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  1. GreenTwin

    Valve Gear Design for Steam Engines - My approach

    Another very good old book about steam engines. https://archive.org/details/ahandbookonstea00haedgoog/page/n6/mode/2up
  2. GreenTwin

    Valve Gear Design for Steam Engines - My approach

    I actually found a paragraph in one of the old books I was browsing, and have promptly lost it again. It mentioned a Frenchman who patented a D-style valve in the late 1700's. The original steam and exhaust valves were typically located at the ends of the steam cylinder. The early D-valves were...
  3. GreenTwin

    Valve Gear Design for Steam Engines - My approach

    Here is another good steam book. https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_iH45AQAAMAAJ/page/n3/mode/2up
  4. GreenTwin

    Valve Gear Design for Steam Engines - My approach

    This is one of the better illustrated old books on steam engines. It is shocking how complex the old steam engines became over 100 (+) years of evolution. The very best minds in academia devoted entire lifetimes to studying them, and writing books about them. Steam engine design ruled supreme...
  5. GreenTwin

    Anvil Fever

    Here is a very good old pattern book that covers how to make patterns for all sorts of things. https://ia902606.us.archive.org/30/items/americanpatterns00mcca/americanpatterns00mcca.pdf
  6. GreenTwin

    Anvil Fever

    There was an article that I have seen, which illustrates how lathe beds were cast, and it seems like they used a similar method as I show above, since there is a window in the top of lathe beds. I can't find the article unfortunately, but if I find it, I will post it. .
  7. GreenTwin

    Valve Gear Design for Steam Engines - My approach

    Here is the white paper I was referring to. I don't pretend to understand it all, but I find it interesting. https://www.advanced-steam.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Measuring-Steam-Engine-Performance.pdf
  8. GreenTwin

    Anvil Fever

    For the sake of discussion, I will think through how I would mold this part, without using a corebox. Jason's coreboxes are admirable work to say the least, but for those who don't want to make or use coreboxes, here is an alternate method. I would make two pattern halves, using a 3D printer...
  9. GreenTwin

    Hi from Pembrokeshire in Wales

    Welcome Chris. I went through that same exercise in 2006. Quite a chore to say the least, but it got me started doing my own machining and engine building hobby work. My background is a power engineer, but many technical backgrounds are helpful in this hobby basically because they gives a...
  10. GreenTwin

    Anvil Fever

    Yes, very good point about coreboxes, and having a foundry make multiple castings. I pretty much work in a vacuum in my backyard foundry, often with one-off castings. The three green twin photos I used were all skewed, and so it was a bit tricky to find some reasonable dimensions, but it can be...
  11. GreenTwin

    Anvil Fever

    Yes, I agree. The steel I have heard about in the good anvils is legendary, as is the bounce test. Unfortunately steel is in the real of induction furnaces, and a large knowledge of metalurgy. Nice forging you have there ! .
  12. GreenTwin

    Valve Gear Design for Steam Engines - My approach

    The Brits used compressed air for locomotive brakes, and Westinghouse came up with the vacuum air brake system ? so that loss of pressure would automatically stop the train? Check me on that. I distinctly recall riding a steam train when I was young, and wondering what the device was on the...
  13. GreenTwin

    Anvil Fever

    After thinking about Jason's method for extruding out extra material, and then cutting back to a machined dimension, I would find this approach tedious, if not difficult. I don't necessarily use the same amount of machining allowance everywhere, and an additive process seems far more easy than...
  14. GreenTwin

    Anvil Fever

    I agree this is a good idea. I think a drop-in logo would be ideal, although as I said, the flat part around the lettering would have to be filled/puddled with something to smooth out the 3D printed lines. I made up a plaque for FIRE, and now the date is wrong for use at future FIRE events...
  15. GreenTwin

    Anvil Fever

    As far as making core boxes as you have done, I am thinking all that work is totally unnecessary, and wasted effort......not to be critical of your method, but just thinking outloud. Sometimes the use of coreboxes centers around the type of molding sand used, and if greensand or petrobond is...
  16. GreenTwin

    Anvil Fever

    I could see where that could be done, but my approach to creating a 3D model for an engine is to first find some photos of an old engine, then pull those photos into AutoCad, trace over the raster images to create some basic geometry, pull that geometry into Solidworks, and extrude the basic...
  17. GreenTwin

    Anvil Fever

    I was considering a heated enclosure for my printer, but was warned that I could overheat the power supply and electronic module. I think a non-heated enclosure would help keep any drafts away from the heated bed (my printer bed is heated). I will probably just make a wood frame, and wrap some...
  18. GreenTwin

    Building a Mini Iron Melting Furnace

    My very first furnace (used to melt aluminum only) was just a stack of insulating or non-insulating hard fire bricks. Insulating fire bricks will begin to crack in a freestanding form, but this worked ok just to try melting some aluminum without much effort expended on construction of a furnace.
  19. GreenTwin

    Building a Mini Iron Melting Furnace

    I have seen a lot of heated discussions about what the best burner and furnace type is. The best burner/furnace is the one that allows you to cast what you want for a reasonable amount of money, with reasonable longevity. The trend these days for aluminum melts is the ceramic blanket style...
  20. GreenTwin

    Valve Gear Design for Steam Engines - My approach

    No problem, I am like a sponge; I read and absorb anything and everything that gets posted. The more I read, the more I learn. The more I learn, the more things I can do. I enjoy reading what others post as much or more as I do my creating own posts/threads. You will never hear me complain...
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