Project of the Month built by TonyM

Help Support Home Model Engine Machinist by donating using the link above or becoming a Supporting Member.
Home Model Engine Machinist > The Tools and Tips > The Shop > Setting up Shop Questions - from an NZ learner

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 08-07-2017, 07:12 AM   #581
goldstar31
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 1,439
Liked 319 Times on 273 Posts
Likes Given: 501

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by joco-nz View Post
From what I could see from the guys using a real torch they get a very small red hot spot.

Cheers,
J.
The 'hot spots' as you describe them were through holes made by ones fingers in the plug of wet paper or as Barry recalls, rags.

These MAPP torches are alright in their place. We were prattling about silver soldering- in the Olden Days and I remarked that my late wife did her stuff with a mouth blown alcohol burner. My friend claimed that he still had one---------somewhere

I was introduced to the construction of three wheeled cars engine with motor bike engines and clad( yikes) on a wooden frame, panels from big oil drums. I guess that I was possibly 5 or 6. My Dad tempered the springs using charring with a bit of firewood.

You get a feel for metal

N


goldstar31 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2017, 12:59 PM   #582
ShopShoe
Senior Member
 
ShopShoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Central Iowa, Central U.S.A.
Posts: 699
Liked 102 Times on 93 Posts

Default

"Oil Canning" refers to a panel that has a bulge in it so that you can push on the panel and it will pop in or out, like an oil can bottom.

The technique to take a bulge out of a panel requires an oxyacetylene torch, and a hammer and dolly. Sometimes water is applied after the heat to aid the process. (This is also called "shrinking.")

This is a technique used by old-time car body repairers on the metal used on older cars: Some of the metal used nowadays can not be manipulated in that way.

There is a modern variation of the technique used with spot heaters to take out hail damage without damaging paint.

All of the above refers to car bodies and I have done it for car restorations, but I never got really good at it.

The one thing I can say is that this is a skill that takes a lot of practice to learn, no matter what size and type of metal you are working with. It probably also takes more patience than any other thing I have done in my various shop lives.

--ShopShoe


ShopShoe is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2017, 07:12 PM   #583
joco-nz
 
joco-nz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
Posts: 411
Liked 111 Times on 86 Posts
Likes Given: 87

Default

Thanks gents. I've had a look at the base and even tried a little heat but I think there is just too much tension in there to release via heat shrinking. Looking about on youtube all the examples and discussions I have seen on this oil canning technique seem to deal with quite thin steel. I'm using 2mm and I'm wondering if that is just a bit thick for this approach to work on?
Anyway, after much umming and haring I think I can actually use the mirrored bulging to my advantage. The upward bulge sits under the headstock and the downward bulge sits under the tailstock. This creates a very nice fall for liquid to run towards the tail end and pool in this downward bulge. The other plus is that as a result the best place to put a drainage hole and pipe is well away from where the support brackets need to be. This makes it much easier to setup the tray for sliding in and out when needed.

Also I finished TIG welding out all the seams last night. After letting this cool down I put water into the tray to do a leak test. No initial leaks!


I then left things for about 30 mins and felt along all the seams other than cool meal no dampness. So I think I have a leak free tray.

Next stop is drilling for drainage, setting up required hosing and painting.
__________________
James,
Wellington,
New Zealand
joco-nz is offline  
rodw Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2017, 10:32 AM   #584
rodw
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,029
Liked 310 Times on 241 Posts
Likes Given: 158

Default

Just leave it overnight to be sure its leak free.

If you have a look in my buildup, I pressed a recess for an outlet with 2 different size sockets and a bolt through the pan. You can extend this technique, by machining a set of dies on your lathe. The boys do this quite a bit at work. If you did this at a size that worked for a sink plug, it would be perfect. Then just run the return coolant through a stainless steel colander on its way it back to the reservoir.
__________________
RodW
Brisbane, Australia
vehiclemods.net.au
rodw is offline  
bazmak Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2017, 05:28 AM   #585
joco-nz
 
joco-nz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
Posts: 411
Liked 111 Times on 86 Posts
Likes Given: 87

Default

Cheers Rod. I think given the amount of time I'll use coolant I think if it's not leaking in any noticeable way after half an hour then it's probably fine. Also once I put a couple of coats of paint on things and possible microscopic pin hole will be even more bunged up.

On the drainage hole front the idea a mate gave me was to drill small holes (say 3mm) in a pattern at the low point and weld or epoxy a pipe on the other side. This would do the same job and not need to go and make more tooling. But I quite like the compression die idea. Defiantly keeping thy in back of mind for future things.

J.
__________________
James,
Wellington,
New Zealand
joco-nz is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2017, 10:09 AM   #586
joco-nz
 
joco-nz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
Posts: 411
Liked 111 Times on 86 Posts
Likes Given: 87

Default

I knocked up some brackets from leftover 2mm sheet from the tray and some 25x3mm flat. These will get welded onto the stand and act as supports/slides for the flood tray.



