Broken a bolt in my stud

Discussion in 'Mistakes, Blunders and Boo Boos' started by JCSteam, Sep 22, 2017.

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  1. Sep 22, 2017 #1

    JCSteam

    JCSteam

    JCSteam

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    Well looks like I've made my first major cock up. After painting some of the parts on the lathe, I then set about reassembling them, this is where my mistake happened.

    I was reassembling the change gears, I'd got them all on their studs and I was just adjusting the fit between the gears, I tightened the nuts down that's when I heard that unforgettable sound of metal snapping.

    So now I have a threaded portion in my stud, how do I get it out?? I was thinking to drill it out and then retap will this work?
     
  2. Sep 22, 2017 #2

    JCSteam

    JCSteam

    JCSteam

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    Ok sorted it! I used the broken head and carefully mated the end up, and with a bit of patients the threaded part came out enough to get my fingers on and in screw from the stud.

    When I've looked inside it looks like on reassembly I've put the wrong bolt back into the wrong stud. (They were different lengths).

    So some hex bar and a die, and i'll have a new bolt made up for it.
     
  3. Sep 23, 2017 #3

    bazmak

    bazmak

    bazmak

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    With the old lathes the threads are probably bsf or bsw and expensive or difficult to get hold of.Trying to make your own id also expensive unless
    you have all the taps and dies etc.Dont be afraid to go to std commercial
    sets and studding. Say metric and hex sock (HT 10.9 ) in cap,button,csk hd and of coarse grub screws. Where you have a worn tapped hole and if you can go up a size
     
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  4. Sep 23, 2017 #4

    goldstar31

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    I agree with the BSW/BSF normal state of affairs but I would also have the 2BA kit to replace fretted and worn fasteners.

    Really there is nothing but an abomination in putting old nuts and bolts back after a million adjustments over the centuries of abuse.

    In the 'real' world of engineering it is usually best practice to fit new bolts.- and use a torque wrench to do it.


    With impish glee, I would remind readers that Cleeve made his own socket screws. With devilish contempt, might I re-introduce the Thrupple Nut. Perhaps someone has a copy of the construction details-- LOL

    Norm
     
  5. Sep 23, 2017 #5

    JCSteam

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    Thanks Norm and Baz, I can buy taps for £2 each and dies for £3 for the smaller sizes. From Tracey tools. Just need to buy or make a tailstock holder for the dies.

    I will replace eventually, as had been proved by my experience posted above I think I need to review what sizes all the bolts are and more important what the length of the bolts are :)
     
  6. Sep 23, 2017 #6

    bazmak

    bazmak

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    I agree Norm,i have kept all my BA taps and dies but use them only where necessary. For small scale sizes where hex hds should be used and are commercially available.Where i can i go metric and Hex Sock
    Grub screws are a must,as i find are csk. Sock and button head also look ok
     
  7. Sep 24, 2017 #7

    goldstar31

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    Of course, I also have my ME series of taps and dies in 32 and 40 TPI.

    from an almost extinct Dodo

    N
     
  8. Sep 24, 2017 #8

    JCSteam

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    32 and 40 TPI are threads I'll be needing for the boiler fittings I want to make.

    I take your point on the metric threads. M5 may be getting used a lot on the as well as M6 M8 ECT.
     
  9. Feb 3, 2018 #9

    skyline1

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    It's surprising how much stuff still uses these especially here in the U.K.

    And because they are produced less they are getting really expensive

    so if you have some hang on to 'em they can really get you out of a jam sometimes.

    Regards Mark
     
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