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Old 08-03-2016, 09:31 PM   #31
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In my earlier posting, I reconditioned a friend's ML7 for- I think 25 or 50. The bed had about 6thous removed and I cleaned up the inner saddle and in my spare evenings, had the thing running in a week. This ties in with the late David Lammas who did much the same using a piece of plate glass and a scraper made from a file and tempered in the deep freeze. the account is in ME some where.

It was a ML2 or 4- I forget but I did something similar to another ML2 which had made Northumbrian small pipes.

So far, the cost is trifling and with tongue in cheek, a tin of engineer's blue the only additional outlay.

With advancing age and very demanding family commitments -which have yet to be resolved, I got the bed of my Myford Super7 slideways ground- at the price quoted by the then Myford factory for 200. The under saddle was worn and for an additional 50, the Turcite was added.

Today, for a bit of occupational therapy, I've been Mig/Mag welding. I wanted a break from the continuing 'Sole executor, sole beneficiary ' lark following the death of my wife in September last.

Incidentally, I'm not an engineer or whatever and still quite capable of doing the simpler tasks which arise in comparison to the real demands of life.

That is what I achieved and regarded it at no great thing to get overly troubled. It's a hobby- no more.

Regards

Norman


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Old 08-04-2016, 06:43 AM   #32
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Thanks for the advice Norman. Its good to know that the restoration of classic iron can be achieved with hand techniques.

On the grinding front I have my doubts that I will not manage to get ways reground in NZ for around NZD400. My instincts tell my i wouldnt see much if any change from NZD1,000. But perhaps I'm being a bit pessimistic.

I had a bit of hunt about through the MEW index for restoration projects on lathes and didnt have much luck. I guess that those articles are in ME which I dont have a subscription to.

Yes its a hobby and one I am chomping at the bit to get into properly.

Cheers,
J.


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Old 08-04-2016, 07:50 AM   #33
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Greetings J.
The short answer is Yes and No so might I explain? There are quite a few articles in MEW( which I have on HD) but I recall a never ending series in Model Engineer over the centuries. I have only a few.

Surprisingly, this topic comes up here- on the hour and half hour and someone kindly suggested to readers sources of information such as Machine Tool Reconditioning by Connolly and one on alignment of tools by Georg Schlesinger. Both are invaluable as they make the distinction between those who think that they are experts and those who are. Regardless of whether you will eventually buy new or put up with old, both books are worth downloading and keeping on your 'bookshelf'

Connolly deals with a classic situation where a worn machine tool is restored by machining the worn parts and then scraping them. Not lapping as you mentioned earlier. One scrapes to a known reference . None of this silly lark of lapping to make things curved again!

The only lapping is the three surface plates to create references . Have I done it? NO, life is too short but one should understand the principles.

However since Connolly, two things have happened. Let me try to explain. A decent slideways grinder today will create perfectly acceptable machine tools. A good machine shop will still have guys who can still scrape. The two things do go together!

However the days of the old guys with glasses like the bottoms of Newcastle Brown Ale bottles and a left arm caked in scraped cast iron dust are over and one can have the choice of building up worn parts by either Turcite sheet or gooey plastics such as Devcon.
Somewhere there is a fine article in Model Engineer about the use of materials such as Devcon. Sadly, I had to destroy much of earlier material but hopefully, some reader will read this and help.

Wandering a bit, might I correct the misconception about worn out Myfords 7 series? Actually, number 4 shear is generally unworn. True it is only fine machined but it is true enough for most of us. It means that once the top of the bed is cheaply Blancharded, the worn No1 shear can be built up with a filled with metal epoxy. Alignment with the No4 takes place easily. In other words, you are able to tackle a Myford basket case cheaply and quickly- using home tooling.

Blancharding might be only one of many techniques but suffice to say that -clears throat again- the firm went bust and we were shareholders!

