Another newbie, hello from Erie, on Pennsylvania's 'North Coast'

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Hi all. My name is Russ. I am new to the forum, and fairly new to machining, but have been 'lurking' across some of these machining sites for a while now. Since retirement, I have become caretaker for several vintage machines, all of whom are patiently trying to teach me how they should be used. They would appreciate any help you folks could give them. I am particularly interested in Hot Air (Stirling, etc.) engines but if it is finely made of metal and it moves (well, usually whether if moves or it does not), it draws my interest. Thanks for reading. Hopefully, someday I might make a meaningful contribution.
 

minh-thanh

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Hello Russ !
Welcome to the forum .
Stirling engines / flame eater engines are very interesting engines to build - building it is a struggle between airtightness and friction
Good luck with your future projects !
 

johnmcc69

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Welcome Russ from your neighborhood!

Great bunch of folks here. Would like to see pic's of the machinery you are "babysitting" & future projects you may get into.

John
 
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Here is what the mill looked like in the auction where I bought it. I call it the 'General Grant'. Extra credit to anyone who figures out the connection. I had to partially disassemble it (removing the head, overarm, turret, and table) to move it from my garage to the shop. That was to say the least, somewhat stressful. But it is mostly back together now (X powerfeed is still not reinstalled) and seems to run well. It is 3phase so I have a rotary phase converter.

-rgs
 

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Richard Hed

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Here is what the mill looked like in the auction where I bought it. I call it the 'General Grant'. Extra credit to anyone who figures out the connection. I had to partially disassemble it (removing the head, overarm, turret, and table) to move it from my garage to the shop. That was to say the least, somewhat stressful. But it is mostly back together now (X powerfeed is still not reinstalled) and seems to run well. It is 3phase so I have a rotary phase converter.

-rgs
Oh, I love that, I love that. General Grant. I live in Grant County, named after Ulyss. I am wondering if you have a "Sheridan" or a "Sherman" to keep him company?
 
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Hi Russ, Welcome!
Hi Richard - perhaps you can explain the references to Gen. Grant? Was he one of the renegades who decided to have a war with the Home Country? - Or was he a rebel who fought against his own country? - Perhaps he was on the side that wanted to tax the Southern lot to bankruptcy?
I'm sure you can explain the link to a milling machine? (We English don't know much about the internal wars in the colonies (I assume one lot didn't want to pay taxes to support the other lot?) especially those who claimed independence and stopped paying taxes to us! (That's what the tea debacle was all about, wasn't it?). Maybe operating the Miller "taxes" the brains?
K2
 

Richard Hed

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Hi Russ, Welcome!
Hi Richard - perhaps you can explain the references to Gen. Grant? Was he one of the renegades who decided to have a war with the Home Country? - Or was he a rebel who fought against his own country? - Perhaps he was on the side that wanted to tax the Southern lot to bankruptcy?
I'm sure you can explain the link to a milling machine? (We English don't know much about the internal wars in the colonies (I assume one lot didn't want to pay taxes to support the other lot?) especially those who claimed independence and stopped paying taxes to us! (That's what the tea debacle was all about, wasn't it?). Maybe operating the Miller "taxes" the brains?
K2
Not a prob. General Grant was the greatest general in the the American civil war. He took three armies prisoner and in the doing of it, at leaST in the Western theater of the war, made it look like child's play. By the end of the war, he commanded more than 1,000,000 men. He was the first Leiutenant General since Washington and eventually he became the first five star general ever. Duiring the nazi regime, the German army studied Grant's work, NOT general Lee's! The German attitude was that ANY competent general could do what Lee did IN DEFENCE. Notice that Lee's OFFENSIVE attempts all failed because of his inability to understand what he was doing. What Grant did was very Napoleonic. Put Napoleon up against Grant, and it would be a tie or Grant would win. President Grant is on our $50 bill.

The stories about how Grant came to find Sheridan are almost funny. His right hand man Sherman, some people claim was a better general than Grant, however, Sherman even said he would not have done what Grant did at Vicksburg because he thot it would not work. Vicksburg technique is exactly what the Germans did in WWII--divide and conquer, destroy in detail, keep small armies apart and cut them up individually.

So . . . our new friend with the Cincinnati mill named General Grant, which I like very much, I thot maybe he had a couple other 'generals' to keep General Grant company. BTW, there are MANY counties in the USA named 'Grant'.

