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johnmcc69

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Excellent job on that!
What kind of solution did you use for the "blackening"?

John
 

kuhncw

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celsoari,

During the late 80s and early 90s, I traveled to Sao Paulo several times on business. I enjoyed your country very much. The people were helpful and friendly and I certainly enjoyed the food.

Regards,

Chuck
 

celsoari

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celsoari,

During the late 80s and early 90s, I traveled to Sao Paulo several times on business. I enjoyed your country very much. The people were helpful and friendly and I certainly enjoyed the food.

Regards,

Chuck

Certainly the food here is very good. I live in Curitiba, about 400 km from São Paulo towards the south
greetings
Celso Ari
 

Richard Hed

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I want to send my son to S. America to visit Uruquay and Paraguay with stops elsewhere, but he is resistant to the idea. He is learning several languages and he prefers to go to "Wuhanville" (just kidding), but he does prefer Mandarin and Japanese over most others.
 

celsoari

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Here in South America, Brazil is the only country that speaks Portuguese, most of the rest of the countries speak Spanish

I want to send my son to S. America to visit Uruquay and Paraguay with stops elsewhere, but he is resistant to the idea. He is learning several languages and he prefers to go to "Wuhanville" (just kidding), but he does prefer Mandarin and Japanese over most others.
 

Richard Hed

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Here in South America, Brazil is the only country that speaks Portuguese, most of the rest of the countries speak Spanish
Yes, Portuguesa is close enough to Spanish the he could pick that up rapidly. After all, Spanish is just another dialect of Portuguesa anyway.
 

goldstar31

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Yes, Portuguesa is close enough to Spanish the he could pick that up rapidly. After all, Spanish is just another dialect of Portuguesa anyway.

Really yje origins of the Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French and 'English' are from the Latin but are altered by boy foreign and original languages. But then Rome's Latin was influenced with Ancient Greek.
Ironically, 'Alice in Wonderland's' father - well Alice Liddell helped create the Greek Lexicon.

I sort of had a 'Classical Education' and even oddly and written in excellent Castillian Spanish on my Escrituras de Poder that I was a Spanish Don. I was a man of property rather like Galsworthy:D
 

Richard Hed

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Really yje origins of the Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French and 'English' are from the Latin but are altered by boy foreign and original languages. But then Rome's Latin was influenced with Ancient Greek.
Ironically, 'Alice in Wonderland's' father - well Alice Liddell helped create the Greek Lexicon.

I sort of had a 'Classical Education' and even oddly and written in excellent Castillian Spanish on my Escrituras de Poder that I was a Spanish Don. I was a man of property rather like Galsworthy:D
Actually, My moniker is just a trap for peeps who wish to make fun of me on my utube comments. More than one person has gotten chewed up by springing that trap. My real name is Don, Hed General. LOL. No, just Don. For my Mexican amigos, I am Donito, or Little Lord, sort of, in English. My Philippino friends don't get that joke.

Yes, if you speak or learn one of those languages (but not English), the rest are much easier to learn. I've noticed most other European languages, including English and Russian, of all things, have tons and tons of latin and Greek based words and thus are a lilttle easier to learn just because of that. I read a bit of Russian and it is surprising how many words the Russians have that are the same as Spanish, one would thimk that it would have lots of Latin based words, which it does, but Spanish? Where did that come from?
 

goldstar31

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Yes, if you speak or learn one of those languages (but not English), the rest are much easier to learn. I've noticed most other European languages, including English and Russian, of all things, have tons and tons of latin and Greek based words and thus are a lilttle easier to learn just because of that. I read a bit of Russian and it is surprising how many words the Russians have that are the same as Spanish, one would thimk that it would have lots of Latin based words, which it does, but Spanish? Where did that come from?
The Spanish words in the Russian language are ridiculously simple.

