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Old 12-08-2017, 03:07 PM   #11
deverett
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Originally Posted by ACHiPo View Post
Thanks for the ideas. I may start on a wobbler.

This finger engine looks like a decent starting place as well as a fun thing to display. I'll start noodling on it and dump it into Fusion 360. Should be fun and a chance to practice.
Finger engines are indeed a bit of fun - simple to make and also as an 'executive's desk toy!
If making one, you need to make sure you get the correct ratios of the cranks. I've tried to upload a couple of sketches showing the proportions that work, but for some reason I can't get the pics to upload. Send me a PM with email address and I'll get them to you that way.
The sketches are thanks to John Bogstandard.

Dave
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Old 12-08-2017, 05:38 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deverett View Post
Finger engines are indeed a bit of fun - simple to make and also as an 'executive's desk toy!
If making one, you need to make sure you get the correct ratios of the cranks. I've tried to upload a couple of sketches showing the proportions that work, but for some reason I can't get the pics to upload. Send me a PM with email address and I'll get them to you that way.
The sketches are thanks to John Bogstandard.

Dave
The Emerald Isle
Dave,
I sent a PM with my email.

Thanks!
Evan


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Old Yesterday, 02:13 AM   #13
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You haven't mentioned your metal working back ground, but if starting from scratch do realize it takes a bit of time for the skills to come together. It is common in the trades to build these skills by making tools that you will use the rest of your career.

Now for model engineering you might not want to make some of the tools a student machinist might make. However there will be a need to make tools at some point and such tools are often low cost practice compared to an engine. There are many books, web sites and other sources of information on shop build up. An example here is THE MODEL ENGINEERS WORKSHOP MANUAL by Geo. H. Thomas. I give this as an example though many other possibilities exist.

The point here is that some tools you can buy others you have to make. So not only is tool making good practice, at some point you will have to make a tool, a jig or fixture to make an engine. It kinda goes with the territory, so starting out it makes sense to spend time skills building with tool construction.
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Originally Posted by ACHiPo View Post
Thanks for the ideas. I may start on a wobbler.



This finger engine looks like a decent starting place as well as a fun thing to display.
Exactly!

Making something that is both fun and quick gets the desire to advance going.

Quote:

I'll start noodling on it and dump it into Fusion 360. Should be fun and a chance to practice.

Practice is the key. You don't want to be machining an expensive casting you first day behind a lathe. That is why making tools is so useful and why bar stock engines are good place to build skills.
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Old Yesterday, 03:01 PM   #14
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Wizard,
I’ve got quite a bit of peripheral knowledge and experience, but limited machining experience. It may be more than you wanted to know, but here goes...

I “owned” a bike shop from the ages of 9 to 18 (took over my parent’s garage)—buying junk bikes, stripping them down, repainting them with rattle cans, putting them back together and selling them. I also repaired bikes. When I was 15 I built a frame from Reynolds 531 tubing. I taught myself to file lugs, notch tubing, and silver braze. A neighbor across the street was a tool maker for GM which is where I was introduced to heli-arc welding for aluminum. He had a complete shop in a garage behind his house, but I was only able to glimpse in there a couple times. Another neighbor owned a tool and die shop that I visited a few times. I remember being fascinated thinking about tools that make measurement tools to make tools (kinda like standing between two mirrors and seein multiple shrinking perspectives).

I got a degree in materials science, but focused on semiconductor processing rather than “heat it and beat it” metallurgy (but had all the basic coursework). One of my professors specialized in tribology—I didn’t take any classes on the subject, but went to a couple seminars and was intrigued with what happened between two metals—cutting, welding, rubbing—and how lubricants work at a molecular level. I never acted on the intrigue, just filed it away for later.

Fast forward to present day, and I have the space and means to have a shop. I first outfitted it with woodworking tools, as for many years I was frustrated to not have the space or money to have equipment to do precise machining of wood, instead teaching myself to use hand tools to build and create wood furniture.

I pulled the trigger on a bucket list item—building an ERA 427 AC Cobra. While that’s in progress, I bought a used Superformance to relearn how to work on cars. I started adding to my tool collection as I figured out how to repair things that vibrated off or broke. I realized that while I’d read a lot of Hot Rod magazines when I was a kid, I didn’t know much about working on high performance cars and didn’t have the right tools. I also realized that it would be nice to know how to machine stuff for the cars—an excuse to get more into machining.

I’d always wanted to learn more about metalworking, however, but don’t have the time to take classes. I went back to my roots and just dove in, picking up a 10x31 Logan lathe, a 4x6 HF bandsaw, a Miller MIG welder, and a collection of layout and measuring tools. I want a mill, but haven’t decided what’s best for my needs.

That’s pretty much my background and where I’m going. I do want to make a few tools—lathe cutter height gauge, die holder, convex/concave cutting tool, etc., but I thought an executive toy might be a good learning exercise as well.

AC
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Old Today, 01:53 PM   #15
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Hi ACHiPo !
some videos " How a Wobbler engine works "
http://www.steves-workshop.co.uk/ste...impleoscil.htm
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" Nothing is too small to know, and nothing too big to attempt."
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Old Today, 02:57 PM   #16
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Minh Thanh,
Thanks! These help me visualize what's going on.

I did make it out to the shop yesterday, but focused on machining an 8" x 1/2" copper disk for a display I'm making. It machined like taffy! Got it round and faced off, but will need to finish it with sand paper--I don't have the tools or skill to machine pure copper at this point. I was pretty pleased with myself that I was even able to figure out how to mount the disk to my faceplate and get a tool to reach (had to rotate my compound to be 90 to my cross slide to be able to reach). Need to center drill it and polish it up and I'll be good to go.


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