Cheers,
J.
__________________
James,
Wellington,
New Zealand
joco-nz is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2017, 11:26 AM   #587
joco-nz
 
joco-nz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
Posts: 411
Liked 111 Times on 86 Posts
Likes Given: 87

Default

Bit of a big update from efforts over the last number of days.

Brackets welded on the lathe.


The tray setup on the lathe before drilling the drain, attaching the drip pipe and painting.




The drip pipe under the drain. It's stainless pipe and not having any correct filler rod I decided to try my hand at TIG brazing. So out with the silicone bronze to see what I could manage. Not great but not a disaster either and it seems to have no holes.


Painting the flood tray. Nothing very original here, had a pot of rapid dry enamel black so thats what was used.


Lathe back on stand and ready to start tuning again while setting the flood tray etc in parallel.


Cheers,
J.
__________________
James,
Wellington,
New Zealand
joco-nz is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2017, 03:43 AM   #588
joco-nz
 
joco-nz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
Posts: 411
Liked 111 Times on 86 Posts
Likes Given: 87

Default Lathe levelling completed

Okay we are back. The drip tray is pretty much done and the paint is drying so while that happens I have gotten the lathe back on the stand and its all levelled up. This time no rubber pads under the levelling feet. I also squared the base of the feet to the bolt in the mill. Especially after re-welding them so they would be very unlikely to break again.



I then embarked on an exercise to true things up using Rollie's Dad's method. I know there are lots of discussions on how good or not good this approach is but it seemed to make sense, I had the tools to try so what the heck.

I had some round bars that were rollers from a printer or photocopier (thanks Bruce!) one of which I used as the test bar. Setup the 0.01mm test indicator and off we went.

Here are screen shots from the spreadsheet I used to track the numbers for the horizontal then vertical tests.




From these you can see the horizontal was pretty much on the money right from the start. The delta was very small and while I could have gone for even higher accuracy I actually don't have anything that measure better than 0.01mm.

The vertical needed a bit of work. I started putting shims under the tail and no noticeable improvement in fact things started to get worse. So I removed those shims (0.1mm thick aluminium from soda cans). I then put a set under the headstock end. Since this "foot" is rather large and covers two support beams this means 4 shims in total.


This moved the delta to 0.03mm. I decided that didn't seem too bad so decided it was time to cut a test parallel. So to control over hang I took some ~19mm round bar and took some cuts over 100mm length using power feed to get a really consistent surface. The moment of truth ...
Measuring the tail end.


Measuring at the head stock end.


BINGO! Cutting parallel. Well at least within the limits of my 0.01mm callipers.


Cheers,
James.
__________________
James,
Wellington,
New Zealand

Last edited by joco-nz; 08-13-2017 at 06:07 AM. Reason: improved contrast of caliper reading at tailstock end
joco-nz is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2017, 08:57 AM   #589
joco-nz
 
joco-nz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
Posts: 411
Liked 111 Times on 86 Posts
Likes Given: 87

Default Lathe stand starting to look like its old self

The stand starting to look like its old self. Need to get on to the coolant side of things and will document that for those interested.

__________________
James,
Wellington,
New Zealand
joco-nz is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2017, 07:27 AM   #590
joco-nz
 
joco-nz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
Posts: 411
Liked 111 Times on 86 Posts
Likes Given: 87

Default Bandsaw DIY coolant system - TICK

Not claiming much originalty in this as you can find a number of examples on the net. However I thought I would share my attempt at a coolant system on these small hobby metal bandsaws.

Starting out with some hex brass stock thanks to Bruce for that material. Drilling 6mm all the way through then enlarging to 11.5mm to a depth of around 20mm ready for the 1/2-20 tap.




All tapped and tested with the coolant pipe.


Next was to create the end for the coolant feeder pipe to go on.
Starting to turn it all down.


Comparing my work to the plastic fetting that screws into the submerged pump.


Ready to TIG braze the brass parts together. For the record brass hates me when it comes this process. I have had no issue with steel to steel. But Brass to Brass or Brass to Steel has been a nightmare.


The results after MUCH cleaning. You can see the figghts I had getting the silicone bronze filler rod to "flow" and the trouble I had with over heating the base metal in an effort to smooth out the filler rod. But in the end it seems to be stuck well enough for what I need.




Ta da! The custom fitting on the bandsaw, adjustable nozzel in place plumbed up to the pump system.


Steeping back and looking at the saw in total.


Under the system I eneded up having the drain drip straight into the bucket. I'm going to look at this some more and see if there are some improvements to be had.


Now for some live action ...

Cheers,
James.


__________________
James,
Wellington,
New Zealand
joco-nz is offline  
3
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Learner in Houston says hello Naiveambition Introduction 1 03-13-2013 03:37 AM
Setting up a VFD? lazylathe General Engine Discussion 64 04-07-2012 02:31 AM
setting top slide firebird General Engine Discussion 4 12-11-2008 10:38 PM
Setting up my new shop Bogstandard The Break Room 246 09-23-2008 01:21 PM
Setting up shop. Tin Falcon Tips and Tricks 4 12-23-2007 05:18 PM



Newest Threads






- Top - Member List