In a word 'the Hapsburg's explains it.
Meanwhile back to a semblance of engineering? We all know the word Vernier? Right he lived and died in Ornans in the Jura- not the damned film but in France. But he worked for the King of pao who was part of the Hapsburg Empire. The Hapsburg Empire not only embraced Spain but - the Austro Hungarian Empire.

'We' Brits have a monarchy mainly German - Sax Coburg Gotha with a Greek prince who was also German extraction whilst dear old Elizabeth Alexandra Mary was sort of half German with a mother who was sort of cots but with a North East of England connection( Lizzie Bowes- Lyon). Whether my 2 kids( not me) are vaguely related seems feasible.

Of course ' Lyon' is French.
Not easy is it?

Norman

' Somewhere on MY genes on my mother's side is the little dark skinned hill people whilst my father, unquestionably, was Nordic with piercing steel blue eyes.'
 

Richard Hed

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The Spanish words in the Russian language are ridiculously simple.

In a word 'the Hapsburg's explains it.
Meanwhile back to a semblance of engineering? We all know the word Vernier? Right he lived and died in Ornans in the Jura- not the damned film but in France. But he worked for the King of pao who was part of the Hapsburg Empire. The Hapsburg Empire not only embraced Spain but - the Austro Hungarian Empire.

'We' Brits have a monarchy mainly German - Sax Coburg Gotha with a Greek prince who was also German extraction whilst dear old Elizabeth Alexandra Mary was sort of half German with a mother who was sort of cots but with a North East of England connection( Lizzie Bowes- Lyon). Whether my 2 kids( not me) are vaguely related seems feasible.

Of course ' Lyon' is French.
Not easy is it?

Norman

' Somewhere on MY genes on my mother's side is the little dark skinned hill people whilst my father, unquestionably, was Nordic with piercing steel blue eyes.'
I love learning about peoples 'gens'. I am quarter Cherokee (my Brother thimks it is Mandan), quarter Polish, quarter Russian Jew and quarter Dane. My kidz are half that and the rest mongrels of Philippines with Chinese bits and Spanish bits.
 

terryd

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Really yje origins of the Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French and 'English' are from the Latin but are altered by boy foreign and original languages. But then Rome's Latin was influenced with Ancient Greek.
Ironically, 'Alice in Wonderland's' father - well Alice Liddell helped create the Greek Lexicon.

I sort of had a 'Classical Education' and even oddly and written in excellent Castillian Spanish on my Escrituras de Poder that I was a Spanish Don. I was a man of property rather like Galsworthy:D
Hi Goldstar,

I would beg to differ on your description of English as being of Latin origin. English is mostly derived on Low Germanic languages and Northern Germanic languages which were variants of the proto Indo-European languages of the Great Migration. The former was spoken by the Angles and Saxons who invaded following the retreat of the Romans: the latter from the invasion of the Viking nations who occupied much of Northern Britain until defeat and assimilation into a reunited country that became known as Engaland (Angleland) then England.

The Norman invasion of 1066 introduced Norman French which was more or less a Romantic (Latin based) language and introduced some French into the English language as they insisted that the transactional language used in England was Norman French (Remember that the people of Normandy were Norsemen aka Vikings who invaded and intermarried with local Franks) English was for the plebs. Of course, there is also a little Celtic left in English from the Brythonic peoples who had invaded before the Romans.

The languages of Southern Europe, Italian, Spanish Portuguese etc were also Romantic languages together with French. As some else said we all have teh '57 Varieties in us but we are all African origin.

TerryD
 

goldstar31

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I seem to recall reading it somewhere.
Bronowski - perhaps.
I DO recall him in Desert Island Disks saying
"thank you for humouring me'
 

Richard Hed

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Hi Goldstar,

I would beg to differ on your description of English as being of Latin origin. English is mostly derived on Low Germanic languages and Northern Germanic languages which were variants of the proto Indo-European languages of the Great Migration. The former was spoken by the Angles and Saxons who invaded following the retreat of the Romans: the latter from the invasion of the Viking nations who occupied much of Northern Britain until defeat and assimilation into a reunited country that became known as Engaland (Angleland) then England.

