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Old 04-10-2011, 08:53 PM   #1
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Default Homemade cutting oil???

Reading the boring head tread I saw that lard was mentioned and as lard(at least the soft stuff) isn't something one finds in stores around my parts(only solid blocks of coco fat for baking).

What I have found works well for pretty much anything(still use rtd for expensive hss cutters) is the cheapest vegetable oil I can find with some lamp oil mixed in(does smoke though).

Are there any other homemade cutting fluids out there that anyone are using?

Recipes, anyone



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Old 04-10-2011, 09:13 PM   #2
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Default Re: Homemade cutting oil???

I've tried mixtures of cooking oils on steel but have found that they tend to gum things up. I have brushes that have set solid with cooking oils (rapeseed/sunflower etc.). The other problem is that they tend to get thrown around with the cutter or work (mill or lathe), and then the droplets take up resident amongst the swarf making it very difficult to remove (after a few weeks when you get round to cleaning the awkward inaccessible bits).

Lard is just bacon fat (actually pig fat rendered and filtered twice). I've found it to be best for cutting, and even rustproofing the surface if you don't clean it off afterwards. FWIW I just brush it on. If its very cold just microwave it to soften. You can just see it liquefy at the edge of the cut where the heat is. Downside is that it makes a chip frying smell, and also imparts a very slight tint to the metal.

So next time you have a bacon sarnie (or a pork joint), save the fat, and try it (+ you get a good excuse for a sarnie).

Best Regards

picclock



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Old 04-11-2011, 12:43 AM   #3
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Default Re: Homemade cutting oil???

Mastermaker,
You've been given good advice about animal fat is good for a variety of reasons and it works very well with reaming, Sometimes it will still do better than the latest formulated synthetic snake oil invented. But after that? I really have to question why? If your a cutting oil chemist then yeah go for it. But if not, Your willing to risk your expensive equipment and cutting tools with home concoctions? I do use lard while reaming and your of course free to do what you want. But for myself I'll stick with the 21st century. Rancid, stinking cutting material doesn't work well with the normal cuts and scrapes that are part of any shop day. That salt added to your average package of bacon really doesn't help with rust issues either.

Pete

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Old 04-11-2011, 02:12 AM   #4
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Default Re: Homemade cutting oil???

Pete,
You make a good point about the salt mixed in with pork fat, and the bacteria associated with using animal fats.

However, your delivery tasted more like vinegar.

Perhaps you could be a little more diplomatic in your responses, please.

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Old 04-11-2011, 04:17 PM   #5
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Default Re: Homemade cutting oil???

I haven't found it to be that gummy so it is possible that adding the lamp oil(which is purified kerosene) helps in this department as I usually add enough of it to make the vegetable(soy I think) oil significantly less viscous.



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Originally Posted by picclock
I've tried mixtures of cooking oils on steel but have found that they tend to gum things up. I have brushes that have set solid with cooking oils (rapeseed/sunflower etc.). The other problem is that they tend to get thrown around with the cutter or work (mill or lathe), and then the droplets take up resident amongst the swarf making it very difficult to remove (after a few weeks when you get round to cleaning the awkward inaccessible bits).

Lard is just bacon fat (actually pig fat rendered and filtered twice). I've found it to be best for cutting, and even rustproofing the surface if you don't clean it off afterwards. FWIW I just brush it on. If its very cold just microwave it to soften. You can just see it liquefy at the edge of the cut where the heat is. Downside is that it makes a chip frying smell, and also imparts a very slight tint to the metal.

So next time you have a bacon sarnie (or a pork joint), save the fat, and try it (+ you get a good excuse for a sarnie).

Best Regards

picclock

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Old 04-11-2011, 04:46 PM   #6
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Default Re: Homemade cutting oil???

I use tapping fluid for cutting steel.

Is this a bad thing? It seems to work fine, but with all the alternatives is there any reason that tapping fluid shouldn't be used?

Kel

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Old 04-11-2011, 05:48 PM   #7
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Default Re: Homemade cutting oil???

I use cool tool II. It's a biodegradable cutting and tapping fluid. It's pretty cheap too, but in order to stretch it's legs I usually use 1 part Cool Tool, 1 part 20W motor oil and 2 to 4 parts WD-40. Works nicely as cutting and tapping fluid, but doesn't act as a coolant much. A pint of Cool Tool, a Quart of 20W and a Quart of WD-40 will last you forever and cost very little.

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Old 04-11-2011, 06:08 PM   #8
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Default Re: Homemade cutting oil???

Quote:
I use tapping fluid for cutting steel.
Kel, I do too; Can't say that it's bad, except that it gets a bit expensive. It gives me very good results - usually I rough out to near size dry on the lathe, and then just use the tapping fluid for the last two passes, except when screw cutting. It also works a treat for parting off. The specific tapping fluid I use also works for reaming and drilling, and makes copper a pleasure to turn/mill/drill. It's not suitable for aluminium though - for that I use methylated spirits (rubbing alcohol) or kerosene for drilling and tapping and parting off. I do all other machining on ali completely dry.

Like they say, if it works, it's good to go.

Regards, Arnold
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Old 04-11-2011, 06:17 PM   #9
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Default Re: Homemade cutting oil???

I use tranmission fluid and power steering fluid mix it all up. it works great and on alum it really works good too. need a steady drip with steel but it works for me and its cheap to.

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Old 04-11-2011, 06:41 PM   #10
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Default Re: Homemade cutting oil???

Whilst I don't use it myself - I know people who use old engine oil (the blacker the better - the free carbon is a HP lubricant).

I once worked in an automatic lathe shop and they all used old motor oil (the owner was notoriously "cheap") for machining steel.

Messy but cheap - they give the stuff away.

As one old guy said - if it was good enough for my motor last time it was used - its good enough.

Ken



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