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Old 03-07-2016, 01:07 AM   #11
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This is called....... Heat Blue.!!

Used in watches, clocks and guns for a long time. Works especially well
with polished parts.

Not traditionally used for large parts. Small parts and screws.

Pete


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Old 03-07-2016, 08:05 AM   #12
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I tried out a blackening kit from www.janekits.com.au


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Old 03-07-2016, 08:43 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ruzzie View Post
I tried out a blackening kit from www.janekits.com.au
That looks nice !
In any case is a chemical solution, while my way ( well, the way I used, not my way ) does not need anymore than heat.


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Old 03-07-2016, 08:54 AM   #14
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I've been using a chemical blacking kit for years, works very well and the chemicals last for years.

Paul.
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Old 05-17-2016, 09:03 PM   #15
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A very old method indeed!
Used mainly in watch making in the late 1700's, to blue watch hands and screw heads,
the finish can be enhanced with a fine polish prior to heating, the brass swarf method is always used in horology.
Good to see it.
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Old 05-18-2016, 05:22 PM   #16
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Scribealine. You got me. I had to go look that one up.
hoˇrolˇoˇgy
Noun
The study and measurement of time.
The art of making clocks and watches.
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Old 05-18-2016, 06:52 PM   #17
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What is the significance of the brass chips/shavings when torch/heat bluing steel? ie. is there something special about that particular alloy over other choices? Or is brass just what's usually found in a watchmakers chip tray under the lathe?
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Old 05-18-2016, 09:57 PM   #18
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The brass serves to conduct and spread the heat in a uniform way, you can spoon or move the brass around on the part to heat one part more than the other to obtain an even color. Clean sand also works. The emphasis is on clean. Any oil or grease will give color variations. A very fine sand paper finish(2500) grit gives a better blue than a mop polish. The type of steel also affects the color Chrome or nickel does not help things and stainless steel is usually hopeless. It is simple to try and if you are not happy with the results it is not to difficult the remove the blue and try again. Every time this happens the polish also improves! The trick is to keep every thing clean and heat slowly. The atmosphere seems to have some effect on the color as well. The old folk always said to use a charcoal fire for the best results. A hot air gun also works as a heat source but I have not found the results to be quite a good as a flame.
An electric muffle also works, you can take the temperature up a few degrees at a time to get the color you like, especially when the part has thick and thin sections.

Buchanan

Last edited by Buchanan; 05-18-2016 at 09:58 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 05-18-2016, 11:34 PM   #19
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Thanks Buchanan. That's kind of why I was asking the question. The blueing temp looks to be just outside the range of my little re-purposed engine bearing removal oven (formerly known as our kitchen mini toaster oven). But assuming you could dial in a specific temp & let it soak there (maybe a conventional heat treating oven in low temp mode) presumably this would be more consistent vs. a torch... would underlying shavings or sand or whatever make any difference if for example you could jut suspend the part on a wire so it was hanging with the exact same atmosphere all around it & no 'bed' contact of any kind?

ps - I've been lurking on your website just fascinated with the clock constructions. Incredible work.

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Old 05-19-2016, 08:40 PM   #20
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Pertha. yes, I mostly do just that, hang parts (clock) on a thin wire in an oven, The temperatures are obtainable in most cooking devises. Pigi's color chart back a few posts is correct. Screws , I use a block of brass with clearance holes for the thread and heat from below with a small butane torch. Thank you for the compliments . You can see more at www.buchananclocks.com.

Buchanan


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