The Norman invasion of 1066 introduced Norman French which was more or less a Romantic (Latin based) language and introduced some French into the English language as they insisted that the transactional language used in England was Norman French (Remember that the people of Normandy were Norsemen aka Vikings who invaded and intermarried with local Franks) English was for the plebs. Of course, there is also a little Celtic left in English from the Brythonic peoples who had invaded before the Romans.

The languages of Southern Europe, Italian, Spanish Portuguese etc were also Romantic languages together with French. As some else said we all have teh '57 Varieties in us but we are all African origin.

TerryD
ONe of m;y ex-girl friends was whining to me about how "You white people" enslaved her race, in which I tried to explain how my grandfather, a white man, had been enslaved int the late 1890s. she simply would not listen, but my point is that every single person in the world has slavery in their ancestry. Likewise, every single person on earth has royalty in their ancestry. So when I hear someone say about their "royal" blood, I just want to slash it all out (that is their "blue" blood.) No one in the world is "pure" anything except for me: my wife assures me I am pure A**HOLE.

It is very interesting, however, to learn about all those invasions and how they add or subtract from a language. I have always been fascinated (genius is always fascinated by what others consider petty things--Einstein got his Nobel for something others might consider too small to notice), by what happened to the Engrish language after the invasion of 1066--before that, Pork had been the Engrish version of "pig", Beef had been some version of cow, cattle or what ever, but after that, the Engrish royalty spoke "bloo-blud" and so on and so on.

In the Philippines, the people had about 15,000 words in their vocabulary before the Spanish onslaught (it was far worse than an invasion and involved almost total enslavement), but the language added another 5-15 thou words. After the American "liberation" (LOL) the number of words added is uncountable. The original languages (44 languages and 160 dialects) were mostly nouns of physical objects. Go thru one of their dictionaries and you'll be surprised at virtually no "concepts", ideas, etc. If you watch a movie in Philippino language, they dart in and out of Engrish just because, they do not have the words for what they wish to express in their native language. The Engrish is now part of their accepted language.

I was working on a Cebuano (Visayan) language tutorial and was using a goo quality dictionary. But my niece told me she didn't know what a lot of those words were becasue they are from a long time ago, no longer used! So much for learning a foreign language.
 

awake

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When we lived in the Philippines back in the 60's, we used to call it "halo-halo" (half & half) - but really it was probably more like 1/3 each of original Tagalog, Spanish, and English
 

justisla

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Hi Goldstar,

I would beg to differ on your description of English as being of Latin origin. English is mostly derived on Low Germanic languages and Northern Germanic languages which were variants of the proto Indo-European languages of the Great Migration. The former was spoken by the Angles and Saxons who invaded following the retreat of the Romans: the latter from the invasion of the Viking nations who occupied much of Northern Britain until defeat and assimilation into a reunited country that became known as Engaland (Angleland) then England.

The Norman invasion of 1066 introduced Norman French which was more or less a Romantic (Latin based) language and introduced some French into the English language as they insisted that the transactional language used in England was Norman French (Remember that the people of Normandy were Norsemen aka Vikings who invaded and intermarried with local Franks) English was for the plebs. Of course, there is also a little Celtic left in English from the Brythonic peoples who had invaded before the Romans.

The languages of Southern Europe, Italian, Spanish Portuguese etc were also Romantic languages together with French. As some else said we all have teh '57 Varieties in us but we are all African origin.

TerryD
Seems odd that you tell us that our language does not have latin origins in paragraph No 1. Then spend paragraphs 2 & 3 telling us how it effectively does, through roundabout sources.
All I know is that I still hate, to this day, our latin teacher with his damned "Amo, Amas, Amat", (or whatever it was) & I certainly did not love him.
 
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