Geting Started in Model Engine Building

Discussion in 'HMEM Forum Support & Suggestions' started by Tin Falcon, May 16, 2010.

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  1. Apr 16, 2011 #21

    Philjoe5

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    Good stuff Tin. #1 is Definitely a good reference to have.

    Cheers,
    Phil
     
  2. Apr 22, 2011 #22

    Tin Falcon

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  3. Jun 26, 2011 #23

    Tin Falcon

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    A very basic hand tool manual like how to read a scale etc good foundational material many of us take for granted.


    USAF care and use of hand tools and measuring tools.
    http://www.robins.af.mil/shared/media/document/AFD-091006-041.pdf

    and another great classic on machining
    the Complete Practical Machinist by Joshua Rose.
    http://www.archive.org/details/completepractica00roseuoft

    Aerospace Metals
    http://www.robins.af.mil/shared/media/document/AFD-091006-039.pdf

    Pamphlet on machining stainless steel
    http://www.ssina.com/download_a_file/machining.pdf
    Tin
     
  4. Aug 14, 2011 #24

    Tin Falcon

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    Here is an old classic on metal working . Kind of forgot about it.
    Originally published in IIRC 1556 by Georgius Agricola. Translated to English by Herbert Hoover and his wife. Published in 1912. the book was released into public domain by the Hoovers and republished by Dover press around 1950.
    Great history on mining refining etc.
    PDF etc here:

    http://www.archive.org/details/deremetallica50agri
    Tin
     
  5. Sep 16, 2011 #25

    Tin Falcon

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    For those of you looking for better than average mini micro machine tools look here
    http://www.proxxon.com/us/
    the company was started in Germany in 1977 North American Headquarters in Hickory NC USA
    they have mill lathes drill presses. hand held grinders etc.
    you will have to look at other sites for prices but you get to see the full line of tools.
    Tin
     
  6. Dec 10, 2011 #26

    Tin Falcon

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  7. May 14, 2012 #27

    Tin Falcon

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    One of the ways to enter this hobby is to buy a pre a machined engine, and assemble it.
    It is not always eassy to have the time money , skill vision and commitment to get started. have a working engine in hand can help fuel the fire.
    so hear are the options I know of.
    PM research :

    http://www.pmmodelengines.com/

    [​IMG]

    3AM $88


    [​IMG]
    3BIM $ 138


    TIN
     
  8. May 14, 2012 #28

    Tin Falcon

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  9. Jun 16, 2012 #29

    90LX_Notch

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  10. Jun 16, 2012 #30

    Tin Falcon

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    Tapmatic Corperation tapping question handbook . I do not expect a newby to go out and buy a tapping head and I am not promoting Tapmatic.
    I am posting this link because it has lots of information about taps tapping and drill size section.And if you come across a deal on a tapping head you will know what it is and how to use it.

    http://tapmatic.com/images/pdf/Tapping%20Questions%20HB.pdf
    a tapping head is mostly a production tool but they are handy for tapping lots of holes

    and another one
    http://www.kennametal.com/images/pdf/products_services/metalworking/GTD_technical_data.pdf

    Tin
     
  11. Aug 18, 2012 #31

    robcas631

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    I find the introduction informative! There is a wealth of knowledge here!
     
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  12. Aug 18, 2012 #32

    workshopman

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    If your first project is to be a small stationary steam engine, as it often is, then the following may be of help. This shows the methods for making a Stuart 10V/H using just a lathe and drilling machine.
    http://www.homews.co.uk/page42.html

    Harold
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2013
  13. Aug 18, 2012 #33

    gus

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    Hi Harold,
    I agree. This forum is great help.We can tap the expertise of so many hobby machinist,retired professional machinist,Die and Tool Makers etc.Forum members are very polite.I wish the Singapore Fishing Forum would follow your good example. Good catdhes I post get ugly uncalled for comments,

    Gus too is embarking on building a 0.46 Glow Plug Engine with plans from the UK Model Engineer Magazine. As I proceed I will post fotos and progress report.Will take three months to complete And Gus is in no hurry. Why rush and why take time to get parts done to print and personal satisfaction.
     
  14. Sep 3, 2012 #34

    Tin Falcon

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    the Popular Mechanics Magazines have been published since 1910 and with the advent of modern technology Google books has made them available in electronic format. (You may have known this but thought I would mention it here.)

    http://books.google.com/books/about/Popular_Mechanics.html?id=RdMDAAAAMBAJ
    for those of you who do not know from the 1930s into the 1960s there were a good amount of steam engine projects published as well as how to articles related to lathes shaper and other home shop tools.

    many of these projects focused on scrounged materials and minimal shop tools available. so enjoy searching and browsing the archives.
    Be prepared to be creative because some of the materials are at best now from antiques.
    Tin
     
  15. Sep 8, 2012 #35

    Tin Falcon

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    I am always on the lookout for resources to help beginners in the home Machinist /model engine hobby. I came across some beginners video on you-tube produced by smithy.
    http://www.smithy.com/traning-videos

    If you click on the Machining help tab you will see a list of additional resources that may be of interest to folks here.

    This link should be of particular interest to owners of of 3 in 1 machines smithy's specialty.

    I am not endorsing smithy or recommending a 3 in 1. but I do know that the 3 in 1 is a viable choice and some folks have them.
    also this appears to be basic info applicable to all machine shops with lathe and or mill.


    I watched the first 3 (lathe) videos) they are packed with info a bit fast on the video cuts. and cover a lot of material in a short time. so not long or boring and can easily be reviewed repeatedly if something is missed.
    these videos are as I mentioned earlier on you tube.
    This could be the info needed to get good results from your 3 in 1
    Tin .
     
  16. Sep 16, 2012 #36

    Stieglitz

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    Thanks Tin Falcon will be a great start for me
     
  17. Apr 9, 2013 #37

    Lawijt

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    Search on youtube for "myfordboy". Also very interesting to watch. I learn some things from him. But stil a lot to learn......
     
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  18. Jul 28, 2013 #38

    TimBurks13

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    I found a very useful resource out here thanks for the sharing friends.
     
  19. Jul 28, 2013 #39

    Tinkerer58

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    A great book I have used when I first started some 4 years ago and still use today is-- Model Engineering A Foundation Course by Peter Wright.
    It covers everything from Setting up a Workshop, Measuring & Marking out, Basic Hand Work, Bending & Forming, Metal Joining, Hole Production, Threads, Basic Lathe Work & Tooling, Holding Work in the Lathe, Principles of Turning, Basic Lathe Practice , Adapting the Lathe includes milling and other work, Buying a Lathe.

    Other books I found very useful for beginners are school text books generally available in second hand book stores.
     
  20. Jul 28, 2013 #40

    vascon2196

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    Tin...these videos are awesome. I use them in my Manufacturing Processes class to help prepare my students in using our machines.
     
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