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Old 09-05-2017, 06:59 PM   #11
tornitore45
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The only children I could possibly entice to ldo something as described have an attention span of 15 seconds and would miss the point by saying: We spent an hour doing something we could buy at Home Depot for $0.89.


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Old 09-05-2017, 07:39 PM   #12
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It is great that he showed an interest. It is around that age that i started building all sorts of things in my fathers garage. Notably with far fewer tools than i have today.

Hopefully he will maintain interest. A book or two donated, that covers mill and lathe operation would be very helpful. I learned a lot in my youth about tools, wood working and machining, from books, simply because we didn't have the physical machines. For the longest time all i had for stationary tools was a beat up contractors saw and a bench grinder. So don't dismiss the advantages of good reading material.


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Old 09-05-2017, 07:48 PM   #13
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I like the idea of simple tool building. There is much that can be learned in small increments as hand tools individually are simple items.

I believe other classic first tools are prick punches and center punches. Extremely simple from the machining standpoint but offering much to learn.
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Originally Posted by Nick Hulme View Post
I just found the "Toffee Hammer" which was my first metalwork project, head marked out, drilled, tapped and filed to shape, round bar handle reduced and threaded for the head end and with a forged loop at the bottom to align with the head when fitted, protruding thread on top riveted over to retain the head and the whole thing Oil Blacked.
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Old 09-05-2017, 09:23 PM   #14
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[QUOTE=Wizard69;297141]I like the idea of simple tool building. There is much that can be learned in small increments as hand tools individually are simple items.

I believe other classic first tools are prick punches and center punches. Extremely simple from the machining standpoint but offering much to learn.[/QUOTE

What has to be remembered is that my generation usually left school at 14 and prior to that had little or no formal education. War started on 3rd September 1939 when I was 9. So school initially was half days only because air raid shelters were being built but obviously at a slow pace as men were already being called up. Male teachers simply disappeared- many in flames as RAF aircrew. I recall that I had one day science when we made common salt-sodium chloride. The rest of my chem and physics prior to being 14 was from a kindly chemist in the colliery village.
I did prosper and from the age of 9 built rubber powered aircraft until balsa went to DH Mosquitos and rubber plantations in the Far East were overrun. At school, I tore up bits of old newspapers and they were mixed with fish glue and Paris plaster and went to make relief maps for the local Home Guard. I had no problem eventually with Physical Geography later.
Models were carved out of solid in usually 1/72 scale and were cut out of what could be called firewood. I recall using a spokeshave which was a piece of broken glass from a bombed out building. Single edged razors were honed on glass tumblers and knives and chisels sharpened on sandstone window sills. The models went on display for things like Savings drives like 'Wings for Victory' and Save the soldier.

I recall Dad making me a Boy Scout axe on the anvil for digging out live incendiary bombs and I got a chisel forged from a worn out pneumatic drill.

We as kids made do and those who left school for engineering apprentices made their own tools as part of their apprenticeships.

That, I assure you was life for most kids.

Me I grew and sold Spinach in the local market to pay for my school fees after the age of 14.

Most of us are dead now but children were skilled despite it all. I'm still in contact with an old RAF engine fitter and I'm dining with a fitter who can still spit out decimals from engineering fractions.

There are few jobs which we are afraid to tackle. It's surprising to find that we learned other skills but our 'hobbies' were not really hobbies, they had a practical use to someone.

Thanks for the space!

Norm


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