Cringle boiler build.

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cwelkie

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Nice little boiler and terrific photos with excellent instruction and advice!
You are doing a great job of taking the mystery away.
 

darwenguy

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Ispect joints are good all around..
20210529_142151.jpg

Then onto soldering the boiler bushes.
Clean the bushes then apply flux to them all and all previous joints and on the boiler holes.
20210529_160513.jpg

Use some fire bricks or steel bars to support the boiler and insert the first bushes. I just use two wire rods with hooks to repostion the boiler when hot. Or an old angle scribe..
20210529_154307.jpg

20210529_150331.jpg

Now heat the whole boiler untill the flux melts then keep the tourch fixed on the bush to be soldered, then move it slightly to the side as you dip the solder on the oposing side it shoukd wix around to the heat.
Check the sight guage bushes are in line, a little tap wile hot to straighten if needed.
20210529_150643.jpg

Let cool for a few seconds Then repostion to the next bush. Again just keep the heat on the bush area.
20210529_161046.jpg

If you put plenty of flux around the hole before heating they shoukd still be free from oxide and the bush with its load of flux is placed in while still hot.
20210529_150723.jpg

Then stand the boiler up and place the top extended bushes into position..
20210529_151056.jpg

Again just local heat with the torch and a quick dip of solder is all it takes.
A handy way to use shorter peices of solder is using a drill pin vice to save burning finger tips..
20210529_142926.jpg

And the boiler after soldering, again quench while hot then back into the acid.
20210529_161507.jpg

And the finished boiler after some pickle and polishing..
Next page.
⬇
 

darwenguy

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20210529_163042.jpg

Check all joints again..
20210529_163050.jpg

And thats ot for today.
This is the best method i have found for soldering this boiler. Ive made around 20 of these now and i know i learned from making a lot of mistakes so Hope this helps anyone thinking of making there own.
Next weeks job, il preasure test them and onto the castings for the fire box and top..
20210529_163223.jpg

Best regards.
Luke.
 

ruralearl

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Luke, That you for posting this. I have built one of Tubal Cain's Polly & planning 3 more. I have already learned a lot here. The time and effort you have expended on this is much appreciated. Best wishes, Earl
 

Zeb

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Yeah, I'll try using these methods on my build. Realized I don't have pickle and should probably pick some up. I particularly liked the explanation on the bushings, as there's a point where you have to burn a bit of flux right at the end and hope it doesn't flash away.
 

darwenguy

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Yeah, I'll try using these methods on my build. Realized I don't have pickle and should probably pick some up. I particularly liked the explanation on the bushings, as there's a point where you have to burn a bit of flux right at the end and hope it doesn't flash away.
Thanks guys.
The flux should keep the copper clean enougth to solder just dont hold a direct flame on the flux too long, then when you add the bush loaded with more flux the extra flux melts and cleans out the joint more. Also mix the paste nice and thick, even better if you leave it to dry solid onto the boiler fefore heating.
If your worried you can stop and clean and reflux for every bush if needed, just uses more flux and time.
I would recomend using some form of acid it does help lots, citric acid is usually sold in cooking stores.
Best of luck.
 
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Steamchick

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Excellent Luke. Very professional the way you present what it took me a while to achieve properly without advice. Your work is very neat, showing the care you take on every operation. I am sure you have a lot of satisfied customers.
Thanks for this! It sets the standard both for workmanship and a clear explanation.
K2
 

timo_gross

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A handy way to use shorter peices of solder is using a drill pin vice to save burning finger tips..
View attachment 126020
Hello,

I do not own a pin vise, when I saw the picture It reminded me on a TIG torch.
I had the idea to use the cap of the tig torch and a collet for the tungsten. I insertet a welding wire, same diameter as the solder wire into the collet and pushed it upside down into the cap, it seems to clamp fine for light handling.
I do not know if it is a rubbish Idea, but I will try it some time. If someone owns a taper reamer, he could try to make a taperd hole into some piece of wood, and push the Tig collet into it?
K1600_P1000896.JPG


Cheers Timo
 

Steamchick

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I simply use the trick a blacksmith taught me, to use a corner of the flame to solder the fresh stick onto the dog-end... or I have used tongs, snipe nosed pliers, or the flux application rod, if I am on the last stub of a particular alloy. Lots of pigs around that died different ways....
But a pin vice is a very useful tool for holding all sorts of small drills, jet/ nozzle reamers, or small screwdriver bits, cocktail sticks or other cleaning probes.... even pins?
K2
 

vederstein

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Great build log.

