Enhancing old, tired eyes.

Discussion in 'Machining with Disabilities' started by DICKEYBIRD, Nov 16, 2008.

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  1. Nov 16, 2008 #1

    DICKEYBIRD

    DICKEYBIRD

    DICKEYBIRD

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    About 15 years ago I realized I wasn't able to see little stuff properly, even with my reading glasses on. I bought a headband magnifyer as pictured here and WOW, what a difference! It's so much easier dealing with everything in the shop...from tool grinding to reading the little numbers on a boring head. Especially nice when lining up on a center pop mark. I recommend them highly for anyone; especially us old folks. ;D

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Nov 16, 2008 #2

    BobWarfield

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    I use them myself. Extremely handy for small parts!

    You can set them up so that you can see below the magnifier or look up slightly to see through the magnifier. Very comfortable to use that way.

    Best,

    BW
     
  3. Nov 16, 2008 #3

    GailInNM

    GailInNM

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    They are one of the most used tools in my shop. I have 4 of the Optivisor brand. One each in 2,3,5 and 10 power. Each has it's uses and when not in use they are stored on the vertical of one of my workbenches that is in a central location in the shop. Then they are never more than a step or two away from me. Notice the BIG numbers on them. Each faceplate has the power printed on it, but it is too small for me to read with out magnification. This way I can keep them in order on the wall easily and pick the one I want quickly.
    Gail in NM,USA
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Nov 16, 2008 #4

    rake60

    rake60

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    It's been a lot of years since I could read the tenths lines on a mic or the lines
    on a vernier caliper without a little help. I found these safety glasses with a built
    in X2 bifocal magnifier.
    [​IMG]
    Of course the visor magnifier is also near by for the smaller bits.

    Rick


     
  5. Nov 17, 2008 #5

    mklotz

    mklotz

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    For folks who already wear eyeglasses, clip-on stereo "Opticaids"

    http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INPDFF?PMPAGE=393&PARTPG=INLMK32

    achieve the same result as and are far less cumbersome than the visors.

    Like the visors, one can look "under them" easily to view something normally and they can be flipped up when not needed.
     
  6. Nov 17, 2008 #6

    Cedge

    Cedge

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    I normally use reading glasses for "close" work. Unfortunately the definition of "close" is getting further and further away. I've reached the point where the work zone of my lathe is now "close" work these days.

    After me mentioning the problem, the wife got me a pair of reading glasses that seemed to help, but after years and years of 20-10 vision they just didn't quite measure up to my expectations. I recently broke them and needed a new pair. We were in the local dollar store and I asked her what strength I had been wearing. She had forgotten, so I began trying on glasses. I figured the stronger they were, the more benefit I'd get. It only took me a couple of pairs to learn an important lesson or two.

    One.... if you need reading glasses, go and try them on and test the results.
    Two... stronger magnification is not always the right answer

    After testing #2 through #3.5 powers, it became quite obvious that the field of focus got closer and closer to my nose, as the numbers grew. Not a good thing when you want to see things right where the metal is flying and big knuckled chucks are spinning. I then tried on a pair of #1's and things came into focus right where I wanted them to be clear. The #.75's focused my field of vision to the far side of the work zone but could be usable in a pinch. The #2's and above had the focus much closer.... even to within inches of my face.

    Bottom line... don't assume anything where vision aids are concerned. Try them before you buy. You'll see much better and while the headaches will still happen, it won't be from the wrong glasses.

    I use the over the glasses style safety glasses for chip deterrence. Somewhat clumsy, but being slightly claustrophobic, I just don't do the close confinements of a face shield very well.

    Steve
     
  7. Jan 20, 2010 #7

    wm460

    wm460

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    Location:
    Tennant Creek Middle of Australia
    Rick, where did you get these from I have been looking for some but does not appear to be available in Australia.
    The optician quoted me $450 for a pair of 1.5 magnification safty glasses. :mad: :mad:


     
  8. Jan 20, 2010 #8

    GailInNM

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  9. Jan 20, 2010 #9

    Maryak

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    wm460,

    I wear a pair of clear plastic safety glasses over my "normal" bifocals. For close work I have a pair of single mag, (+3), under the clear plastic and for welding where my eyes move around more and are further from the job, I have a pair of +2 single lenses worn under a standard helmet.

    Opticians in Oz are one of the more blatant rip offs we endure regarding the price of lenses and more especially frames.

    Gail's optivisor type are available through medical instrument suppliers in Oz.

    Hope this helps.

    Best Regards
    Bob
     
  10. Jan 21, 2010 #10

    Stan

    Stan

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    I am as critical as anybody about Walmart, but they do understand the concept of fair pricing. With my eye problems, I have to replace a lens quite frequently. Opticians want $200.00 per lens and Walmart charges $60.00. Complete glasses with metal frames cost $150.00 with Progressive lenses and an eye test.
     
  11. May 1, 2010 #11

    Royal Viking

    Royal Viking

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    I can't believed I am posting this. I was turning some spacers for motor mounts yesterday and could not see the work very well. I guess I need to get my prescription checked. This morning I was at the auto parts store buying a v-belt and saw a pair of magnifying glasses in the bargain box. Anyway they let me take them out of the packaging to see if they would work for me. Yes, I bought them. ;D
     
  12. May 1, 2010 #12

    mklotz

    mklotz

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    The problem with those supermarket reading glasses is that, if you have any astigmatism, you'll find your eyes straining badly in a short time. I have only very mild astigmatism and can only wear them for a few minutes before they become uncomfortable.
     
  13. Jul 5, 2010 #13
    on the subject of enhanceing old tired eyes my 60yr old dad finaly got the bottle to go and have lazer eye treatment a while ago and said its so good he claims he can see like he was 18 again he dont need glasses anymore
    but a remark from my brother when my dad said that was (what its made you into a womanizer has it dad ) i nearly wet myself laughing with the look on myn dads face i just wish i had a camera at the time
     

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