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Old 10-24-2017, 09:26 PM   #11
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If buying a used lathe try to avoid one with flat ways. You can't do accurate work if the ways are worn. Ways wear more closest to the chuck. If you adjust the carriage gibs to fit the least worn part of the bed there will be slack when the carriage is near the chuck. On a V way machine you can do accurate work even if the ways are worn. The carriage is guided by the V an will have no play.

There should be South Bend, Logan, Sheldon, and other used machines available. Parts should not be a big issue. I had my 10K South Bend since the 1970's and I bought it used. The only part I had to replace was the flat belt. These older quality lathes were built well and almost never break down. Repair parts for many out of production lathes are available in eBay. You are getting into machining. You could make many of your own repair parts.


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Old 10-25-2017, 03:28 AM   #12
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Quite frankly all the Chinese made machines from Busy Bee, Grizzly, King, Precision Matthews, Bolton, etc are the same basic machine, some may be slightly better than others due to better on site QC / QA but it is a crap shoot. That's the issue - buy from China or go for something that is 3 to 10 times the price - i.e. a new Standard Modern is made in Canada but will run you $22k for a 13" lathe https://www.kbctools.ca/products/MAC...HES/10137.aspx

KBC carry the King brand, but really its the same lathes as Grizzly and BusyBee rebranded again.

Grizzly may be your best bet. They are the largest distributor of these hobby size machines so they will at least have some pull with the factories they buy from in terms of demanding quality or no repeat business....

Good luck - your only other option is used - and that is a whole different game.

Mike


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Old 10-26-2017, 01:51 AM   #13
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Thanks for all the advice. I guess Iím leaning towards the grizzly G0768Z lathe and the G0758Z mill. If one of you guys have a few minutes could you visit the grizzly site and review these pieces of equipment and give me your thoughts. I know itís a lot to ask but I would appreciate some who knows what to look for give me their opinion before I pull out my cheque book. Thanks.
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Old 12-12-2017, 09:10 PM   #14
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Iím certainly no expert, but after much research, Iíve decided to go with the Tormach PCNC 770 with the Rapid Turn lathe accessory (turns the mill into a lathe). For my project, the smaller/cheaper PCNC 440 would be suitable, but it doesnít support the full line of accessories available for the PCNC 770. My needs may be different than most as I plan to build two engines, 50cc and 125cc, and want to be able to do low volume production once the prototype is tested and the design optimized. Iíve been really impressed with the work I see in YouTube videos, and really appreciate all the training opportunities and videos provided by Tormach. Note I plan to be working 7075-T6 aluminum as well as Maraging 350 steel (in the soft annealed state prior to heat treatment). My sonís a mechanical engineer with hands on machining experience, and these Tormach tools are the cheapest that meet my needs and earned his approval.
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Old 12-12-2017, 10:33 PM   #15
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I would advise against an all in one unit.Its not much more expensive to buy a lathe and mill. Its bliss to have both units working together with a lot less setup time.You ate forevever changing setups with all in ones or lathe V/slide
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Old 12-12-2017, 11:13 PM   #16
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If/when you go to buy a new lathe, compare prices for the same machine from different suppliers..

There is a reason for this, most box shifters have their machines made down to a price, so 50 bucks difference between suppliers can usually mean that the higher priced one is built to a better standard, as I found on my lathe. When the slides were removed for modding, I noticed that all the ways had been hand scraped and lubrication channels milled into the ways, these are not noticeable just looking at the machine, but it does give you a feeling of security because extra care had been taken with my machine, and it has definitely satisfied all my needs.

If/when you are looking for a milling machine, as already stated, get one with an R8 spindle, plus also, if you can afford it, get a machine with a knee. I doubt if you will get much more throat, but you will gain better control of the three axis, plus it will be easy to fit power feeds and DRO's to all the axis, maybe at a later date.

With regards to toolholding on the mill, have a look at spindle collets rather than ER ones. They both cost about the same price, but if a higher job comes along, you will automatically lose 3" throat because that is how far the collet holder sticks out of the spindle, whereas spindle collets are flush with the end of the spindle and you don't lose any throat depth..

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Old 12-13-2017, 02:28 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bazmak View Post
I would advise against an all in one unit.Its not much more expensive to buy a lathe and mill. Its bliss to have both units working together with a lot less setup time.You ate forevever changing setups with all in ones or lathe V/slide
Good point. I hadn't considered setup time, only shop floor space.
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Old 12-13-2017, 09:56 PM   #18
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Been there ,done that.You can guarantee that when you want the lathe the
mill ,is in the way and vice verser.My shop is only 5 ft x 14ft but i still have room for 2 lathes and a mill.Its great to be on the lathe and just switch to the mill an d back again etc.I have learned my lesson


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