Deburr aluminium thin sheet

Discussion in 'Tips and Tricks' started by Sharpie, Nov 10, 2019.

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  1. Nov 10, 2019 #1

    Sharpie

    Sharpie

    Sharpie

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    Whilst not home model, DIY engineers are always the most versatile I find for solutions.

    Having used a Noga single deburr tool for some time it's brilliant, and tried and failed to get any decent consistent result with the twin wheel version, I'm on the look out of alternatives. Both the hand held and bench mounted commercial products are way over my budget.

    It occurred to me that running the sheet through a bench mounted knife sharpener, the type you slide the knife through rather than grinder, might perform a similar function to the twin wheel Noga.

    Anyone used a sharperner for removing edge burs on thin sheet. (16g or there abouts?). In particular the ceramic wheel version?
     
  2. Nov 10, 2019 #2

    petertha

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    There are commercial machines like this. They can get spendy.
    https://www.kbctools.ca/products/search/chamfer?v=j&facet=[["catname","catname","Deburring Machines"]]

    I built a mini version which uses a *edit* Metabo die grinder. I clamp the assembly in a vise, clamp the grinder into the hole, adjust the chamfer height using the knob. It works pretty decent. I use it more for chamfer finishing parts not really sheet metal. The challenge you might have is lifting the sheet metal & guiding it along a Vee bed vs. bringing a tool to the metal edge. I guess it depends on size.

    There are other builds like mine on the net. I was initially inspired by one that Stefan Gotteswinter built. He has his motor pointing up so the end mill is cutting on end. I like that feature & it simplifies things. But, depending on the motor/grinder/router it may also also allow chips to migrate down into the motor windings through the vent holes. Mine lays horizontal, chips drop down & are relatively contained. I am milling on the side of the cutter which makes a good finish but kind of on a localized area. Another challenge is limited carbide tooling that match the die grinder collets.
     

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    Last edited: Nov 11, 2019
  3. Nov 10, 2019 #3

    Sharpie

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    Looks good, similar to the commercial hand held machines. Better on the plate projects I imagine.

    I would tend to agree it's perhaps more aggressive than I'm looking for on thin sheet.

    The commercial machines I've seen, similar to the one you linked, often use opposing flap wheels, pricey just to knock of burrs. Definitely in the nice to have category!

    I think I'm going to keep my eye on discount stores for a ceramic bladed sharpener in the pocket money category, just to test the idea. If it works, I noted a few places sells the replacement ceramic wheels so maybe an opportunity to then get creative turning it into something bench mounted.
     
  4. Jan 7, 2020 #4

    chrsbrbnk

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    I used to work at an outfit where we had to deburr thousands of sheets of half hard and soft stainless and aluminium the best tool for it seemed to be the NogaDB 1000 we had tried several of the motorized products with little success . the product had to be handled (by hand ) and needed a smooth hand friendly edge. the DB 1000 wheel spacing needed to be adjusted to your work thickness and sharp!
     
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  5. Jan 7, 2020 #5

    Sharpie

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    Apologies, missed this reply.

    Looks good but perhaps a bit aggressive for the thin sheet I work with.

    I did look at the commercial machines, pricey for what they are IMO, I'm sure for high volume they provide value for money but not for me. I did wonder if I could rig a table router up with a flappy drum sander wheel and use that.
     
  6. Jan 7, 2020 #6

    Sharpie

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    Interesting, I found the opposite, that is what I was using, it's tedious and rarely neat, difficult on curved corners. Was easier to use a high grit paper on a block and run that over.

    This past couple of weeks, I bought a bench mount for a drill, tried various abrasive discs, so far found the bench mounted roloc to be the simplest. Did 20 or so pieces in no time today. Minor touch up couple of small areas with 320 grit paper after forming.
     
  7. Jan 8, 2020 #7

    chrsbrbnk

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    the spacing between the cutters is relatively important along with edge quality to begin with, really ragged edges from dull shears that sorta thing. the guard needs to literally slide on the edge to keep cutter angle constant . corners seem to be a hassel with virtually all the deburr devices often had to have a manual filing operation or fine grit on a air grinder
     
  8. Jan 15, 2020 #8

    Harry.

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    Might be worth having a look at shaviv deburring tools. I've always found them to be good value for money for finishing products. Maybe have a look for this:
     
  9. Jan 16, 2020 #9

    Dubi

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    I have used Noga tools for more than 45years and have found to be first rate products.

    In fact I have two deburring tools which I bought in Israel in 1984 and they work just as well when I first bought them. I also bought lathe threading tools which still work perfectly. I machine anything from 0.5 to 3.0mm treads perfectly.

    You could not do better but to buy Noga.
     
  10. Jan 24, 2020 #10

    Harry.

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    Am I right in thinking that the E blades are heavy duty versions of the B blades and B blades are slightly better for spiral or powdery swarf?
     
  11. Jan 28, 2020 #11

    Zane.C

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