Cheap (Chinese?) Carbide Tips

Discussion in 'Tools' started by MRA, Jul 5, 2018.

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  1. Jul 10, 2018 #21

    Dubi

    Dubi

    Dubi

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    First rate post. That is exactly how it is. One thing I have noticed is no one has made a comment about using different types of coolant or cutting compounds.

    I once tapped a piece of aluminium, as a test, using paraffin and then using Tapamatic. The improvement with Tapamatic was amazing. Coolants and cutting oils make a big difference.
     
  2. Jul 10, 2018 #22

    DJP

    DJP

    DJP

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    I don't push my carbide cutters hard enough to justify coolant systems and my experience with them in big shops is that they stink. I do use a cutting oil and it smokes when things get hot on the machines. When cutting threads I use Chromatap. I bought a gallon decades ago and I need to use it up before trying something different.

    I did experiment with a mixture of equal parts kerosene, Varsol and Automatic transmission fluid. A buddy who works in aluminium says it is a good machining fluid in his production shop and inexpensive too.

    Cutting fluid is wonderful but you don't need a lot of it.

    My thoughts for the discussion.
     
  3. Jul 17, 2018 #23

    Wizard69

    Wizard69

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    Interesting discussion, most of my machining is related to production machine repair and almost all of the tooling we use is purchased from a local supplier. I have no idea where some if it comes from, could be the USA, Israel or China for all i know. How well any of it works depends upon applying the right cutter to the application. Even the coatings can be an issue as some do not work with Aluminum very well at all.

    So there is the issue of using the proper cutter for the task at hand and the equipment it will be used on. You really need to take care to make sure that the geometry, rake, coating and other parameters makes sense for the work you expect the carbide to do. An insert design for a lathe with 25 HP at the spindle doesn't make much sense on a hobby engineering lathe. In the hobby realm you need to do your research.
     
    goldstar31 likes this.
  4. Jul 17, 2018 #24

    goldstar31

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    I re-read Conrad Hoffman's excellent dissertation in his Conrad and Jeanne's Messy Basement.
    He gives a relatively clear explanation of why some of these carbide inserts are unsuitable0 as Wizard69 suggests because of lack of horse power and the 'wrong negative cutting angles'.

    Hoffman goes on to explain why an insert will not take a an almost imperseptical cut whereas a quite normal bit of his tooling will do it.

    Finally, he suggests how carbides CAN be honed to do precisely what we oldies can do with his- and sometimes ordinary carbon steel.

    Of course, it may appear as heresy to some but do recall that many of the models which are being attempted were made using hss and carbon steel tools.

    Thanks again Wizard69 for expanding the discussion.

    Me? I'm at the stage where most of the rust and whatever has been removed from my version of Dennis Chaddoch's Quorn which if read correctly , gives an insight into the first Door Westbury mill which- clears throat- made his famous v12

    Regards

    N
     
  5. Aug 10, 2018 #25

    rockets

    rockets

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    I have been using tips from Bangood after seeing them recommended on Doubleboost's Youtube channel (no affiliation to either). I have to say that they work just as well as anything else I've used. I've cut a variety of materials, they'll cut EN16, various grades of aluminium and brass without issues. Haven't had any chipped or broken edges either.

    Incidentally, I had a box of Kennametal tips which looked identical, and even said contents made in China on the box. I draw some inference from that.

    Rockets.
     
  6. Aug 10, 2018 #26

    goldstar31

    goldstar31

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    As you are more or less a newbie but with a 3 in 1 lathe, it would be a easy matter to make up a 'puck' as suggested by Hoffman.

    Thinking about materials as cutting tools, I used broken glass from WW2 bombed out houses to make 1/72nd scale models and improved safety razor blades in glass tumblers to make obeche and balsa models. One of my old associates made a Quorn t&c from solid not castings and amongst his workshop tools were things like scrap hexagon keys as lathe tools and motor cycle spoke as boring bars.

    Hoffman was merely improving the Holzapfell stuff from Maudsley days.

    You might be pleasantly surprised-- and saved a lot of money

    Regards

    Norm
     
  7. Aug 10, 2018 #27

    BIGTREV

    BIGTREV

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    I use cheap Chinese Carbide Tips, but I only do shed work(nothing to technical) and I luv em, I buy the cheapest l can find on ebay, or Aliexpress.
    Virtually everything I learnt at college in the 1970's, about speed/RPM has gone out of the window
     

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