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Old 09-23-2017, 04:59 PM   #1
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Default Lathe bed regrinding

Hello,

This is my first post in a long time, you know...life..

Having just moved house and having to build a new shed, I've decided to give my Emcomat 7 a bit of a going over (it literally was bought, chucked in the old shed and put to work as I had work for it).

It has a little bit of wear on the shears so I think after 50 years it deserves a little TLC. So far, Brian Caddy at Slideway Services in Nuneaton, Coventry seems to be the best recommendation. Having spoken to him he is very confident about taking any wear out and refitting the saddle and lead-screw.

Has anyone used him? I'm between Oxford and Reading UK, any other recommendations gratefully received.

Stories, points to be aware of and general banter always welcome!

Cheers,
Rockets.


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Old 09-23-2017, 06:15 PM   #2
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I have no knowledge or experience of this service but assuming that it is as good as Blue Diamond at Shildon, County Durham, there should be no bother. That is where my Myford Super7B bed and saddle were done. I did the rest!.

Earlier and on different flat bed lathes, I had the beds 'Blancharded' for considerably less outlay and I did either a considerable amount of surface grinding and or hand scraping.

If the subject is explored in the light of today, and not the days of Edward Connelly, I would mention that materials and techniques have vastly improved- and simplified.

Probably the topic of restoring basket cases which have so predominated and so regularly repeated can be put to bed once and for all.

I therefore look forward to your account of how professionals do things-- for a change

Norm


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Old 09-23-2017, 07:50 PM   #3
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Norm,

I'll keep you posted. The guy gets a good write up on other forums with several Myford owners saying good things.

The Emcomat machine is a similar size, built in metric dimensions being Austrian.

Cheers,

Rockets
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Old 09-26-2017, 12:36 AM   #4
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If you get the bed ground you probably could save some money by re-marrying the saddle yourself. Generally if the business has a way grinder he should be able to do a credible job. Way grinders aren't cheap so if he has stayed in business for any length of time I would imagine he does a decent job.

I suspect you will get a bit of sticker shock though. At least around here it is pretty hard to justify a grind on a small lathe if you have to pay shop rates.

Dave

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Originally Posted by rockets View Post
Hello,

This is my first post in a long time, you know...life..

Having just moved house and having to build a new shed, I've decided to give my Emcomat 7 a bit of a going over (it literally was bought, chucked in the old shed and put to work as I had work for it).

It has a little bit of wear on the shears so I think after 50 years it deserves a little TLC. So far, Brian Caddy at Slideway Services in Nuneaton, Coventry seems to be the best recommendation. Having spoken to him he is very confident about taking any wear out and refitting the saddle and lead-screw.

Has anyone used him? I'm between Oxford and Reading UK, any other recommendations gratefully received.

Stories, points to be aware of and general banter always welcome!

Cheers,
Rockets.
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Old 09-26-2017, 11:42 AM   #5
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Just for reference I was quoted 850 for a bed 're grind, 're fit of the saddle, compound and top slide. This was for a Myford ML4 7x24" lathe, this doesn't include if any parts would have to be remade or replaced. Considering my lathe was bought for 350, with tooling, chucks ect. I simply cannot justify the expense. As it's more than what the lathe would be worth after the work was done, by more than double, triple even! I have been seeking advice on scraping, which is most likely the route I'll go down. For now I've set the lathe up as best I can and I'll see if I can get somewhere close. I have already managed to get the lathe levelled to turn concentric within 1 thou over 3", so 64thou taper over the length of the bed. To put it another way 1.6mm over the length of 600mm. Well out in precision engineering, but for what I am wanting to do may be just fine.
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Old 09-26-2017, 10:47 PM   #6
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1 thou per 3" is 8 thou over 24" and you cant turn over 600mm lg,probably 12' max so that is 4 thou which is not bad for a new chinese lathe.Be happy with that but keep an eye on it.Have you checked the height of headstock and tailstock.With a piece of round bar between centres check the carriage travel
Also face off a large dia and check cross slide travel square to bed etc As you say if you want to spend serious money buy a different lathe
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Old 09-27-2017, 08:56 AM   #7
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Thanks Baz, must have been sleepy when I wrote that
I've measured my ML4 and it's 20" between centers 3.5" center height. I'll put a straight piece of metal between centers and see wether it wobbles much. When I brought two centers together on the lathe it looks as though it seemed level, though I'm not sure what it'll be like over a longer distance.

Jon
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Old 09-27-2017, 04:38 PM   #8
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Some valid points and interesting experiences. I'm yet to strip the Emcomat down so I'll be having a good measure of the bed and looking for obvious other culprits. I'll get a firm quote before I entrust the machine to the grinding shop. He has the facilities to grind up to 9' in length at his workshop. If the quote is more than the machine is worth then I'll live with it until I upgrade.

As JC mentioned, good set up and reworking the saddle might well improve matters considerably.

Rockets
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Old 09-27-2017, 07:53 PM   #9
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It is an expensive proposition to have a job shop grind and fit. If at all possible consider having the ways ground and then do the fitting yourself. That means hand scraping the saddle to fit the newly ground ways.

As for an Emcomat, this is a better quality lathe so spending a lot of money on it isn't a bad thing. You need to look at it considering how long you expect to keep the lathe. If it is over 20 years the cost of the grinding is trivial. I'd be willing to pay anywhere form 1/3 to 1/2 the lates replacement costs if it is a keeper.


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Some valid points and interesting experiences. I'm yet to strip the Emcomat down so I'll be having a good measure of the bed and looking for obvious other culprits. I'll get a firm quote before I entrust the machine to the grinding shop. He has the facilities to grind up to 9' in length at his workshop. If the quote is more than the machine is worth then I'll live with it until I upgrade.

As JC mentioned, good set up and reworking the saddle might well improve matters considerably.

Rockets
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Old 09-27-2017, 08:36 PM   #10
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Quote:
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It is an expensive proposition to have a job shop grind and fit. If at all possible consider having the ways ground and then do the fitting yourself. That means hand scraping the saddle to fit the newly ground ways.
Actually, today's answer is to build up the underneath of the saddle with something like Turcite.

I've used Loctite 660 on a No1 Shear on a Myford with success and there are other products like Devcon and Moglice which are used professionally.

Hope this helps

Norm


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