The war did not start out as a taxation problem, it started out as the North, having more people in congress, managed to force the South to sell their cotton to the north at a lower price than the south could get from selling to Britain. Really, it was only an excuse for a hothead from South Carolina to get SC to secede from the Union. BAAAAD choice--no-one, at that time, had any real clear idea what Lincoln was like.
 
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Richard Hed

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Here is what the mill looked like in the auction where I bought it. I call it the 'General Grant'. Extra credit to anyone who figures out the connection. I had to partially disassemble it (removing the head, overarm, turret, and table) to move it from my garage to the shop. That was to say the least, somewhat stressful. But it is mostly back together now (X powerfeed is still not reinstalled) and seems to run well. It is 3phase so I have a rotary phase converter.

-rgs
I managed to get a mill last year in which I still have not got it running--slowly slowly slowly getting it together. The ram would not move as it had not been moved for many hyears and it varnishized whatever lubricant was on the ways. I had to use an 8 ton jack to get it to move. Got that off, cleaned and re-lubed and back together, but did not have 3PH power. Just managed to get a VFD (what little miracles those VFDs are and CHEAP compared to the alternatives). Next I have to wire my shop for the power and then I will be able to see if the motor is good.
 

JGT

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Hi all. My name is Russ. I am new to the forum, and fairly new to machining, but have been 'lurking' across some of these machining sites for a while now. Since retirement, I have become caretaker for several vintage machines, all of whom are patiently trying to teach me how they should be used. They would appreciate any help you folks could give them. I am particularly interested in Hot Air (Stirling, etc.) engines but if it is finely made of metal and it moves (well, usually whether if moves or it does not), it draws my interest. Thanks for reading. Hopefully, someday I might make a meaningful contribution.
Russ,

Great to have you on board. I also live on PA's North Coast. JGT
 
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Oh, I love that, I love that. General Grant. I live in Grant County, named after Ulyss. I am wondering if you have a "Sheridan" or a "Sherman" to keep him company?
Well, sort of. My 1941 Craftsman 'Mohawk' drill press is 'The Chief', the 1941 South Bend 9C is 'Shultzy', the 50's era? (not sure of the date on that one) Atlas MFC mini-horizontal mill is 'Archie'. The '67 Rockwell 6" belt sander and the '90 something Rockwell Delta band saw (wood saw, but will be converted for metal) are just the 'big sander' and the 'vertical band saw'. I guess I ran out of names for those. You guys are close on the connection between Grant and Cincinnati. Just have to saddle up and keep at it!
 

Richard Hed

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Well, sort of. My 1941 Craftsman 'Mohawk' drill press is 'The Chief', the 1941 South Bend 9C is 'Shultzy', the 50's era? (not sure of the date on that one) Atlas MFC mini-horizontal mill is 'Archie'. The '67 Rockwell 6" belt sander and the '90 something Rockwell Delta band saw (wood saw, but will be converted for metal) are just the 'big sander' and the 'vertical band saw'. I guess I ran out of names for those. You guys are close on the connection between Grant and Cincinnati. Just have to saddle up and keep at it!
Wasn't Ulyss stationed there for a while in the 50's?
 
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Wasn't Ulyss stationed there for a while in the 50's?
Hmmm. I don't know about the various places Ulysses Grant was stationed.
As an aside, since this is not the right venue, I'll leave it that I disagree with some of the explanations given for causes leading to the Civil War, in the reponse to the questions from our friend from Britain, itself a place with a somewhat fractious history of internal and external strife.
 

Richard Hed

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Hmmm. I don't know about the various places Ulysses Grant was stationed.
As an aside, since this is not the right venue, I'll leave it that I disagree with some of the explanations given for causes leading to the Civil War, in the reponse to the questions from our friend from Britain, itself a place with a somewhat fractious history of internal and external strife.
OK, OK, I remembers now--Cincinnati was Ulysses warhorse.
 

Richard Hed

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Well, sort of. My 1941 Craftsman 'Mohawk' drill press is 'The Chief', the 1941 South Bend 9C is 'Shultzy', the 50's era? (not sure of the date on that one) Atlas MFC mini-horizontal mill is 'Archie'. The '67 Rockwell 6" belt sander and the '90 something Rockwell Delta band saw (wood saw, but will be converted for metal) are just the 'big sander' and the 'vertical band saw'. I guess I ran out of names for those. You guys are close on the connection between Grant and Cincinnati. Just have to saddle up and keep at it!
You could call the Rockwell "General Thomas" as he was the "Rock of Chicamauga"
 

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