I know what you mean about machining copper. It's quite the PITA.
 

darwenguy

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Hi all.
I got most of the castings for the boilers machined this week, heres how i do it..
First the base casting.
20210603_115559.jpg

First machine the base feet flat and level.
20210603_115548.jpg

Then turn the top diameter using faceplate and clamps to hold the part..
20210603_121749.jpg

And check fit in boiler tube..
20210603_121851.jpg

Then markout and mill the fire door opening..
20210603_160214.jpg

Then drill the hold down holes in the feet..
20210604_104949.jpg

Next onto the boiler top casting. First center and drill the holes for the bushes and flue pipe.
20210603_161339.jpg

Then bore out the flue pipe hole..
20210603_164542.jpg

And check fit..
20210603_164731.jpg

Then turn the outer diameter to fit boiler tube..
20210604_110405.jpg

Next job is to fit the door casting..
Best regards.
Luke.
 

darwenguy

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Richard Hed

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Hi all.
I got most of the castings for the boilers machined this week, heres how i do it..
First the base casting.
View attachment 126276
First machine the base feet flat and level.
View attachment 126277
Then turn the top diameter using faceplate and clamps to hold the part..
View attachment 126278
And check fit in boiler tube..
View attachment 126279
Then markout and mill the fire door opening..
View attachment 126280
Then drill the hold down holes in the feet..
View attachment 126281
Next onto the boiler top casting. First center and drill the holes for the bushes and flue pipe.
View attachment 126282
Then bore out the flue pipe hole..
View attachment 126283
And check fit..
View attachment 126284
Then turn the outer diameter to fit boiler tube..
View attachment 126285
Next job is to fit the door casting..
Best regards.
Luke.
Love ur setup on the face plate, however, you seem to have a mill, why not mill that particular hole on mill?
 

darwenguy

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Love ur setup on the face plate, however, you seem to have a mill, why not mill that particular hole on mill?
Why you would use the mill?
I dont have a 22mm drill or a boring head for the mill so cant do. Plus the faceplate and clamps were already on the lathe so would have been a lot more work to setup again on the mill?
Best regards.
 

Richard Hed

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Why you would use the mill?
I dont have a 22mm drill or a boring head for the mill so cant do. Plus the faceplate and clamps were already on the lathe so would have been a lot more work to setup again on the mill?
Best regards.
Ah, of course. I thimpfk Old Tony has a videio on how to make an adjustable milling head. Forget what they are called. When I get a mill, I will have to buy one or make one as they are rather expensive but in acuality, if you have time, not difficult to make--just expensive in time.
 

Steamchick

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A boring note...
For boring cylinders, etc, I use a very simple (traditional?) design of boring tool. I take a piece of 25mm ground steel bar (or whatever you have), with a tool-bit set in a 45degree hole (could be 90 degrees) near the bottom of the rod when it is mounted in appropriate sized collets in the quill of the miller-driller. Setting is easy, as knowing the diameter of the rod, you take half (= the radius) and add to "half the bore" - which is the tool setting from centre-line. Set the dimension in the micrometer and lock it. Use the mic. as a setting gauge to set from one side of the bar to the tool tip. It is usually right to within a 0.001". So simple, and can easily be used where multiple cuts are needed to open-out a bore.
I have a few odd bars like this. Some made with centre-holes for the tail-stock centre, and holes for mounting the tool bit half-way along, so you can nip one end in the 3-jaw chuck of the lathe, the far end against the revolving tail-stock centre, and the part to be bored mounted on the saddle or cross-slide of the lathe.
A small grub screw locks the tool-bit in place.
The very stiff boring bar helps make very true, round bores, for cylinders.
K2
 

darwenguy

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Ah, of course. I thimpfk Old Tony has a videio on how to make an adjustable milling head. Forget what they are called. When I get a mill, I will have to buy one or make one as they are rather expensive but in acuality, if you have time, not difficult to make--just expensive in time.
yes tony has a great video on making one, but i think you will not find it much fun to make on a small hobby mill and lathe.
Ive just never had a need for a 'boring head' but if i did i would still choose to buy a cheep chinese one for £50 im certain there better quality than your average hobby machinist can produce and much cheeper in time and time is momey after all.
Best regards.
luke.
 

Steamchick

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Hi Luke,
I have a "boring head" - bought for similar money, but it hardly ever comes out of the box. I use the boring bars and tools made by my father and myself at various times - because they are so much stiffer, easier to set accurately using a micrometer, and easy to re-sharpen the tool bits. They may seem OK in pictures, but you do such good work, I suggest you borrow one from a friend and try-before-you-buy! £10 buys lots of different pieces of bar, some grub screws, and carbide tool rod. - And leaves £40 so you can take your missus for a drink or 3!
I can't say they don't work, but on the couple of occasions I have used mine it was to try it out and I simply wasn't impressed. It did work, but not better than a simple and stiffer (home-made) bar with tool bit. I though it was a lot more fiddle and faff to get the same result. But only my opinion.
K2
 

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