrays) and have some quite decent life on those.

You have accumulated 20 GB of files in 30 years - - - - seriously - - - - I 'bout had a mess to clean up on the floor I was laughing so hard. I've been accumulating that or somewhat more every year for quite a while and its not getting any smaller. Some of my present projects are likely going to generate that much data by themselves every year and maybe more - - - - data seems to expand when you're storing you know!!!

There are still parts of a system I bought in 1999 that are in regular use here - - - and it still does an excellent job.
Old hardware chosen carefully - - - - well - - - - it can still do a great job.

I like the idea of running a live system - - - - but if you really want to replace M$ - - - - well just get another cheap machine and I'm sure we can pilot you through your stuff. The nice thing about doing this is that its not that expensive and you do have a fair amount of control on things!!!!!!

Over and out for now
 
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Hi Steamchick,

Simply do what I suggested months ago ! Download the Q4OS live 32 bit ISO and burn a CD ! Boot from the CD and simply run Linux directly from the CD. Nothing to install and all your files will be available to you. As far as connecting to your router is concerned use the Q4OS control centre and put the details in there for a wired DHCP connection.
Thanks Baron, but after spending a week trying to get Q40S working, I believed it when it didn't work on my computer.
That's why I have been another umpteen weeks carting on with at least 4 other systems before getting something to work. I'm sorry your suggestion didn't work, but it was some unknown incompatability, possibly the human doing it, butif it had worked I would have said a big "Thankyou".
K2.
 
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You know - - - used computers are quite reasonable!!
Something like $400 gets one something that's actually not a bad machine.
What I did was a little different. I just bought another HDD and pulled the existing one that had the win installation.
IIRC a 1 TB drive is selling in the around $75 range and that's for a better level of drive than the cheapest available. I had issues with even a not quite the cheapest - - - bought all 'red' level drives lately (meant for raid arrays) and have some quite decent life on those.

You have accumulated 20 GB of files in 30 years - - - - seriously - - - - I 'bout had a mess to clean up on the floor I was laughing so hard. I've been accumulating that or somewhat more every year for quite a while and its not getting any smaller. Some of my present projects are likely going to generate that much data by themselves every year and maybe more - - - - data seems to expand when you're storing you know!!!

There are still parts of a system I bought in 1999 that are in regular use here - - - and it still does an excellent job.
Old hardware chosen carefully - - - - well - - - - it can still do a great job.

I like the idea of running a live system - - - - but if you really want to replace M$ - - - - well just get another cheap machine and I'm sure we can pilot you through your stuff. The nice thing about doing this is that its not that expensive and you do have a fair amount of control on things!!!!!!

Over and out for now
Thanks for the wisdom AJ. All my PCs are second hand. The most expensive £40. $400 gets me a flight to the USA, so I have no desire to spend that on a computer.
I'll let you know when I get stuck again,as I'm on holiday for a couple of weeks now.
Cheers!
K2
 

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