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Old 02-24-2013, 10:02 PM   #1
jixxerbill
 
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Default learning cad

I want to learn cad, but whats the best/easiest to learn... i have downloaded several trial ones over the years but learning curve seemed steep.. It will still be steep but i really want to learn it for eventual use in cnc machine... A little background about myself. I took drafting in high school, back when it was pencil and paper (1984).. Since then I have worked construction and being able to read and understand prints has been invaluable... I currently have the turbocad trial version and i can sketch out parts in paper mode (takes a while lol) but in model mode i cant get zoomed in far enough....Turbocad web sight has a tutorial video for sale .. I was wondering if anyone had used it before...Thanks Bill



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Old 02-24-2013, 10:11 PM   #2
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I want to learn cad, but whats the best/easiest to learn... i have downloaded several trial ones over the years but learning curve seemed steep.. It will still be steep but i really want to learn it for eventual use in cnc machine... A little background about myself. I took drafting in high school, back when it was pencil and paper (1984).. Since then I have worked construction and being able to read and understand prints has been invaluable... I currently have the turbocad trial version and i can sketch out parts in paper mode (takes a while lol) but in model mode i cant get zoomed in far enough....Turbocad web sight has a tutorial video for sale .. I was wondering if anyone had used it before...Thanks Bill

are you a student
if yes you can have a free CAD student version from auto desk


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Old 02-24-2013, 10:11 PM   #3
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I use Solid Works 2012 and started using it just by going through the included tutorials. It really is the easiest thing to use once you get your head round it. It's expensive to buy, but if you know how and where...........

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Old 02-24-2013, 10:24 PM   #4
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Luc, i wish i was a student. I been out of school for almost 30 years..
Woodster, ill check out solid works. thanks..

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Old 02-24-2013, 10:35 PM   #5
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Luc, i wish i was a student. I been out of school for almost 30 years..
Woodster, ill check out solid works. thanks..
It's expensive to buy, but if you know how and where...........


the same thing can be done with CAD with CAD I can supplie you with 3000 pages manual for free cheers
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Old 02-24-2013, 10:41 PM   #6
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check out alibre CAD. IIRC a free trial download is available then the licence for the Personal Edition PE is about $200. Solid works is great if: 1) you are a professional and can afford the licensing fee because you earn your living from it. 2) you are a teacher and get a free licence .3) are a student and get a cheap licence.
alibre is relatively affordable for the rest of us. the beauty of Alibre is you draw a part in 3-d then in few minutes it will make dimensioned 2 d drawings. yes there is a learning curve.
Tin

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Old 02-24-2013, 10:50 PM   #7
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Bill,

I started with pencil and paper, then AutoCAD, then Mechanical Desktop, then Pro-E, and finally ended up using SolidWorks. I now teach several CAD courses that are part of a Mechanical Engineering Technology program and have seen every level of CAD student cross my path.

I have never used TurboCAD but if you will be using it for 3D CAD design then let me at least throw out some comments that you may find helpful.

Regardless of the program you choose, if it's 3D, the rules of 3D CAD design are almost all the same.

1. Choose a sketching plane (Top, Front, or Right)
2. Draw a sketch (a rectangle, circle, any shape)
3. Create a Feature (Extrude, Revolve, and so on)

The last think you should do is give up! Learning CAD can be frustrating at first but the more tutorials you can do and the more practice the easier it will become. If you love Model Engineering...knowing 3D CAD will open up a whole new world for you.

I am currently teaching a gentleman that is more than twice my age...he never turned on a computer until he entered my CAD-1 class. He is doing just fine and loving it.

Best of luck to which ever CAD program you end up with.

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Old 02-24-2013, 11:47 PM   #8
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I just looked at some tutorials on that alibre Tin was talking about and it seems like its a little better than others.. it actually makes changes to a drawing when you change the dimension of a line or circle...etc.. I wish there were tutorials that walked you thru how to make a part and let you do it along with the tutorial...Then get more and more detailed as it goes along....I guess thats why i only lasted 2 years in college ! I can read all day long and that evening if you ask me what i read i will not remember any of it... But if you show me one time I will recall 80 to 90 percent of it...Its a learning problem i have i guess.. There is a name for it,,, slow maybe ?? lol Thanks everyone for all the great responses....Bill

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Old 02-24-2013, 11:57 PM   #9
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Bill

If you use Skype I can walk you through Alibre CAD using there share screen feature.
I spent 3 hrs yesterday with my friend in England working with Alibre.

Dave skype name dave.sohlstrom

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Old 02-25-2013, 12:14 AM   #10
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Hello,
I have used various CAD programs at school, work, and home over the last 25 years. At work it's AutoCAD (we do facilities work). At home, it's TurboCAD v19pro. I have used TurboCAD for about 10 years or so and have enjoyed it. For the price, it is very powerful and does not require a yearly subscription to keep using it. I have never used the TurboCAD tutorials, but can highly recommend Don Cheke's TurboCAD tips. He has a HUGE amount of info available on his web site and does not charge for it. The TurboCAD forums at TurboCAD.com are also very friendly and helpful. Don can be found on the forums and at http://www.textualcreations.ca/Don_Cheke's_TurboCAD_Tips.html

I have never used Alibre, but understand it is easy to use.

TurboCAD has several different "levels" available from simple 2D design/drafting to full-blown solid modeling. The first thing to decide in any CAD package is what do you want to do with it? Is is more importante to draft in 2D and produce a usable drawing or sketch, or do you want to produce 3D renderings of a full project?

Todd.



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