Home built pistol

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kf2qd

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Plinkin is the process of pokin holes in tin cans, soda bottles, blocks of wood and other objects for the fun of it with some sort of fire-arm, bow or slingshot. As a side effect it also tends to improve one's marksmanship skills.
 

steamer

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kf2qd said:
Plinkin is the process of pokin holes in tin cans, soda bottles, blocks of wood and other objects for the fun of it with some sort of fire-arm, bow or slingshot. As a side effect it also tends to improve one's marksmanship skills.
YUP!

Some items are more fun to "plink" with than others...hehehe

Dave
 

radfordc

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Here is the firing pin assembly. Firing pin is drill rod hardened and tempered. The assembly fits into the breech block and is held with one 1/8" cross pin.

firing pin assembly.jpg


firing pin assembly2.jpg


barrel and receiver2.jpg
 

radfordc

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I made the fitting for bolting on the stock and the locking lever that locks the action. Notice the missing screw...broke a tap in the hole. The action is locked tight with a cartridge in the chamber. Everything snug and smooth.

This will be the last post for several weeks as I have to go out of town for business this week and then next Saturday the wife and I leave for a two week cruise through the Panama Canal.

locking lever.jpg
 

xo18thfa

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.45 Long Colt is a straight case, I think. Did you just straight bore the chamber?
 

Twmaster

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Radfordc...

I've been following your thread on Garage Gunsmithing. Nice.
 

radfordc

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xo18thfa said:
.45 Long Colt is a straight case, I think. Did you just straight bore the chamber?
I first made a reamer using the dimensions in the SAMMI data book. This reamer unfortunately cut the chamber oversize because it warped when I quenched it.

For the actual barrel I used a three step process. First, I made a D reamer to cut the straight portion of the chamber to a depth of 1.25". This was followed with a throating reamer to cut the tapered throat. And finally, I used a boring bar to cut the rim recess to a depth of .060".
 

Herbiev

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Radfordc. Have a great cruise and we look forward to more photos upon your return
 

radfordc

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Home from vacation about two weeks ago and have been finishing up the pistol project. Everything functional is finished...just need to do some detail work, bluing, etc. Maybe I will get a chance to try it out next weekend.

finished.jpg


finished2.jpg
 

Chaffe

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looking very nice, do you have any info on the bluing process? was it hot or cold blued? thanks
 

tel

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That bluing turned out very well - share the secret! ;D
 

Elmo4895

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I like your build. I have been pondering on building a handgun based on modified Chicopee plans. And here is one in the flesh era steel.
Elmo
 

stragenmitsuko

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Very nice .
One more follower .

Someday I will also try building a gun .

I'm a bit of a fan of .22 replica's of "famous" guns .
Like the gatling fi . Or the mauser C96 "broomstick" .
The tompson smg would also be on my list .
Sadly information and plans are very hard to find .

Pat
 

Xtyl27

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Absolutely beautiful work on the gun and on everything I've seen in this forum. I almost quit the forum when the anti-gun comments started showing up. I understand the motivations to protect everyone, but we are a partially stupid species and I've yet to see the human genius who did not portray incredible stupidity in one area or another; as a species - this is cultural - we tolerate risk, knowing we are capable of making deadly mistakes, so that our culture may advance as rapidly as possible in technology.
If as a society we put safety first - truly - we would not have long haul trucks on our highways in the U.S. All long haul shipping would be on trains. More than half of the families killed on our highways every year are due to little cars sharing the same roads with gigantic trucks. We would not have gas stoves in our kitchens. Every year people die from misuse of gas appliances or defects in gas appliances. We would not have 110 AC in our wall outlets, which kill many people, especially children. We would convert all houses and all appliances to 12 volts DC, where the electrocution hazard is virtually zero.
In the end, we have a choice as a species: complete safety and no freedom whatsoever...OR...freedom of choice and we accept lethal risks as part of that freedom, unavoidable.
I am encouraged that the moderators of this forum saw fit to maintain freedom. I have several really fun and different gun projects I wish to do and post; I look forward to learning from the masters here.

Best, Charlie
PS: In the U.S., it is STILL a constitutionally protected freedom to build your own gun without needing to register it - as a matter of fact, the ATF does not even allow the registration of home built guns - so long as it is not a machine gun or larger in caliber than 50, and so long as you never sell it or give it away...you can't even pass it on to your heirs, which sucks. In addition, if the gun is muzzle loading and uses percussion caps (type of propellant is irrelevant), it is also not-registerable and it is completely legal - even for felons - so long as you do not exceed .50" in caliber.
 

editor123

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PS: In the U.S., it is STILL a constitutionally protected freedom to build your own gun without needing to register it - as a matter of fact, the ATF does not even allow the registration of home built guns - so long as it is not a machine gun or larger in caliber than 50, and so long as you never sell it or give it away...you can't even pass it on to your heirs, which sucks. In addition, if the gun is muzzle loading and uses percussion caps (type of propellant is irrelevant), it is also not-registerable and it is completely legal - even for felons - so long as you do not exceed .50" in caliber.
I was told by one of the folks who sell the Gatling plans that it is indeed legal to build a firearm but the only way to legally dispose of it other than destruction is to bequeath it to someone. I am not a lawyer so take my input with a large spoon of salt.
 

ldsgeek

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The federal rule is, in general terms, you cannot make a firearm with the intention of selling it, state laws may vary from this of course. However, you can sell firearms that you have made, or give them away, or pass the to your heirs, legally, as long as the recipient is legal to receive them. They do not need to have a serial number or other identifying marks, although it is recommended that you do so in case of theft. If you make a firearm for someone else, that's when you need a license. So make them, enjoy them, and if you tire of them pass them on to others. All of this can be verified at the BATFE website.
 
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