Whatever the outcome, being able to understand how machine tools are constructed and measured is invaluable to know. You might make from castings something like a Stent tool and cutter grinder or even from welded steel fabrications. Contrary to all the so called experts, mine works. No, I bought it but made an earlier cast iron one.

Hope this helps. Keep in touch.

Norman
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Old 08-04-2016, 09:14 AM   #34
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Heh - custom stand, wonder where that came from.

Plan is to create this style stand (per your Shed thread).

J.
Yes, that pic posted after my lathe fell over was the motivation to build my stand.


I already had one of the tool chests so I bought another matching one. Any of the stackable tool chest drawers would work. The drawers have worked out really well. The sample stand is larger than the AL320G and I could not extend the footprint so I decided to use 2 chests on one side and a matching toolbox with the lid removed on the other side. This left room for the coolant and to this day, I have not built the drawer for stock which should sit behind the checkerplate. One day.


Sorry, I don't have any dimensions of the mounting positions. My lathe drip tray is 1230 x 450mm and the stand is 1280 x 450mm which was determined by the dimensions of the drawers and toolbox. Making it all work neatly proved quite a jigsaw puzzle. Frame is 35 x 65mm RHS and 35mm SHS legs.

This pic shows the frame of the stand. You can see the mounting rails have to be higher than the frame due to the drip tray design.


Good luck with it!
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Old 08-04-2016, 10:54 AM   #35
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Rod - what is the thickness on that steel? 4mm?
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Old 08-04-2016, 10:36 PM   #36
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Rod - what is the thickness on that steel? 4mm?
3mm. I think the flat bar was 5mm. Thers is not that much weight. 280 kg bare so there is only about 140 kg per rail
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Old 08-05-2016, 12:43 AM   #37
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Norman - thanks for the book references. I'm hunting them down. I'm almost certainly at information overload point but they will get a read once I get myself some kit and move beyond this book learning business.

Cheers,
James.
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Old 08-05-2016, 04:57 AM   #38
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Norman - thanks for the book references. I'm hunting them down. I'm almost certainly at information overload point but they will get a read once I get myself some kit and move beyond this book learning business.

Cheers,
James.
Glad to have been some assistance. Obviously, you are moving on to purchase of things. Might I suggest that you fully understand Schlesinger and how to test machine tools for accuracy. He certainly sorted the sheep from the goats. Despite the age of the stuff, you should be clear on how tests are or should be conducted.

Obviously, you will still have constraints on just how much so called disposable income you can use- or dare use!

Having been retired for longer than I have had to work- I can look at things very coldly and rationally. 31 years of freedom from the tedium of work and enjoy that freedom is not in any book as far as I know!

Apologies for the exuberance of my own verbosity

Norman
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Old 08-05-2016, 08:14 AM   #39
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Hi James,

Here are the specs for the AL320-G from Machinery House;
https://www.machineryhouse.co.nz/L141

Here's the AL-336D which a couple of us have;
https://www.machineryhouse.co.nz/L682D

Get hold of Bruce and we can set you up for a couple of visits to our respective Workshops. Our Engineering Society has an eclectic mix of Members interested in; Model Rail, Live Steam, Clock-making, Traction Engines, CNC Router & Mills, Tool-making & general faffing about in Workshops.

Murray McKenzie
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Hutt Valley Model Engineering Soc.
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Old 08-05-2016, 09:32 AM   #40
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Thanks Murray. While I love the look of the 336 I think dang near 600kg of iron for a first late is probably a little extreme. The 280kg for the 320G is having me think hard about how to manoeuvre it.

I will look to hook up with Bruce at some point in the new week or so since he's so close to home. I'm quite keen to have a look at his CNC mill. Having built an extrusion 3D Printer (Prusa2 model) and little CNC PCB isolation mill I'm quite interested in that space.

Oh, enjoyed the video on Wednesday. That chap had just WAAY to much spare time. 3.5 years 7 days a week on your hobby sheesh!! No wonder they achieved so much detail. And the hand rails, don't forget the hand rails!

Cheers,
James.


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